International Academy for Intercultural Research 

A professional interdisciplinary organization dedicated to the understanding and improvement of intercultural relations through world-class social science research
Established 1997

Officers of the Academy

Nan Sussman—President

sussman nan2

I was trained as a social and cross-cultural psychologist at the University of Kansas (M.A., PhD.), became a Professional Associate at the East-West Center in Honolulu, and completed my training at the Intercultural Communication Institute at Stanford University.  I have had a 30-year career in the field of cultural psychology: as a scholar, educator, and practitioner.  

As a researcher, I have maintained a program of research focusing on the psychological aspects of cultural transitions, in particular repatriation. Other research has focused on acculturation and health, and culture and nonverbal behavior. I was awarded two Fulbright Fellowships, conducting research in Japan and Hong Kong.  My recent book is Return Migration and Identity: A Global Phenomenon, A Hong Kong Case. I am on the editorial board of the International Journal of Intercultural Relations and I serve as a grant panelist for the Hong Kong Research Grants Council. My work has been reported in the Wall St. Journal AsiaSouth China Morning Post, the China Daily, the Los Angeles Times, and Hong Kong Magazine. As a practitioner, I specialize in training people for the global workplace and in preparing employees to live and work abroad and successfully return home. I have trained Indo-Chinese refugees, American executives, Nigerian trainees, American students embarking on study abroad, repatriated JET teachers, World Bank staff, Chinese technicians, foreign service officers and managers from developing countries. I wrote and produced the training series, American Social Behavior: Sources of Cultural Misunderstanding. As an educator, I have taught at five US and six international universities.  In 1982, I joined the College of Staten Island, and Graduate Center, City University of New York where I am a Professor of Psychology and a member of the CUNY doctoral faculty.  I currently serve as Interim Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences.

I have been a member of IAIR almost since its founding.  I have served on the Board of Directors and have attended all of the conferences but one.

Email:nan.sussman@csi.cuny.edu
Website: www.library.csi.cuny.edu/sussman

Young Yun Kim— Past-President

young yun kim

 

I am a professor of communication at the University of Oklahoma, teaching courses and directing dissertation studies in the area of intercultural and interethnic communication. As a founding fellow of the Academy, I have served as a member of the Board of Directors and as the Vice President/President-Elect, and now as the President. I also have been honored to be named a fellow of the International Communication Association and a Top Scholar for Lifetime Achievement in Intercultural Communication. I began studying the phenomenon of cross-cultural adaptation for my doctoral dissertation (1976) at Northwestern University in Illinois. I have since conducted original studies among other immigrants, refugees, and ethnic minorities in the United States. These original studies, along with the numerous published works across social science disciplines, provided empirical grounding for the integrative theory of cross-cultural adaptation, developed first in Communication and Cross-Cultural Adaptation (1988) and further refined in Becoming Intercultural (2001). Over the past two decades, I have extended my research domain to issues of race and ethnicity within a society, carrying out a series of original studies investigating various psychological, situational, and macro-environmental factors influencing communication behaviors of individuals when they encounter ethnically dissimilar others. These research efforts are reflected in the initial rendition of the contextual theory of interethnic communication (2005), which is currently being fully elaborated and illustrated in a book manuscript. Some of the non-academic activities I deeply enjoy are attending classical concerts/operas and backpacking deep in the wilderness.

Email: youngkim@ou.edu
Website: http://cas.ou.edu/young-kim

David Lackland Sam - President-Elect

My interest in intercultural relations stems from the culture shock that I had when I first arrived in Norway nearly 30 years ago.  I had never been out of my home country, Ghana, before coming to Norway.  I had arrived in Norway with the goal of pursuing graduate studies in industrial and organizational psychology.  However, a simple question at a get-together, what is it like to be an international student in Norway, changed my study plans.  After using over an hour answering this question, I asked myself whether my experiences were unique to me or general to international students. I therefore began my first research in acculturation, in 1985, with the goal of understanding my own experiences.  Subsequently, I expanded my interest to the acculturation of young immigrants, before embarking on a more comparative approach to these issues.   I have also been involved in research on recruitment of immigrants into the labor force. I am presently completing a study on international students in Ghana, and about to start a comparative study on Russians in Norway and Estonia. As part of my research work, I succeeded in getting the Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway, to make Cross-Cultural Psychology a core course in our psychology program. I am presently Professor of Cross-Cultural Psychology at the University of Bergen, and I divide my responsibilities between the Faculty of Psychology and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry. I am presently preparing to welcome the Academy to its 9th Biennial Congress in Bergen, June 28 – July 2, 2015. See: https://www.uib.no/rg/saw/konferanse/2013/10/iair. I became interested in IAIR after attending the Oxford, Mississippi conference, in 2001, and then the Kent, Ohio, Conference in 2005.  Before then, I received the first Early Career Award of the Academy, and have been a Fellow since. I love classical music, and one of my passions is to attend classical music concerts.  I love travelling, particularly visiting places and meeting new cultural groups.  Otherwise, between my busy daily routines, I love listening to audiobooks.

 

Email: david.sam@psysp.uib.no
Website: http://www.uib.no/rg/saw

Dan Landis—Executive Director & Treasurer

landis dan2

I formally retired in 2002 after 40 years of teaching and researching cross-cultural psychology and intergroup relations at such institutions as Wisconsin State College at Oshkosh (now the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh),the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories in Philadelphia, the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, Indiana University–Purdue University in Indianapolis, and the University of Mississippi. I moved to Hawaii in 2002 and was appointedaffiliate professor at both the Manoa and Hilo campuses of the University of Hawaii, where I presently advise graduate students on their theses and dissertations. I completed my doctoral studies at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI (1963), which is also where I met and married Rae Morris, my wife of 53 years. Over my career, my research interests have spanned areas of cross-cultural training and research, the measurement of equal opportunity climate, individual-differences research and methodology, evaluation of social programs, development of theory in social psychology, and cross-cultural aspects of human sexuality. In 1977, I founded the interdisciplinary journal, the International Journal of Intercultural Relations (IJIR), and was its editor-in-chief for 35years (1977–2011). As a founding fellow of the Academy, I was elected its first president in 1997 and remained in that office for five years. I am currently the organization’s Executive Director and Treasurer. In 2007, I was honored to receive the Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award and, in 2011, to receive the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. I have edited three editions of the Handbook of Intercultural Training (1983, 1996, 2004) and most recently co-edited the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives with Rosita Albert.  This volume surveys 20 ethnic conflicts in-depth around the worldand was awarded the Academy’s 2013 Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award at the biennial conference in Reno, NV.Currently, I am working on two additional books: a fourth edition of the Handbook of Intercultural Training and a volume on the relationship of neuroscience and intercultural relations.(Profile adapted from the November 2012 issue of the American Psychologist, 67[8], 731-733.)

Email: danl@hawaii.edu
Website: http://www.interculturalacademy.org/briefbio.htm

L. Ripley Smith - Secretary

My journey down the path of intercultural studies began in the world of sport. Growing up in a large family with few resources left me with one inexpensive option for youth athletics - soccer. Within that soccer community I was introduced to the diverse social network (we called them friends back then) resident in my Colorado foothills neighborhood. Fast-forward to my senior year in college, a life-changing experience serving internally displaced people near Hermosillo, Mexico, and exposure to debilitating injustice and marginalization, set me on the course to study intercultural social support networks, acculturation, refugee resettlement, cross-cultural partnership development, and the role of trust in post-conflict regions.

I pursued my PhD at the University of Minnesota and learned of the ICC heritage birthed within those halls – the reputations of Howell, Paige, Albert, Gudykunst, Wiseman, Koester, and Hammer, among others motivated me to understand and address critical questions and problems within intercultural relations. It was the inaugural conference call by Bill Gudykunst that first drew my attention to IAIR. At that conference I experienced an uncommon camaraderie amongst the attendees that was foreign to my other conference involvements – I was nominated as a fellow shortly thereafter and have attended most of the conferences.

Alongside my role as professor at Bethel University I work and consult with local refugee resettlement agencies in Minneapolis/St. Paul. To keep things interesting, every other fall I take my guitar and 25 students to Europe for a semester abroad. And, yes, I still play soccer!

Email: r-smith@bethel.edu
Website: http://cas.bethel.edu/dept/comm/faculty/r-smith

 

 

 

Board Members

Katja Hanke - Board Member

I love to discover new places and experience new cultures, and as Gustave Flaubert put it: “Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” I am a so-called “German with a migrant background” (official German category), since my mother is originally from South Korea.  I studied psychology in Germany, but my adventures started in New Zealand when I was travelling there during a working holiday for a year. I did a research internship at the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research (CACR) in Wellington, New Zealand and subsequently embarked on pursuing a PhD degree in cross-cultural psychology in 2006. This has been to date the most stimulating academic experience I had. After finishing my PhD in New Zealand, I did my first post doc in Taiwan which was a challenging, but a very rich experience. Now, I am back in Germany working as a lecturer at Jacobs University in Bremen. Currently, I am also a Marie Curie fellow on a “Career Integration Grant” by the European Commission. The Marie Curie project, “Belongingness,” examines the host-migrant relationships in Germany from multiple angles. My research broadly focuses on the intersection between social and cross-cultural psychology. In particular, I am interested in intercultural and intergroup relations, acculturation, peace psychology and applied social psychology as well as (cross-cultural) research methods.

Email: ka.hanke@jacobs-university.de
Website: http://www.bigsss-bremen.de/user/katja-hanke/about

Wenshan Jia - Board Member

I am a professor of communication in the Department of Communication Studies, Chapman University, Orange County, CA, USA.  My areas of research interest are intercultural communication, global communication, communication theory, Chinese communication and media, and the US-China relationship.  I also teach in these research areas.  I have a publication record of six academic books, 60 scholarly articles/book chapters/reviews/translations. I have made about 100 scholarly presentations, out of which six are keynote presentations, 54 guest presentations/guest instructions and 39 conference presentations. I have received about a dozen major research awards including one IAIR Early-Career Award, Wang-Fradkin Professorship award from Chapman University and half a dozen book awards and Choice “Outstanding Book” titles. Having reviewed for 30 some journals/publishers/research foundations, I am on the editorial boards of several prestigious journals including International Journal for Intercultural Relations and Asian Journal of Communication. I have also received more than a dozen interviews/news reports from various international media for my expertise. 

During my spare time, I have been consulting on brand communication and global business communication and a local international friendship city project.  I served as chair of the Faculty Personnel Council, interim department chair, and founding director of the Asian Studies Program at Chapman University. I have been an IAIR fellow since 2005 and on the IAIR Board since June 2013. Currently, I am authoring a book on global communication and editing a textbook reader on intercultural communication.  I love hiking with my family and friends, rock & roll, and jazz besides Peking Opera and Italian Opera and classic music.

Email: jia@chapman.edu
Website: http://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/wenshan-jia

Adam Komisarof - Board Member

I am a professor in the Department of Economic Studies & Business Administration at Reitaku University near Tokyo, and I spent last year at the University of Oxford (as a visiting academic at the Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies and a senior associate member of St. Antony’s College).  I am also an IAIR fellow and serving as a membership representative on the executive board.  In my free time, I am a corporate intercultural trainer and have worked with clients such as Sony, Mitsubishi, Visa, and many others. 

I have two main research interests: 1. the relationship between acculturation strategies and quality of intercultural relationships (particularly in Japan), and 2. intercultural communication teaching methodology.  My first book, On the Front Lines of Forging a Global Society: Japanese and American Coworkers in Japan, won Reitaku University’s Excellence in Research Award last year.  My latest book is At Home Abroad: The Contemporary Western Experience in Japan.  I have been actively promoting it this year in Oxford, London, and Tokyo—recently, for example, at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan and the Harvard University Club. 

In my year at Oxford, I was very impressed by the quality of scholarship, but I could find no faculty members or courses in acculturation psychology or intercultural communication.  This strengthened my conviction that we have much more work ahead in sharing what we do to help promote intercultural understanding. 

My hobbies include playing and watching basketball, boogie boarding, karaoke, and unlike any other member of IAIR, travel!

Email: akomisar@reitaku-u.ac.jp
Website: http://www.japanintercultural.com/en/about/Japan_AdamKomisarof.aspx

Saba Safdar - Board Member

I am an Iranian-born Canadian-educated associate professor at the Psychology Department, University of Guelph. I moved to Canada in the 1980s after the Islamic revolution in Iran. I completed my undergraduate honours degree at McMaster University and my graduate training at York University in Toronto, Canada.

I am the director of the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the University of Guelph where my students and I conduct research that lies broadly within the area of cross-cultural psychology. My research primarily examines the wide range of factors that could help to understand adaptation processes of immigrants. I study the influence of the psychological resilience of immigrants, of their beliefs and strategies, and of their ethnic and national identities on their adaptation in a new society. I currently study the relation between the expression of identity and attitudes toward ethnic and conventional fashion/clothing among second generation immigrants in Canada.

I am a fellow of the International Academy for Intercultural Research (IAIR) and an active member of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP) and the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA). I have served as the chair of the International and Cross-Cultural Section of the CPA. I am a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, the Journal of International and Intercultural Relations, and the Journal of Iranian Psychologists.

I have recently started a film making class, and in my spare time I take short films of little and big things around me including my dog, the garden, and the new kitten in our household.

Email: ssafdar@uoguelph.ca
Website: http://www.psychology.uoguelph.ca/faculty/safdar/

Rosita Albert - Board Member

I grew up in Brazil, of European parents. I came to the U.S. as an exchange student in high school and became fascinated with the cultural differences between Brazil and the U.S. Thus, the world lost a terrible chemist when my Oberlin College advisor told me to focus on the subjects of psychology, sociology, and anthropology (since intercultural courses did not exist yet).

I received my PhD in social psychology from the University of Michigan. I then worked at the Center for Policy Research and taught at New York University and at Rutgers University. In 1974 I met Harry Triandis at the first SIETAR conference, and collaborated on a State of Illinois grant to conduct research on cultural differences between Latin Americans and North Americans. Although my husband had a job in Pennsylvania, I moved to Champaign/Urbana, Illinois to direct the project on interactions between Latino pupils and their North American teachers, and  then became as an assistant professor of educational psychology at Illinois. I published articles on Latino/Anglo American interactions in IJIR, contributed to two editions of the Landis et al. Handbook of Intercultural Training, and consulted for the World Bank and other organizations. Later I moved to the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota, where I continued to research Latino/Anglo communication and the Intercultural Sensitizer (Cultural Assimilator).

I am a founding member of IAIR, have attended all of its meetings, served on the editorial board of the IJIR for many years, and have been a member or chair of IAIR’s Membership Committee since the beginning of the Academy.  I also served on the Board of Directors of the Academy until 2011.  In 2013, a book I co-edited with Dan Landis titled the Handbook of Ethnic Conflicts: International Perspectives won the Academy’s Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award.

 

Email:Alber001@umn.edu
Website: http://www.comm.umn.edu/faculty/profile.php?UID=alber001

Ronald Fischer - Board Member

My name is Ronald Fischer and I am a reader at Victoria University of Wellington and a fellow of the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research. Growing up behind the Iron Curtain in former East Germany made me deeply curious about the wider world beyond, and this curiosity about other people, their cultures and social conditions has driven a lot of my research. Since then, I have been fortunate to work with individuals and communities in remote corners of the world. My work today focuses on an integration of social sciences with biological and evolutionary approaches to provide a more interdisciplinary and holistic perspective on human behaviour in social context and help with the development of theory-driven interventions to address social and human problems. I have been awarded a Marie Curie-Cofund Fellowship at the Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies in Denmark to pursue this vision focusing on collective rituals. Colleen Ward introduced me to IAIR, and I enjoyed the friendly atmosphere during my first Intercultural Academy Conference in Taiwan in 2004. I have been involved with the IAIR community since then, reviewing for the journal and being part of the selection committee for the Dan and Rae Landis Doctoral Thesis Award commission in some years. My work on organizational justice and values was honoured in 2007 with an Early Career Award from IAIR at the conference in Groningen. My work continues to attract attention and more recently, I was included in the top ten list for most cited cross-cultural psychologists. I am an associate editor for the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and also serve on a number of editorial boards of psychology and management journals. Outside work, I practice and teach Capoeira (an Afro-Brazilian martial-arts) and love photography. Check out my blog at culturemindspace.blogspot.com.

 

Email: ronald.fischer@vuw.ac.nz

Jane Jackson - Board Member

Jane Jackson (PhD, OISE/U of Toronto) is professor in the English Department at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). She has teaching and research experience in many countries/regions: Canada, the USA, the Sultanate of Oman, Egypt, Mainland China, the U.K., and Hong Kong. An elected fellow of the International Academy for Intercultural Research in 2002, Jane has attended IAIR conferences in Taiwan, the Netherlands, and the USA. She serves on the editorial board of the International Encyclopedia of Intercultural Communication (Wiley-Blackwell)and is a member of the advisory board of the Language and Intercultural Communication journal.

Her research interests include intercultural communication, language and identity, and education abroad. With the support of competitive research grants, Jane has been investigating the ‘whole person development’ of international exchange students from Hong Kong and Mainland China. Her research has inspired the design of face-to-face and online courses that aim to promote intercultural competence and optimize education abroad learning. As well as many journal articles and chapters in edited collections, recent books include Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication (Routledge, 2014), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Intercultural Communication (Routledge, 2012) (editor), Intercultural Journeys: From Study to Residence Abroad (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010), and Language, Identity, and Study Abroad: Sociocultural Perspectives (Equinox, 2008).

Recognized for innovative teaching practices, Jane is the recipient of CUHK’s 2013 Education Award and a member of the University’s Teaching Excellence Ambassador Program, which promotes effective teaching and learning. She loves to travel and is a keen photographer and hiker.

E-mail: jjackson@cuhk.edu.hk
Webpage: http://www.eng.cuhk.edu.hk/eng/about/academic_staff_detail/21

Jennifer Mahon - Board Member

Jennifer Mahon, Ph.D. is an associate professor of sociocultural education at the University of Nevada, Reno. She is a former board member of IAIR, and the recovering conference host of IAIR 2013. Her work focuses on international and intercultural education, teacher exchange, and intercultural awareness development. Growing out of the critical tradition, Dr. Mahon examines the ways in which cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary experiences can affect change, and how institutional norms and structures become barriers to international growth. She holds degrees from Kent State University, the University of Dayton (U.S.), and the University of New England (Australia). She has been a secondary educator in Australia, England, Costa Rica, and the U.S. She is a State of Nevada conflict mediator and a graduate of the Gremlin Taming Institute (ask her about it!).  She loves public speaking, (ask her to come do it!), and secretly dreams of being a stand-up comic. When she is not out planning conferences, Dr J. (as her students call her) spends time with her 4 year old twins, their gargantuan Great Dane, and 2 fierce felines. She loves living in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and showing off Lake Tahoe. She is saving pennies for a horse (and a college fund for the kids, if there’s any money left over after the horse). She has been known to get a little goofy in the presence of John Berry, and is in a race with Ken Cushner and Marisa Mealy to get the most passport stamps (she is losing!)

Email: jmahon@unr.edu
Website: http://www.unr.edu/education/contact-us/faculty/mahon

Committees

Scientific Committee

David Lackland Sam

My interest in intercultural relations stems from the culture shock that I had when I first arrived in Norway nearly 30 years ago.  I had never been out of my home country, Ghana, before coming to Norway.  I had arrived in Norway with the goal of pursuing graduate studies in industrial and organizational psychology.  However, a simple question at a get-together, what is it like to be an international student in Norway, changed my study plans.  After using over an hour answering this question, I asked myself whether my experiences were unique to me or general to international students. I therefore began my first research in acculturation, in 1985, with the goal of understanding my own experiences.  Subsequently, I expanded my interest to the acculturation of young immigrants, before embarking on a more comparative approach to these issues.   I have also been involved in research on recruitment of immigrants into the labor force. I am presently completing a study on international students in Ghana, and about to start a comparative study on Russians in Norway and Estonia. As part of my research work, I succeeded in getting the Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway, to make Cross-Cultural Psychology a core course in our psychology program. I am presently Professor of Cross-Cultural Psychology at the University of Bergen, and I divide my responsibilities between the Faculty of Psychology and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry. I am presently preparing to welcome the Academy to its 9th Biennial Congress in Bergen, June 28 – July 2, 2015. See: https://www.uib.no/rg/saw/konferanse/2013/10/iair. I became interested in IAIR after attending the Oxford, Mississippi conference, in 2001, and then the Kent, Ohio, Conference in 2005.  Before then, I received the first Early Career Award of the Academy, and have been a Fellow since. I love classical music, and one of my passions is to attend classical music concerts.  I love travelling, particularly visiting places and meeting new cultural groups.  Otherwise, between my busy daily routines, I love listening to audiobooks.

Email: david.sam@psysp.uib.no
Website: http://www.uib.no/rg/saw

Kenneth Cushner

I have been a professor of international and intercultural teacher education at Kent State University since 1987.  My presence there, however, goes back much further to when I was a freshman in the crowd of students who were fired upon on May 4th, 1970, hiding behind a car that had its windows shot out.  That was my ‘wake-up-call’ so to speak -- when I realized the need to understand alternative viewpoints rather than resorting to violence when there was a difference of opinion and belief. 

I taught in schools in Switzerland and Australia where I began traveling internationally with young people.  The need to ‘legitimize’ what I found to be transformative in the lives of young people led me to pursue a doctoral degree at the University of Hawaii through the East West Center where I studied with Richard Brislin.  I returned to Kent State University where, in addition to my teaching, have served as Associate Dean and Executive Director of International Affairs.

I am a Founding Fellow of IAIR, have served as a Board Member, Past President (2007 – 2009), hosted two conferences (1999 and 2005), and serve on the editorial board of IJIR.  My research interests continue to focus on the intercultural development of teachers and young people.  I am Director of COST – the Consortium of Overseas Student Teaching; a collaboration of 15 U.S. universities that send student teachers overseas, and was director of Semester at Sea’s Teachers at Sea program during the summers of 2010 and 2011.  My work with Richard Brislin and the culture-general assimilator (Intercultural interactions: A Practical Guide) has enabled me to consult with a wide range of organizations, including the U.S. Army Research Institute; the World Bank; ETIC – the Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation; and to receive a Fulbright to Sweden in 2008.  My teacher education textbook, Human Diversity in Education: An Intercultural Approach) will soon be published in its 8th edition.  In my spare time, I enjoy travel, photography, cycling, and when possible, still play percussion with my (now very old) rock and roll friends!

Email: kcushner@kent.edu
Website: www.kent.edu/ehhswww.costprogram.org

Lifetime Achievement Award Committee

Dharm P. S. Bhawuk

Dharm P.S. Bhawuk (Ph. D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), is a professor of management and culture and community psychology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.  He brings with him the experience of living and growing in a developing economy, Nepal. He started his intercultural journey with a month at an international children’s camp in Artek, USSR, in 1972.  His interdisciplinary training includes a bachelor of technology (B. Tech, Honors) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, in Mechanical Engineering, a master’s of business administration from the University of Hawaii at Manoa with a fellowship from the East-West Center, where he did research with Professor Richard W. Brislin in the area of intercultural training, and a Ph.D. in industrial relations with specialization in human resource management and cross-cultural psychology under the guidance of Professor Harry Triandis at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has research interests in indigenous psychology and management, cross-cultural training, intercultural sensitivity, diversity in the workplace, individualism and collectivism, culture and creativity, and spirituality. He is originally from Nepal (US citizen and resident of Hawaii), and has published 60 papers, book chapters, special issues of journals, and books.  He is author of the book Spirituality and Indian Psychology: Lessons from the Bhagavad-Gita (Springer, 2011) and co-editor of the book Asian Contributions to Cross-Cultural Psychology (Sage, 1996). He has co-edited special issues of journals on globalization and diversity (International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 2008, volume 32, no. 4; with Professor Young Kim) and Indian psychology (Psychology and Developing Societies, 2010, volume 22, no. 1; with Professor E.S. Srinivas).  He has made about 160 presentations at international conferences and universities. He has received many awards including Best Paper Award from the Academy of Management (2009 and 1996), Professor of the Semester (2007), the Distinguished Service Award from the East West Center (1989), and the Lum Yup Key Outstanding MBA Student Award from the University of Hawai‘i  (1990). He is a Founding Fellow of the International Academy for Intercultural Research, and was the H. Smith Richardson, Jr. Visiting Fellow of the Center for Creative Leadership for 2009-10.

 

Email: Bhawuk@hawaii.edu
Website: http://bhawuk.shidler.hawaii.edu/


John Berry

 

John Berry is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada and Research Professor, National Research University, Moscow, Russia (http://scr.hse.ru/en/). He has received Honorary Doctorates in 2001 from the University of Athens, and from the Université de Genève. He received his BA from Sir George Williams University in Montréal, Canada in 1963, and his PhD from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland in 1966. He emmigrated to Australia in 1966 for three years, then returned to Canada. His recent publications with colleaguesinclude a textbook (Cross-Cultural Psychology: Research and Applications, 3rd edition, Cambridge University Press, 2011; Handbook of Acculturation Psychology, Cambridge, 2006; and Immigrant Youth in Cultural Transition, 2006, LEA). He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, and the International Academy for Intercultural Research. He received the Hebb Award for Contributions to Psychology as a Science in 1999, and the award for Contributions to the Advancement of International Psychology in 2012 (both from CPA), the Interamerican Psychology Award, from the Sociedad Interamericana de Psicologia (in 2001), and the  Lifetime Contribution Award from IAIR (in 2005). His current research includes coordinating an international study in 24 countries “Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies” (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). He serves as the editor of the Psychology Area for the International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioural Sciences http://mrw.elsevier.com/isb2/menu.htm).He lives in the Thousand Islands (Canada) in the Summer, and in the British Virgin Islands in the Winter, sailing and swimming.

Email:elderberrys@gmail.com
Website: http://www.queensu.ca/psychology/People/Emeritus-Retired/JohnBerry.html

Harry Triandis

Harry Triandis is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Illinois. He was born in 1926.   His bachelor’s degree is from McGill, his master’s is from the University of Toronto, and his 1958 Ph.D. is from Cornell University in Ithaca N.Y. He has received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Athens, Greece, in 1987. He is the author of Attitudes and Attitude Change (1971), Analysis of Subjective Culture (1972), Interpersonal Behavior (1977), Variations in Black and White Perceptions of the Social Environment (1976), Culture and Social Behavior (1994), and Individualism and Collectivism (1995).   His most recent (2009) book is Fooling Ourselves: Self-Deception in Politics, Religion, and Terrorism (this book received the William James Award of Div. 1 of the American Psychological Association). He was the general editor of the six-volume Handbook of Cross-Cultural Psychology,   and co-editor (with Dunnette & Hough) of Volume 4 of the Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (1994).

In 1969 Triandis attended a meeting, in Estes Park, CO, with cross-cultural trainers from the Peace Corps. This group created SIETAR (the Society for Intercultural Training and Research). After ten years or so several members of that group decided that SIETAR emphasized training too much and research too little and formed the International Academy of Intercultural Research (IAIR). For most of these years Triandis attended the meetings of both of these societies. The last time he attended their meetings was in 2009. He spends a good deal of time listening to classical music. Now he is too old to travel, so he is writing his autobiography.

Email: Triandis@Illinois.edu

Dan Landis


 

I formally retired in 2002 after 40 years of teaching and researching cross-cultural psychology and intergroup relations at such institutions as Wisconsin State College at Oshkosh (now the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh),the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories in Philadelphia, the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, Indiana University–Purdue University in Indianapolis, and the University of Mississippi. I moved to Hawaii in 2002 and was appointedaffiliate professor at both the Manoa and Hilo campuses of the University of Hawaii, where I presently advise graduate students on their theses and dissertations. I completed my doctoral studies at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI (1963), which is also where I met and married Rae Morris, my wife of 53 years. Over my career, my research interests have spanned areas of cross-cultural training and research, the measurement of equal opportunity climate, individual-differences research and methodology, evaluation of social programs, development of theory in social psychology, and cross-cultural aspects of human sexuality. In 1977, I founded the interdisciplinary journal, the International Journal of Intercultural Relations (IJIR), and was its editor-in-chief for 35years (1977–2011). As a founding fellow of the Academy, I was elected its first president in 1997 and remained in that office for five years. I am currently the organization’s Executive Director and Treasurer. In 2007, I was honored to receive the Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award and, in 2011, to receive the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. I have edited three editions of the Handbook of Intercultural Training (1983, 1996, 2004) and most recently co-edited the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives with Rosita Albert.  This volume surveys 20 ethnic conflicts in-depth around the worldand was awarded the Academy’s 2013 Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award at the biennial conference in Reno, NV.Currently, I am working on two additional books: a fourth edition of the Handbook of Intercultural Training and a volume on the relationship of neuroscience and intercultural relations.(Profile adapted from the November 2012 issue of the American Psychologist, 67[8], 731-733.)

(Email) danl@hawaii.edu

(Web) http://www.interculturalacademy.org/briefbio.htm


Outstanding Dissertation Award Committee

Katja Hanke

I love to discover new places and experience new cultures, and as Gustave Flaubert put it: “Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” I am a so-called “German with a migrant background” (official German category), since my mother is originally from South Korea.  I studied psychology in Germany, but my adventures started in New Zealand when I was travelling there during a working holiday for a year. I did a research internship at the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research (CACR) in Wellington, New Zealand and subsequently embarked on pursuing a PhD degree in cross-cultural psychology in 2006. This has been to date the most stimulating academic experience I had. After finishing my PhD in New Zealand, I did my first post doc in Taiwan which was a challenging, but a very rich experience. Now, I am back in Germany working as a lecturer at Jacobs University in Bremen. Currently, I am also a Marie Curie fellow on a “Career Integration Grant” by the European Commission. The Marie Curie project, “Belongingness,” examines the host-migrant relationships in Germany from multiple angles. My research broadly focuses on the intersection between social and cross-cultural psychology. In particular, I am interested in intercultural and intergroup relations, acculturation, peace psychology and applied social psychology as well as (cross-cultural) research methods.

Email: ka.hanke@jacobs-university.de
Website: http://www.bigsss-bremen.de/user/katja-hanke/about

Early Career Award Committee

Wenshan Jia

I am a professor of communication in the Department of Communication Studies, Chapman University, Orange County, CA, USA.  My areas of research interest are intercultural communication, global communication, communication theory, Chinese communication and media, and the US-China relationship.  I also teach in these research areas.  I have a publication record of six academic books, 60 scholarly articles/book chapters/reviews/translations. I have made about 100 scholarly presentations, out of which six are keynote presentations, 54 guest presentations/guest instructions and 39 conference presentations. I have received about a dozen major research awards including one IAIR Early-Career Award, Wang-Fradkin Professorship award from Chapman University and half a dozen book awards and Choice “Outstanding Book” titles. Having reviewed for 30 some journals/publishers/research foundations, I am on the editorial boards of several prestigious journals including International Journal for Intercultural Relations and Asian Journal of Communication. I have also received more than a dozen interviews/news reports from various international media for my expertise. 

During my spare time, I have been consulting on brand communication and global business communication and a local international friendship city project.  I served as chair of the Faculty Personnel Council, interim department chair, and founding director of the Asian Studies Program at Chapman University. I have been an IAIR fellow since 2005 and on the IAIR Board since June 2013. Currently, I am authoring a book on global communication and editing a textbook reader on intercultural communication.  I love hiking with my family and friends, rock & roll, and jazz besides Peking Opera and Italian Opera and classic music.

 

Email: jia@chapman.edu
Website: http://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/wenshan-jia

Outstanding Book Award Committee

Rosita Albert

I grew up in Brazil, of European parents. I came to the U.S. as an exchange student in high school and became fascinated with the cultural differences between Brazil and the U.S. Thus, the world lost a terrible chemist when my Oberlin College advisor told me to focus on the subjects of psychology, sociology, and anthropology (since intercultural courses did not exist yet).

I received my PhD in social psychology from the University of Michigan. I then worked at the Center for Policy Research and taught at New York University and at Rutgers University. In 1974 I met Harry Triandis at the first SIETAR conference, and collaborated on a State of Illinois grant to conduct research on cultural differences between Latin Americans and North Americans. Although my husband had a job in Pennsylvania, I moved to Champaign/Urbana, Illinois to direct the project on interactions between Latino pupils and their North American teachers, and  then became as an assistant professor of educational psychology at Illinois. I published articles on Latino/Anglo American interactions in IJIR, contributed to two editions of the Landis et al. Handbook of Intercultural Training, and consulted for the World Bank and other organizations. Later I moved to the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota, where I continued to research Latino/Anglo communication and the Intercultural Sensitizer (Cultural Assimilator).

I am a founding member of IAIR, have attended all of its meetings, served on the editorial board of the IJIR for many years, and have been a member or chair of IAIR’s Membership Committee since the beginning of the Academy.  I also served on the Board of Directors of the Academy until 2011.  In 2013, a book I co-edited with Dan Landis titled the Handbook of Ethnic Conflicts: International Perspectives won the Academy’s Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award.

Past Presidents of the Academy

Dan Landis, President 1998-2005


 

I formally retired in 2002 after 40 years of teaching and researching cross-cultural psychology and intergroup relations at such institutions as Wisconsin State College at Oshkosh (now the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh),the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories in Philadelphia, the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, Indiana University–Purdue University in Indianapolis, and the University of Mississippi. I moved to Hawaii in 2002 and was appointedaffiliate professor at both the Manoa and Hilo campuses of the University of Hawaii, where I presently advise graduate students on their theses and dissertations. I completed my doctoral studies at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI (1963), which is also where I met and married Rae Morris, my wife of 53 years. Over my career, my research interests have spanned areas of cross-cultural training and research, the measurement of equal opportunity climate, individual-differences research and methodology, evaluation of social programs, development of theory in social psychology, and cross-cultural aspects of human sexuality. In 1977, I founded the interdisciplinary journal, the International Journal of Intercultural Relations (IJIR), and was its editor-in-chief for 35years (1977–2011). As a founding fellow of the Academy, I was elected its first president in 1997 and remained in that office for five years. I am currently the organization’s Executive Director and Treasurer. In 2007, I was honored to receive the Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award and, in 2011, to receive the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. I have edited three editions of the Handbook of Intercultural Training (1983, 1996, 2004) and most recently co-edited the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives with Rosita Albert.  This volume surveys 20 ethnic conflicts in-depth around the worldand was awarded the Academy’s 2013 Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award at the biennial conference in Reno, NV.Currently, I am working on two additional books: a fourth edition of the Handbook of Intercultural Training and a volume on the relationship of neuroscience and intercultural relations.(Profile adapted from the November 2012 issue of the American Psychologist, 67[8], 731-733.)

(Email) danl@hawaii.edu

(Web) http://www.interculturalacademy.org/briefbio.htm


Oliver Tzeng, President 2005-2007

I was born and raised in a rural Hakka subculture in Taiwan with its dialect as the mother tongue. However, my formal education was entirely in Mandarin with Chinese history, cultures, modern science and technologies for intellect progressions from K to 12 years. After college, I went to University of Wisconsin-Stout with two simple suitcases. Upon first arrival, the weather was unbearably cold in January 1968, while the cultural shocks and apprehensions were much “colder” – seemingly below the freezing point.   

In 1969, I was admitted to Psychology Graduate Programs (Quantitative and Psycholinguistics) at University of Illinois, and began the semantic differentials research under Professor Charles E. Osgood across 30 language-cultural communities around the world.  It was then beginning the deep appreciations of cultural diversities, and simultaneously uncovering the underlying principles in human universalities for attainable harmonizations.

At Illinois, I was profoundly influenced two intellectual giants – cultural contents and humanities by Osgood, and quantitative rigors and creativities by Ledyard Tucker. Consequently, for the past several decades, I have been devoted to three central themes in research and services: First, the development the Psychosemantic process model of human behaviors and its broad applications to all societal ecologies—from individuals, families, inter-groups to regional conflicts. Many books resulted from such endeavors, e.g., theories of child abuse and neglect, theories and measurements of intimate relationships and resolutions, 4th dimensional resolution of Taiwan-China conflicts in one-China conception; Second, systematic developments in quantitative methodologies for international communications research applications (models, strategies, and computer programming); Third, the developments of two internet websites -- for assessing adults’ intimate relationships under  and adolescents’ psychosemantics in personality, life satisfactions and self-confidence developments under www.eYouthPrism.com. Currently, five middle schools with over 5,000 students in Taiwan are using this cloud system for regular assessments of their students’ progress and school educational accountabilities. Its applications to the U.S. schools are underway.

I went back to school for legal education while directing a multidisciplinary graduate training program on child abuse and neglect at Indiana.  Such enrichment leads me to conscientiously put all social, psychological, communications and educational perspectives into a hard core of legal foundations and potential ramifications.

International Academy of Intercultural Research (IAIR) was cognized by Professor Dan Landis while he joined the Osgood team in 1970s.  Over the past three decades, and through Dan’s visions and intellectual abilities, the IAIR has matured and indeed become THE leading International Association with distinctive features offering the truly research-oriented, methodology-competent, and cultural context-based international platform.  Researchers, practitioners, educators, and policies makers across all geographic continents, demographic differences, and subjective cultural valuations can present their views, call for their equalities, and seek effective means to promote peace and to resolve inherent vulnerabilities.

Toward the IAIR’s mission, I am honored to have made some minor contributions over the years, especially as its president from 2005-2007.  Since IAIR’s mission is congruent with my personal aspirations, I pledge to continue my unwavering support of the organization.  In the contemporary digital era, new cultural contexts have exploded and divergent social values entangled.  Consequently, systematic analyses are more in need, and effective resolutions are more reliant upon the willingness of international scholars to cooperate, to integrate and to share their wisdoms.  For such reasons, I firmly believe so long as we uphold the IAIR’s integrities and promote its mission, all international scholars will make substantive contributions for both self-fulfillments and global-enrichments.

Email: OliverTLaw@aol.com

Website: www.eYouthPrism.com


Kenneth Cushner, President 2007-2009

I have been a professor of international and intercultural teacher education at Kent State University since 1987.  My presence there, however, goes back much further to when I was a freshman in the crowd of students who were fired upon on May 4th, 1970, hiding behind a car that had its windows shot out.  That was my ‘wake-up-call’ so to speak -- when I realized the need to understand alternative viewpoints rather than resorting to violence when there was a difference of opinion and belief. 

I taught in schools in Switzerland and Australia where I began traveling internationally with young people.  The need to ‘legitimize’ what I found to be transformative in the lives of young people led me to pursue a doctoral degree at the University of Hawaii through the East West Center where I studied with Richard Brislin.  I returned to Kent State University where, in addition to my teaching, have served as Associate Dean and Executive Director of International Affairs.

I am a Founding Fellow of IAIR, have served as a Board Member, Past President (2007 – 2009), hosted two conferences (1999 and 2005), and serve on the editorial board of IJIR.  My research interests continue to focus on the intercultural development of teachers and young people.  I am Director of COST – the Consortium of Overseas Student Teaching; a collaboration of 15 U.S. universities that send student teachers overseas, and was director of Semester at Sea’s Teachers at Sea program during the summers of 2010 and 2011.  My work with Richard Brislin and the culture-general assimilator (Intercultural interactions: A Practical Guide) has enabled me to consult with a wide range of organizations, including the U.S. Army Research Institute; the World Bank; ETIC – the Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation; and to receive a Fulbright to Sweden in 2008.  My teacher education textbook, Human Diversity in Education: An Intercultural Approach) will soon be published in its 8th edition.  In my spare time, I enjoy travel, photography, cycling, and when possible, still play percussion with my (now very old) rock and roll friends!

Email: kcushner@kent.edu

Website: www.kent.edu/ehhs; www.costprogram.org

Colleen Ward, President 2009-2011

I am a world wanderer—a bit odd since I am linguistically challenged (other than asking “how much?” and replying “too much!” in a few languages, I am embarrassingly monolingual). I started life in New Orleans, but went to the University of Durham, England, to obtain a PhD in Social Psychology. Then I put on the back-pack and kept travelling (with tropical islands being of particular interest).  I held an Organization of American States Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of the West Indies, Trinidad, and then took up my first academic appointment at the Science University of Malaysia in Penang. There I became a cross-cultural psychologist—purely out of necessity.  I could easily see that the American texts were not exactly what I needed to teach psychology in Malaysia, but I had no idea what to put in its place! I went on to Singapore and then spent three decades bouncing back and forth between the National University of Singapore and New Zealand—first at Canterbury University and more recently at Victoria University of Wellington, where I am a Co-Director of the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research.  My primary research interests are in acculturation and intercultural relations, and I was honoured in 2011 to be the recipient of the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Te Rangi Hiroa Medal for my work on cultural diversity. I am a former present of IAIR and am currently working on the third edition of The Psychology of Culture Shock, which is proving rather difficult, given my role as Editor of the International Journal of Intercultural Relations.

Email: colleen.ward@vuw.ac.nz

Website:http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/about-us/people/staff/colleen-ward

Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven, President 2011-2013

I have been a member of the IAIR for almost 2 decades. It started by becoming friends with Dan Landis on a post-conference tour in Israel.  We discussed intergroup relations issues in the Kibbutz in Golan. After that, Dan started sending me the Journal (IJIR) and invited me for a visit to Oxford Mississippi.  In Taiwan I was asked to become a Board member, and after organizing the conference in Groningen in 2007, Dan decided that I should be president of the IAIR. For me, the IAIR has been a kind of friendly and open intellectual family with an American touch where all members happen to be interested in the same topics as I have been. I have two main research interests: 1. Issues related to immigration and expatriate life, and 2. Aspects of life that may differ from nation to nation. I have studied national differences with respect to organization cultures, conflict management, using dirty words, and currently I’m involved in a 14-nations study about virtues and vices. The most appreciated virtue across the nations appears to be honesty. I’m now retired. I started academic life working as a social scientist in remote rural zones in Latin America. One of my current hobbies still is traveling to unexplored countries or zones. I tried playing golf, but after 80 lessons it’s still a total surprise for me where the ball drops. My wife Karen and I are shortly going to live in an apartment in swinging Amsterdam.

(Email) j.p.l.m.van.oudenhoven@rug.nl
(Web) http://www.rug.nl/staff/j.p.l.m.van.oudenhoven/research

 

Young Yun Kim, President  2013-2015

young yun kim

I am a professor of communication at the University of Oklahoma, teaching courses and directing dissertation studies in the area of intercultural and interethnic communication. As a founding fellow of the Academy, I have served as a member of the Board of Directors and as the Vice President/President-Elect, and now as the President. I also have been honored to be named a fellow of the International Communication Association and a Top Scholar for Lifetime Achievement in Intercultural Communication. I began studying the phenomenon of cross-cultural adaptation for my doctoral dissertation (1976) at Northwestern University in Illinois. I have since conducted original studies among other immigrants, refugees, and ethnic minorities in the United States. These original studies, along with the numerous published works across social science disciplines, provided empirical grounding for the integrative theory of cross-cultural adaptation, developed first in Communication and Cross-Cultural Adaptation (1988) and further refined in Becoming Intercultural (2001). Over the past two decades, I have extended my research domain to issues of race and ethnicity within a society, carrying out a series of original studies investigating various psychological, situational, and macro-environmental factors influencing communication behaviors of individuals when they encounter ethnically dissimilar others. These research efforts are reflected in the initial rendition of the contextual theory of interethnic communication (2005), which is currently being fully elaborated and illustrated in a book manuscript. Some of the non-academic activities I deeply enjoy are attending classical concerts/operas and backpacking deep in the wilderness.

Email: youngkim@ou.edu
Website: http://cas.ou.edu/young-kim


Members of the Academy

Jeffrey C. Ady

While finishing my MA in communication studies at Washington State University, I met my then-future wife, an exchange student from Japan, and my interculturalism began in full force. After I earned my MA and married my fiancé, Robert Klopf, veteran researcher in cross-cultural communication and psychology, urged me to study intercultural communication at the doctoral level. So I went to the University of Kansas and studied that along with organizational communication. From there I went to the University of Hawaii at Manoa. After 23 years there, I now am with the Public Administration program and teach graduate courses in communication, leadership, and intercultural challenges in public service.

Marrying intercuturally and living in Hawaii is a far cry from my growing up on my family’s cattle ranches in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. But there are analogs. Where once I helped haul hay to cattle in very rough country, I now bring the intercultural perspective to students who truly appreciate it. What once were spring brandings are now getting my masters students ready to graduate each May. I call myself an interculturalist, and am constantly attempting to bring the intercultural perspective into the disciplines of political science, public policy studies, comparative public administration, and public administration itself. It’s a significant challenge. But interculturalism is so worth the challenge that I’ll always be an indefatigable proponent of global effectiveness.

The Academy is without question my favorite academic association, and I have been a Founding Fellow since 1998.

Email: jady@hawaii.edu

Rosita Albert

I grew up in Brazil, of European parents. I came to the U.S. as an exchange student in high school and became fascinated with the cultural differences between Brazil and the U.S. Thus, the world lost a terrible chemist when my Oberlin College advisor told me to focus on the subjects of psychology, sociology, and anthropology (since intercultural courses did not exist yet).

I received my PhD in social psychology from the University of Michigan. I then worked at the Center for Policy Research and taught at New York University and at Rutgers University. In 1974 I met Harry Triandis at the first SIETAR conference, and collaborated on a State of Illinois grant to conduct research on cultural differences between Latin Americans and North Americans. Although my husband had a job in Pennsylvania, I moved to Champaign/Urbana, Illinois to direct the project on interactions between Latino pupils and their North American teachers, and  then became as an assistant professor of educational psychology at Illinois. I published articles on Latino/Anglo American interactions in IJIR, contributed to two editions of the Landis et al. Handbook of Intercultural Training, and consulted for the World Bank and other organizations. Later I moved to the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota, where I continued to research Latino/Anglo communication and the Intercultural Sensitizer (Cultural Assimilator).

I am a founding member of IAIR, have attended all of its meetings, served on the editorial board of the IJIR for many years, and have been a member or chair of IAIR’s Membership Committee since the beginning of the Academy.  I also served on the Board of Directors of the Academy until 2011.  In 2013, a book I co-edited with Dan Landis titled the Handbook of Ethnic Conflicts: International Perspectives won the Academy’s Gudykunst Outstanding Book Award.

Email:Alber001@umn.edu
Website: http://www.comm.umn.edu/faculty/profile.php?UID=alber001

Maria-Assumpta Aneas

 

I am lecturer at the Department of Methods of Research and Assessment in Education at the University of Barcelona.  I did my PhD about Intercultural Competencies in 2003. This was the first research about this topic in Spain.  My research interests are focused on the assessment of competencies and the analysis of transdisciplinary processes. In this sense, for me, the study and training of intercultural relations involve transdisciplinary processes. I have applied this interest on projects about immigration, organizations, and the university.  Perhaps for this reason all of these projects have been done with colleagues from other knowledge areas (engineering, sociology and psychology). Most of my international projects are developed with universities in Latin America.I volunteer for two NGOs (Comunidad de San Egido and Banco de Alimentos). Also, I participate actively in a project for citizenship participation (Parlament ciutadà). I love independent cinema, architecture and dancing.  I have been a member of IAIR since 2000.  I was the first member of the Academy from Spain. I attended the Groningen Congress, where I presented two of my publications promoted by colleagues from the Academy: Aneas, A, Garreta, J & Molina, F. (2012) Morrocos in Spain, so near yet so far. In Dan Landis, Rosita Albert & Amy McWhinney “Handbook of Ethnocultural Conflict (Springer). The other book is Arhur, N. & Pedersen, P. (2008). Case Incident 11: Integration and Identity, published by the American Counseling Association.

Email: aaneas@ub.edu
Website: http://barcelona.academia.edu/AssumptaAneas

Soon Ang

I obtained my Ph.D. from the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. I hold the Goh Tjoei Kok Distinguished Chaired Professor in Management at the Nanyang Business School, in Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. I head the Division of Strategy, Management & Organization. I'm also the Executive Director of the Center Leadership + Cultural Intelligence at NTU, the world’s first research center on cultural intelligence and leadership.

I pioneered and co-authored two books on cultural intelligence published by Stanford University Press. My current research focuses on leadership development and the role of cultural intelligence in wide ranging domains including businesses, military and international education. The research center I oversee leads in creating evidence-based assessments and interventions for growing cultural intelligence in individuals, schools and organizations.

I am currently a founding associate editor for the Academy of Management’s newest and most innovative journal – the Academy of Management Discoveries. I curate evidence-based, phenomenal driven research with emphasis on culture and international OB.

I've served as the Senior Editor of MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, Journal of the Association of IS, Consulting Editor ofManagement and Organization Review, and Associate Editor of Decision Sciences, and Cross Cultural Management.

I publish in top academic journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Management Science, MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, Organization Science, Social Forces, and others.

I've been involved in research for major corporations, military and government bodies.  I received the Public Administrative Medal (Silver) from the Republic of Singapore; the Distinguished Leadership Award for International Alumni for the University of Minnesota; the first Nanyang Award for Research and Innovation in the Social Sciences. I received the Association of Information Systems (AIS) Fellow Award.

I have presented cultural intelligence research at the IAIR conferences, and have contributed to editorial work for the Association’s flagship journal IJIR.

Email: asang@ntu.edu.sg
Website: http://soonang.com/

Lily A. Arasaratnam

I am currently based at Alphacrucis College in Sydney Australia. In addition to teaching intercultural communication and research methods, I oversee the running of one of our Masters programs. My undergraduate degrees (one in Psychology, one in Mathematics) and my Masters (in Communication) are from the University of Kentucky, and my PhD is from Rutgers University. I was assistant professor at Oregon State University and lecturer at Macquarie University prior to my current position. My cultural background is diverse; born in Sri Lanka, schooling in the Maldives, university education in the USA and now a citizen of Australia. I have been a member of IAIR since 2010, and I very much enjoyed attending the 2013 conference in Reno.

My primary area of research is intercultural communication, particularly culture-general approaches to understanding intercultural communication competence. I am also interested in multiculturalism and migration. So far I have achieved two goals on my “bucket list” (to deliberately use an idiom that doesn’t translate well across cultures!), namely, to complete my PhD before the age of 30, and to publish a book before 40. The first was achieved in 2003 and the second in 2011. Few more goals are yet to be achieved before 40! My other interests include reading fiction, creating and experiencing different foods, watching films, and dancing. While I am trained in classical Indian dancing, I also enjoy folk, ballroom, and Latin dances. In general, I see my life as a holistic integration of spirituality, relationships, and intellectual pursuits.

Email: lily.arasaratnam@ac.edu.au
Website: http://ac.edu.au/faculty-and-staff/lily-a-arasaratnam/

Philip Auter

I’ve always been interested in travel and the diversity and excitement of our big wide world, but I’ve only had the opportunity to travel and work with friends and colleagues around the world for about 15 years. Working with friends, I began to develop research, teaching, and consulting opportunities—slowly at first—but bit by bit I was given the opportunity to attend conferences, work with colleagues and students, and make new friends all over the world. My colleagues and I were fortunate to be awarded a USAID Middle East Partnership Initiative grant that partnered ULL with Qatar University for 5 years of joint research, teaching, and service. Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to visit Japan, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Lebanon, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, Kazakhstan, and the United Arab Emirates, to name a few. 

I am a professor of international, intercultural, and mass communication. My experience is both at the undergraduate and graduate level in traditional, hybrid, and online courses—some of which I’ve co-taught with international colleagues. One of my new passions is distance learning.

I love international communication research, service, teaching, and consulting. With advances in the Internet and mobile communication over the last decade or so, it has become easier to connect with colleagues and make friends around the world. I look forward to meeting, making friends with, and working with many of you on a variety of research, teaching, service, and consulting projects.

Please follow me at:
Email: philauter@gmail.com
LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/philauter
Academia: louisiana.academia.edu/PhilipAuter
Skype/Twitter/Google+/Facebook: philauter

Hasan Aydin

I earned my BA in English in 2005 and I received my MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in 2007 and I hold my PhD in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in multicultural education in 2011 from the University of Nevada, Reno. Currently, I am an Assistant Professor of Multicultural Education at Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.  My areas of expertise and academic interests are multicultural / intercultural education curriculum including: immigration, cultural integration and assimilation of Turkish immigrants in the E.U. and the U.S.; international education, diversity; ethnic identity; second language acquisition; and teaching online classes with Web 2.0 technology.  I am an editor of Multicultural Education: Diversity, Pluralism, and Democracy published in 2013, and I am also a co-author of Cultural Integration of Turkish Women in the Netherlands published in 2012 by LAMBERT Academic Publishing. I have published several peer-reviewed journal articles and have presented at national and international conferences. I also serve as an editor of numerous peer-reviewed journals, including: The International Journal of Multicultural Education (IJME), National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME), and Journal of Educational Research and Essays (ERE).  I am a member of the International Academy for Intercultural Research (IAIR) since 2010, and have twice attended the IAIR international conference. My hobbies are traveling, reading books, and chatting with friends.

Email: aydinh@yildiz.edu.tr  
Website: http://www.yarbis.yildiz.edu.tr/aydinh

David J. Bachner

My research has focused on international educational exchange program pedagogy and effects. This interest developed in natural tandem with my intercultural living and work experiences: university student in Japan, Peace Corps volunteer in Korea, Peace Corps intercultural trainer in Hawaii, Vice President/Programs and later Trustee of Youth For Understanding (YFU) International Exchange, Dean of Global Studies (as well as Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs & Dean of Faculty) at Hartwick College, where I am Dean Emeritus, and, until my recent retirement, a professor of International Communication at American University’s School of International Service, where I continue to chair the Advisory Council of SIS’s Intercultural Management Institute. I served as a consulting editor of IJIR and became an IAIR fellow in the organization’s early years. My doctoral work in Organizational Behavior, completed in 1975 with an emphasis on inter-group relations, has strongly influenced my intercultural research and practice throughout my career.

Email: davidj.bachner@gmail.com

An Ran

I got my Ph.D. in multicultural education at University of Reading, in 1999, then I worked as a lecturer at the National Centre for Language and Literacy at University of Reading. In 2004, I came back to China and have been Dean of the School of International Education at South China University of Technology. I am also Director of Confucius Institute at the South China University of Technology and initiated the establishment of a Confucius Institute at Lancaster University. I was promoted to Professor in 2006 and my main research interests are multicultural education and intercultural communication. Currently, I am the principal researcher on two projects. One is the study of intercultural adaptation of Chinese staff at Confucius Institutes, the other is the study of influence power of Confucius Institutes. My research interests are intercultural communication and multicultural education. I have published over 50 papers and have been the (co)author and (co)editor of 12 books. I also like to write poems and have published two poem collections. I am the Board member of China Association of Intercultural Communication and a member of the International Advisory Board for IAICS (International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies). I joined IAIR as a member in 2011.

Email: sieanran@scut.edu.cn
Website: http://www2.scut.edu.cn/sie/

David Balosa

I am a doctoral student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) in the Language, Literacy, and Culture (LLC) Program. I hold a Master of Science (MS) degree in TESOL from the University of Pennsylvania (2003). I also have a MS in education from LaSalle University (2007) and a Pennsylvania K-12 teaching license in French from Chestnut Hill College. My research interests include sociolinguistics, political discourse analysis, critical intercultural communication theory, and postcolonial theory.  Within sociolinguistics, I examine language domination in multilingual/multicultural societies. I am specifically studying the political discourse of the debate over the status of English and Spanish in the States during the presidential campaign 2008 to present.  In respect to critical intercultural communication theory, I am interested in the theory of intercultural justice and the way it may contribute to intercultural communication studies’ understanding and explanation of intercultural communication competence for the sake of “common good” beyond communicative performance. Finally, in postcolonial theory, I am interested in Frantz Fanon’s theory of new humanism. In my free time, I write poems, play soccer, ride bicycle, spend time in the park, and watch sports on TV. I also enjoy watching international news. I have a drive for intercultural justice and intercultural research and have spent hours searching for scholars and institutions who may share their insights on these subjects. In March 2013, I was blessed that my computer search engine brought up the IAIR conference in Reno, Nevada. I did not think twice to register for a membership and to submit a paper for the Reno 2013 IAIR conference. I am now a happy and satisfied member of this world-class academy of distinguished scholars.

Email: Dbalosa1@umbc.edu
Website: http://www.clegp.org/index.php/about-us/about-the-president

Linda Beamer

Who I’ve Beenmight be a more accurate label now that I retired from teaching three years ago.  My research for the past three decades has been into intercultural communication in a business context, with a focus on the effect of those cultural dimensions that are most important in business interactions on communication effectiveness.  As the wife of a Chinese expatriate, I have had a cultural interpreter’s lessons about Chinese culture—and my own experiences of it.  The textbook I co-authored is in its 5th edition, and I’ve contributed over two dozen articles to intercultural business communication scholarship from linguistic pragmatics, schema theory, politeness theory, and cultural variables theory.  My PhD was in renaissance English literature; my interest in intercultural communication developed as the direct result of studying and working in various international locations: Canada, US, Scotland, Japan, China, Argentina, Mexico, the West Bank, and New Zealand where we now live.  As a full professor at California State University, Los Angeles, I achieved a number of awards, including Outstanding Professor.  For 35 years I have been a member and ex-president of the Association for Business Communication, and became a member of IAIR at the founding conference in 1997 in Fullerton, CA.  At present in Auckland I continue to serve as Associate Editor of JBC, editorial reviewer for several journals including IJIR, and dissertation examiner.  I’ve been a choral singer for most of my life, but now have a challenging new passion: change ringing in the only Auckland bell tower.

Email: l.beamer@xtra.co.nz

Milton Bennett

With a physics background from Stanford University, psycholinguistics from San Francisco State University, and social science training at the University of Minnesota (Ph.D. Communication Studies/Sociology), I have over my career attempted to nurture a philosophy of science perspective within the field of intercultural relations. My current work as a founding director of the Intercultural Development Research Institute is to support and disseminate research in quantum/constructivist paradigm solutions to intercultural problems, including a focus on developmental approaches to intercultural learning in educational exchange and intercultural ethicality in global business leadership.

In 1997 I was part of the organizing committee for the IAIR, and thus became a “founding fellow.” At the time, the SIETAR was fragmenting and complaints were growing that IJIR was not relevant to intercultural practitioners. I was co-director of the Intercultural Communication Institute in Portland, Oregon, which my father had funded in 1986 as non-profit professional development organization. Already by 1997 ICI had become very practitioner-oriented, so neither it nor SIETAR really offered a forum for new research. I hoped that a new organization would really focus on intercultural theory and research, would support the journal, and would draw practitioners who were serious about staying current in those realms.  For the most part, IAIR has fulfilled that potential and, while appropriately not supplanting SIETAR, has continued to complement the practitioner side.

Currently I live part-time in Milan, Italy and part-time in Oregon, USA with my wife, Ida Castiglioni, and our 6-year-old son Leonardo.  In Oregon I keep up my instrument pilot rating and we ply the skies in the same Piper Archer I’ve owned since 1980. In Italy, I stay on the ground, albeit whenever possible on steep ski slopes in the Italian Alps.

Email: Milton.bennett@idrinstitute.org
Website: www.idrinstitute.org

Janet Bennett

A long time ago, in a land far, far away, I found myself living for two years on a tropical island one-mile square in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. As a member of the U. S. Peace Corps, my worldview was transformed from being a child of the seventies into a global soul. And that has shaped my subsequent career.

Many years ago, I joined Dan Landis and a team of educators to conceptualize IAIR, with the intention of bringing interculturalists in several disciplines together. 

For the last twenty-five years, I have served as the executive director of the Intercultural Communication Institute, sponsor of the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication, and director of the Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Relations jointly sponsored by ICI and the University of the Pacific. My recent publications have focused on intercultural competence, training of trainers, and the integration of diversity and global initiatives. I am truly enjoying editing the SAGE Encyclopedia of Intercultural Competence as well.

Recently, I have been teaching about intercultural competence to international development and relief workers based throughout the world, and formulating curriculum for several trainer corps groups established in government agencies.

For those of us who appreciate the pleasure of working across cultures, we scarcely need to cultivate hobbies. However, my passion for folk crafts, especially weaving, always gives me a unique window into various cultures.

Email: jbennett@intercultural.org
Website: http://www.intercultural.org/jbennett.php

Jeffrey Berlin

 

Many of my professional and personal circumstances can be directly attributed to the academy.  It was my great fortune to work with Dr. Sharon Glazer on my MS in industrial/organizational psychology at San Jose State University.  Dr. Glazer recommended the IAIR conference in Groningen as a wonderful opportunity to present my thesis research: Social support and job satisfaction across 14 countries.  This conference was truly a life-changing experience as I was exposed to a community of like-minded individuals sharing a passion for ‘all-things-cultural.’ It was here I met my future dissertation advisor, Dr. Dharm Bhawuk.

Subsequently, I completed my MS and worked as a Development Specialist at NASA for three and a half years.  In this role, I was an internal consultant working in the realms of organizational development, training, leadership development, and career development.

In 2009, Dr. Bhawuk graciously accepted my request to volunteer at the IAIR conference in Honolulu, Hawai`i.  In 2010, I was accepted into the Community and Cultural Concentration at the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, where I am currently working on my dissertation research: A critical, mixed-method analysis of the relationship between study abroad and global citizenship. My post-dissertation goals involve blending my passions for organizational development, culture, and study abroad.

I am grateful to live on the beautiful North Shore of O`ahu with my wonderful girlfriend, Courtney.  It is here I enjoy surfing, hiking, running, and beach-sits.  Aloha.

Email: jberlin@hawaii.edu

Dina Birman

I received my Ph.D. in clinical/community psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a B.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University. Currently, I am an associate professor in the Community and Prevention Research Division, in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. In January 2014 I will be moving to the Department of Educational and Psychological Studies at the University of Miami to direct the new Ph.D. program in Community Well Being.  As a former refugee from the former Soviet Union, I conduct research to give “voice” to the migration experience.  As a Community Psychologist, I view the adjustment of immigrants and refugees from the perspective of person-environment fit. While a great deal of research documents the challenges faced by immigrants and refugees, I study the ways in which the environments where the acculturation process unfolds serve as a barrier or facilitator of adjustment, and can be the targets of intervention efforts. I have published my research in professional journals, and recently was a co-author of the APA report Crossroads:  The Psychology of Immigration in the New Century (2012).  Prior to working in academia, I had worked in the Refugee Mental Health Program at the National Institute of Mental Health and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, providing consultation and technical assistance on mental health issues to the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). I continue to provide consultation to mental health and resettlement workers and teachers in communities impacted by refugees.

Preferred email address:  dbirman@uic.edu

After January 2014:  d.birman@miami.edu

Birgit Breninger

I am the Head of our Postgraduate Intercultural Programmes (ICC) at the University of Salzburg in Austria, which I founded together with my dear colleague Prof. Udeani from Nigeria in 2005. Currently I am also a Senior Lecturer at the Communication Studies Department of the University of Salzburg. Last year I set up and established together with our enthusiastic ICC team the Intercultural College (www.intercultural-college.at) at which research, education and social responsibility projects go hand in hand to contribute to the development of a more responsible society. In autumn 2014 we launch our first intercultural programme offer for international students (www.uni-salzburg.at/icc) at the Intercultural College and we are most excited about it! I am a passionate researcher who is particularly interested in bridging the gap between the social and natural sciences when investigating culture. My research efforts focus on the change in perception and cognition when acquiring intercultural competence, as documented by a multi-method approach (eyetracking, questionnaire and fMRI). Culturalized perception and its analysis lie at the heart of Dr. Kaltenbacher’s and my collaborative research projects. I thoroughly enjoy travelling, meeting people, reading poetry and going on picnics.I am very much looking forward to the time as a member of IAIR!

Email: birgit.breninger@sbg.ac.at

Benjamin Broome

Greetings from the beautiful desert landscape of Arizona, where I enjoy hiking, photography, and sitting against a rock in the late afternoon sun watching the colors change on the mountain slopes and canyon walls. My involvement in the field of intercultural communication started in 1976, when I had the good fortune to learn from many of the founding fathers and mothers of the field at the Stanford Institute for Intercultural Communication, hosted by IAIR member Clifford Clarke. It wasn’t until 2008 that I became a Fellow of the Academy, but I’ve been an admirer and supporter of Dan Landis since the very first issue of IJIR. I still have on my bookshelf the early volumes of this pioneering journal, and I show Volume 1, Issue 1 to my students as a historical artifact from the Enlightenment era.

I carry proudly and humbly the title of professor in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communicationat Arizona State University, where I teach courses on intercultural communication, intergroup conflict, peacebuilding, and facilitation. I engage in participatory action research that focuses on methods and practices for facilitating intercultural dialogue. I’ve had opportunities to facilitate more than 100 workshops in North America, Europe, the eastern Mediterranean, and Australasia, working with educational institutions, policy centers, government agencies, corporations, professional organizations, community groups, and indigenous Tribes and organizations. I have been involved with peacebuilding efforts in the eastern Mediterranean for over twenty years, working closely with civil-society actors and the diplomatic community to promote a culture of peace, where individuals, groups, and organizations respond to conflict through dialogue rather than resorting to psychological, social, and physical violence. If you are interested to learn more about the work of peacebuilders in this region, you can download Building Bridges Across the Green Linefrom the website of Action for Cooperation and Trust, United Nations Development Program in Cyprus. It is available at no charge, in English, Greek, and Turkish.

Email: benjamin.broome@asu.edu
Website: http://humancommunication.clas.asu.edu/node/78

Dominic Busch

 

Currently, I am a professor in intercultural communication and conflict research at Universität der Bundeswehr München, which is a federal university primarily teaching military officers in Germany. Although my classes are part of courses in education, my own approach comes from discourse studies, conversation analysis as well as cultural philosophy/cultural theory in general, however with a focus on critical perspectives. My discourse-focused research starts from the assumption that the notion of culture as well as the issue of intercultural research and debate itself are cultural products. Referring to Foucault, I recently have published a monographdescribing the intercultural debate as one of Michel Foucault’s dispositifs: a debate that sometimes suffers from a strong and exclusive self-centeredness serving other goals than e.g. cross-cultural understanding. Here, approaches from ethnomethodology and conversation analysis may be applied in a way that is sensitive to the dispositive – suggesting some ideas to better cope with the discursive dilemma. Beyond this, I do some research on conflict mediation in intercultural settings. I came to IAIR presenting some work at the 2005 conference at Kent State University in Ohio. Unfortunately, I was not able to attend any later conferences, but I hope I will in the future. Besides from academia, I enjoy life with my wife and our two little daughters.

Email: dominic.busch@unibw.de
Website: http://www.unibw.de/dominic.busch

Elirea Bornman

I am a research professor at the University of South Africa (Unisa). Unisa is situated in the beautiful city of Pretoria in the center of the country.  A short drive will take you into the African bush where wildlife abounds. This is my world and I love it. Although I am at heart a social psychologist, I am attached to the Department of Communication Science where I used to teach research methodology and international communication. From 2013 I am in the privileged position that I can dedicate all my time to research. My main research interest is social identification processes and intergroup relations in post-apartheid South Africa. Lately, I have also been involved in research on nation-building and symbolic conflict as well as issues related to language and identity. I am furthermore particularly interested in the methodology of survey research. The great loves of my life are my three Maltese dogs who see to it that there is no lack of drama and excitement in my life. I try to keep fit by going to the gym regularly, and the dogs force me to go for a walk in the park every afternoon. As a reborn Christian I am involved in the activities of my local church.  I furthermore love reading ˗ mostly Afrikaans and international literature and the works of Scandinavian crime writers. I furthermore try not to miss any opportunity to go to the theatre and am a staunch supporter of the Springboks and Blue Bulls rugby teams.

Email: bornme@unisa.ac.za
Website: http://www.unisa.ac.za/Default.asp?Cmd=ViewContent&ContentID=1225

Richard Bourhis

As a Montreal French Canadian, I received my primary schooling in French until my parents decided to send me to English high school. As I knew no English my parents sent me to the YMCA summer camp for a month to learn English, which I did more or less just in time to begin high school in English. It is from this moment that I became aware of bilingualism/biculturalism, which for a 12-year-old kid was a swim or sink adventure.  I loved intercultural relations so much that to this day I cannot envisage living in other than multilingual/multicultural environments. After high school, I did my BS degree in psychology at McGill University where I published my first papers on bilingual communication with Wallace Lambert, Don Taylor, and Howard Giles who was on a visit from the University of Bristol. So I completed my PhD on communication accommodation theory and social identity theory with Howard Giles with funding from Henri Tajfel. As associate professor, I taught social psychology at McMaster University in Ontario and then joined the Psychology Department at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) where I teach in French as full professor. I joined the IAIR in 1997 thanks to the invitation of Dan Landis and enjoy participating in a number of IAIR conferences while publishing regularly in the IJIR, especially on host majority acculturation orientations towards valued and devalued immigrants. In 2008, I received the Robert C. Gardner Award for my research on bilingualism from the International Association of Language and Social Psychology and an award of distinction from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation.In 2010, I received a doctorate ‘Honoris causa’ from the Université de Lorraine, France while in 2012, I was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and I received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for contributions to Canada.

Email: bourhis.richard@uqam.ca
Website: http://bourhis.socialpsychology.org

Donal Carbaugh

I am a professor of communication, former chair of the International Studies Council and director of the graduate program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. My special interests are in the ethnographic study of intercultural interactions and in discerning in them, cultural philosophies of communication, especially as these address issues of identity, nature, and spirit. I have explored these in some detail as they pertain to Russian, Blackfeet (Native American), Finnish, and US American ways. One outcome of this is the book, Cultures in Conversation – designated the Outstanding Book of the Year by the International and Intercultural Communication Division of the National Communication Association (NCA). The theoretical framework developing in these studies has been the subject of recent discussions in the Journal of Multicultural Discourses and Language and Intercultural Communication. Some recent works have examined cultural ideas about dialogue in several languages with a chapter about that by Sleap and Sener appearing in their recent book, Dialogue Theories, alongside others about Martin Buber, David Bohm, Jurgen Habermas, the Dalai Lama, and Daniel Yankelovich. I have been most active in NCA and the International Communication Association and am looking forward to becoming better involved in the important and interesting work of the Academy. Montana, especially Glacier National Park and the Blackfeet Reservation, hold great appeal to me, a place where I once guided tours and now enjoy hiking and “listening to nature.”

Email: Carbaugh@comm.umass.edu
Website: http://works.bepress.com/donal_carbaugh/

Patricia A. Cassiday

Patricia A. Cassiday is a cross-cultural consultant and coach, specializing in transition for individuals and families.  Patricia’s unique perspective is enhanced by the experience of living abroad for 17 of the past 25 years. She has published numerous articles and co-authored with Donna Stringer: 52 Activities for Exploring Values Differences (2003),52 Activities for Improving Cross Cultural Communication (2009) and she is currently working on 52 Activities for Successful International Relocation (due from Intercultural Press in October, 2014).

Tricia has been a member of the Academy since 2001. In 2002, her dissertation, “Leadership in International Settings: Exploring the Values, Beliefs and Assumptions of Expatriates,” was recognized by the Academy. She presented her research findings at the IAIR conference in Taiwan in 2003, as well as numerous conferences in Japan, Germany and the USA.

Tricia loves photography, kayaking and hiking in the woods of the Pacific Northwest.  You will find her teaching a course, Training for International Transition, at the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication during the summer of 2014.

Email: cassiday@collaborativeconnection.org
Webstie: www.collaborativeconnection.org

Ida Castiglioni

I’m a professor of sociology (cultural processes and communication) in the Department of Sociology and Social Research, University of Milano-Bicocca. At UMB I designed and teach the graduate specialization of intercultural relations in the Programming and Management of Social Services and Public Policies program. I’m responsible for the internationalization of the program and for the Erasmus+ EU exchange program. I graduated summa cum laude with a laurea in political science from the University of Milano, and I hold a PhD in intercultural communication from the University of Jyväskylä (Finland). In addition to my work at the university, I’m a therapist with a master’s degree in somatic psychology and a certificate in clinical counseling.

I have conducted programs for both corporations and public institutions in Europe, Africa, the Russian Federation, NIS countries, and the United States, and I am a founding director of the Intercultural Development Research Institute (IDRI), whose mission is to sponsor new theory and research in intercultural development, to formalize a developmental approach to intercultural adaptation, and to inform public discourse with scientific study of intercultural relations.

My most recent book is Constructing Intercultural Competence in Italian Social Service and Healthcare Organizations (University of Jyväskylä Press, 2013), and my earlier book, La Comunicazione Interculturale: Competenze e Pratiche (Intercultural Communication: Competences and Practices), is a best-seller in Italy.

I spend time both in Italy and in Oregon, USA with my husband Milton J. Bennett and our 8 years old bilingual and bicultural son. After a lot of travelling, I still like doing it, while I practice meditation and body work.

Email: ida.castiglioni@idrinstitute.org


Andreas Önver Cetrez

You will notice that I am strongly interested in the areas of migration and acculturation. Not surprisingly, as I have roots in the Assyrian minority group from Turkey, but migrated to Sweden at the age of 9, thus being both multilingual and multicultural in my bones. Currently I hold a senior lecturer position at the Faculty of Theology, Uppsala University, Sweden, specializing in psychology of religion and cultural psychology.

In 2005 I finished my doctoral dissertation, focusing on meaning and ritualization among Assyrian migrants in Sweden. Since then I have been teaching at the same faculty, primarily on courses in mixed methods, but also on topics such as migration, health, and the role of religion in violence. During several years I coordinated a master program in Religion, Peace, and Conflict. I have edited several anthologies, among these one in the psychology of religion, one on Assyrian identity, and a more general book on borders of knowledge.

I have been a member of the IAIR since 2005. During the last three years I have led a research project on migration, acculturation, and health among Iraqi refugees in Sweden. I have recently started a similar project on Syrian refugees, but this time among people who are in a transitional space as refugees in Istanbul, Turkey. As a student I had the opportunity to visit several universities and experience other cultures closely. However, I didn’t only bring with me the academic skills from abroad. Additionally, from Buenos Aires I brought with me some steps in tango, from Honolulu the scuba diving, and from Geneva the skiing.

Email: cetrez@teol.uu.se
Website: http://katalog.uu.se/empinfo/?id=N96-5719

Darius Chan

I received my PhD in social and organizational psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I had the privilege to work with Dr. Harry Triandisand first developed my interests in cross-cultural research.

After my PhD,I returned to my hometown of Hong Kongand have beenteaching in the psychology department at the Chinese University of Hong Kongfor the past two decades.I have served on the editorial boards of various journals, including Management and Organizational Review, Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, and Acta Psychologia Sinica. I have been a Fellow of the Academy since 1999. Currently, I am also director of the Assessment and Training Centre at the university, where we provide organizational consultancy services to corporate clients, NGOs, and the government.

My current research focuses on two broad areas. One is on culture andinterpersonal relationships, as a continuation of my interest in cross-cultural psychology. The second one revolves around social issues that many local young people are facing, including youth unemploymentand wealth inequality. We have secured government funding on examining the psychological mechanisms of such phenomena and their potential associations with negativity toward the rich and intentions for collective action.
During leisure time, I like water sports. When summer comes, I will go snorkeling, kayaking, or wakeboardingon a regular basis.

Email: dchan@cuhk.edu.hk
Website: http://www.psy.cuhk.edu.hk/index.php/en/people/teaching-staff/11-people/144-chan-darius-kwan-shing

Anand Chandrasekar Narayanan

 

As an electrical and electronics engineer in India, I stumbled into the world of organizational behaviour when I moved to Singapore and joined Nanyang Technological University. There has been no turning back since. I continue to enjoy my journey in the intercultural field, seeking answers to interesting questions, meeting and interacting with wonderful people.

I am a senior research faculty with the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) in Singapore while simultaneously seeking to complete my doctoral dissertation from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I view my research as happening at the intersection of the areas of leadership development, positive psychology, and Indian psychology. In addition to my research on understanding the meaning of generosity in the Indian context and its relationship to leadership development, I develop assessment instruments, and evaluate the impact of leadership development efforts.

My involvement with the Academy began when I was introduced to IAIR by Vijayan Munusamy. My involvement with IAIR has grown steadily, and I am now its webmaster. I knew very little about managing a website when I started, but thanks to the trust that Dan Landis and other Board members placed in me, I have enjoyed managing the IAIR website for about three years now while learning in the process.

I am never far away from research, spending most of my “leisure” time in a search into myself. Aided in this re-search by the learning and teaching of the Bhagavad Gita and other Hindu philosophical texts, my wife, and my quickly-growing-up daughter, life indeed is research in progress.

Email: anandc@hawaii.edu
Websites: http://www.ccl.org/leadership/news/bios/anandChandrasekar.aspxsg.linkedin.com/in/anandchandrasekar/

Ruobing Chi

Born in an autonomous region in Inner Mongolia, growing up in a typical communist factory community, and migrating to the metropolis of Shanghai for college education, I am shaped by each of these unique cultural contexts along the way. When entering graduate school, I did not hesitate to choose intercultural communication as the direction to specialize on, and it has since been a keyword in my life. My MA supervisor and mentor Prof. Steve Kulich showed me, in person and his teaching, how much difference intercultural experiences and education can make, which keeps motivating me today. It is through his introduction and with his encouragement that I became a member of IAIR and attended my first IAIR conference in 2005 at Kent State University. 

Recently I completed the interdisciplinary PhD program in communication and information sciences at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. I was lucky to have lived and completed my dissertation research at the East West Center. Many friends there shared their cultural stories with me, and through them I learned the true meaning of aloha (love and compassion) and o’hana (family).

Now, working as a full-time fellow at the intercultural institute of Shanghai International Studies University, I am committed to developing myself professionally as a researcher and teacher. I hope that my research on social relational networks as both means and ends for multicultural integration can be helpful for an increasingly diverse world and especially for those being studied. I also hope that I can make my academic experience useful to my students through teaching and mentoring.

 

Email: crbcherry@gmail.com

Clifford Clarke

I am a product of Japanese and American heritage and upbringing, but my orientation is more Japanese when it comes to human relationships.  Challenging cultural assumptions has been my favorite pastime since childhood.  I chose to become a bridge-between-cultures when I was 10 years old in Kyoto, and so focused my knowledge and skills to become effective in this capacity in my formal education at Wake Forest, ICU, Duke, and Stanford. 

My four careers have been in foreign student counseling, intercultural communication teaching, intercultural business management, and educational program evaluation.  I have been involved in many more professional organizations, the latest being IAIR. I have only attended the Honolulu conference but long to visit Bergen again. I’ve loved traveling to 36 countries and have enjoyed learning from friends in their diversity of cultures.  My loving wife is from Japan to which we will return in 2016 after she finishes her PhD in educational psychology. 

I have enjoyed teaching for 13 years and serving over 300 multicultural organizations in 18 countries for 30 years.  I’ve employed research as the foundation of my consulting, training, and coaching in order to be grounded in the experiences of my client organization.  I’ve been uniquely privy to multi-year contracts that required my engagement within organizations in their real-time interactions across cultures.  My research has always been focused on business functions in the multicultural context toward the goal of mutual understanding that enables the discovery of synergistic values and behaviors that lead to performance improvements of the client organization.

Email: chclarke@me.com
Website: http://www.kandagaigo.ac.jp/memorial/history/interview/05/interview_05_11.html 

Richard Clément

I was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in an almost exclusively French-speaking neighbourhood. I learned English one summer, when I was about 10, playing with English-speaking kids. Returning home, I became an informal mediator between my peers and their English-speaking counterpart, when we had contact. Great experiential learning!

My high school curriculum was heavily loaded with Latin and French literature such that, by the time I reached university, my outlook on life was anchored in a language-culture perspective. I completed my undergraduate studies in psychology at McGill University and had W.E. Lambert as an instructor and got involved in research with D. M. Taylor. My subsequent PhD at Western University with Bob Gardner allowed me to develop an expertise in second language acquisition and usage as well as in quantitative methodologies.

I am currently Professor of Psychology as well as Director and Associate Dean of the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute at the University of Ottawa. My current research interests include issues related to bilingualism, second language acquisition and identity change, and adjustment in the acculturative process, topics on which I have published in both French and English. I am a founding member of IAIR as well as member of the editorial board of the IJIR. In 2001 I was awarded the Otto Klineberg Intercultural & International Relations Prize by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. I am an elected Fellow of both the Canadian and American Psychological Associations as well as of the Royal Society of Canada. On a more personal note, I enjoy skiing, cycling, going to the opera and reading fiction.

Email: rclement@uottawa.ca
Website: http://www.olbi.uottawa.ca/rclement.php

Carlos E. Cortés

 

You might call me an accidental interculturalist.  About two decades ago, while awaiting my plenary speaker moment at a national (U.S.) education conference, I chanced into a session conducted by Milton and Janet Bennett.  I listened to them, they came to my plenary, and we became instant friends, leading to an invitation to teach at their Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication, which I have been doing since 1995, and later to join the Academy.

Interculturalism proved to be a natural fit with my long career as a historian, multicultural educator, and diversity jack-of-all-trades, particularly after I retired from the University of California, Riverside, in 1994.  Since becoming a Professor Emeritus of History I’ve been busier than ever as an independent diversity writer, lecturer, and consultant.

Most recently, I edited the four-volume Multicultural America: A Multimedia Encyclopedia (Sage, 2013) and wrote my memoir, Rose Hill: An Intermarriage before Its Time (Heyday, 2012), based on my experience of having a Mexican Catholic father and an Austro-Ukrainian Jewish mother.  Maybe my most well-known academic book is The Children Are Watching: How the Media Teach about Diversity (Teachers College Press, 2000).  That book led to my most unusual current activity – serving as Creative/Cultural Advisor for two children’s television series, “Dora the Explorer” and “Go, Diego, Go!”

This past October I did my first gig as a cruise lecturer, giving talks on comparative cultures on a two-week sailing to Turkey and Greece.  After twenty years of “retirement,” I guess I needed a new career.

Email: carlos.cortes@ucr.edu
Website: www.carlosecortes.com

Kerry Cronan

 cronan kerry

I grew up during the war years in Anglo-Celtic Australia. After the war, our family moved to a government housing area, which was again Anglo-Celtic. I was of Irish heritage. During early adolescence, I worked with my father in his market butcher shop in inner Melbourne. Here I first encountered people of another culture. Mostly these migrant people had little English and demonstrated shopping requirements in very awkward visible images. They had very different social relationships – far more direct than I had encountered previously.  I was curious but also impatient with the difficulty of relating to these people. My father’s caring manner and his indifference to any possible difficulties was a growing influence on me.  When my father became popular with these migrant groups in his business, I saw a commercial benefit in penetrating cross-cultural issues in relationships.

Later as a catholic priest I was in many migrant parishes encountering many different cultures and learnt the advantage of knowing some words and conversation in other languages.

Later I unsuccessfully applied to the East West Center in Hawaii for post graduate study in “Intimacy Cues across Cultures,” obviously formed by earlier experiences. Later experiences in clinical and consulting psychology led to a broader interest in cultural issues. However, my interest—even though not backed by rigorous research—is still in cultures bridging intimacy meanings so as to engage more effectively in many areas of global strategy, as well as gaining new skills to be retained in mono-cultures.

Email: cronan.kerry@gmail.com

Layton Seth Curl

 

 

Presently, I serve as the chair of the department of psychology at Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver). Previously I taught in the areas of cross-cultural and social psychology at Hobart and William Smith Colleges (HWS), as well as the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), where I earned my Ph.D. in psychology under the direction of Professor Dan Landis. I was Dan's last doctoral student, before his retirement and move to Hawaii. My B.A. is also in psychology from Lyon College, and my first university-level diploma is in Asian Studies from Kansai Gaidaiof Japan. My research interests cross the areas intercultural psychology, human sexuality, and social psychology. Recently I was accepted to the 2014 Harvard Graduate School of EducationManagement Development Program(MDP).

I've traveled, studied, or worked on each continent save Antarctica, and settled in Denver with my partner Cheng Tan. My hobbies range from skiing, keeping up on the latest advances in electronics and the sciences, to independent video gaming. We have two cats, Dexter and Fang.

Working with my friend and colleague, Dr. Mary Ann Watson, I've produced numerous educational video series used in college classrooms across the globe. The newest three comprise the series, Intercultural Connections in Psychology: Altruism, Dimensions of Culture, and Happiness. The series includes : The Role Of Altruism in a Meaningful Life,Five Dimensions of Culture in Ethiopia, South Africa, and the U.S, and The Pursuit of Happiness in Ethiopia and the U.S.published by Films for the Humanities and Sciences. These educational series have garnered numerous awards, with our 21-part video series, Portraits in Sexuality, used widely across the United States. Other popular titles include Becoming Me: The Gender Withinand Rocking the Cradle: Gay Parenting. Among my other academic publications is a lead journal article in International Education titled, “The Cross-Cultural Generality of Equal Opportunity Climate: A Study of College Students,” which sampled 1,334 students in three countries.

Email: lcurl@msudenver.edu
Website: www.msudenver.edu/psychology

David Dalsky

My involvement with the Academy began in 2001 when I had the pleasure of working with Dan Landis (my PhD supervisor) to organize the second IAIR conference in Oxford, Mississippi, USA. A few years later, I moved to Japan on a research fellowship from the Japanese Ministry of Education to finish data collection for my doctoral dissertation on mutual self-enhancement, a construct for which I developed an instrument to measure. This work received an honorable mention for the IAIR Outstanding Dissertation Award in 2007, and a part of it was published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. Since then, I’ve been working as an associate professor to improve the general education curriculum at Kyoto University in the Center for the Promotion of Excellence in Higher Education. My colleagues and I have collaborated on several books including an academic vocabulary database and a textbook called Writing for Academic Purposes, which received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Japan Association for College English Teachers in 2011. I’ve enjoyed living in various parts of Japan and experiencing some of the country’s most beautiful regions including the Japan Alps, the northern wilderness of Hokkaido, and, of course, ancient Kyoto. Japan is my home, but I keep my American spirit alive by listening to all genres of music from hip-hop to punk to jazz, and watching National Football League games, especially the Green Bay Packers.

Email: dalsky.davidjerome.8u@kyoto-u.ac.jp 
Website: http://kyouindb.iimc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/e/oB2hM

Justine Dandy

My research interests are in social and cross-cultural psychology. More specifically, I conduct and supervise research on: ethnic and racial identity; attitudes toward immigration, immigrants and diversity; and intercultural relations in plural societies. Recently I have led a national study examining factors that influence social cohesion in multicultural communities (with Associate Professor Rogelia Pe-Pua, UNSW).  I am currently working on acculturation attitudes and expectations in Australia, and coordinating the Australian project team for MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies, led by John Berry).  I am particularly interested in the attitudes and actions of majority and dominant groups in plural societies like Australia, and have also examined discrimination and prejudice toward ethnic and other minorities.  In my spare time, I am a music and talks presenter on Perth community radio station RTRFM.

I have been a member of the academy for several years but I haven’t yet made it to a conference – hopefully I will make it to Bergen in 2015.

Email: j.dandy@ecu.edu.au
Website: http://www.ecu.edu.au/schools/psychology-and-social-science/staff/profiles/senior-lecturers/dr-justine-dandy

Darla K. Deardorff

Darla K. Deardorff is executive director of the Association of International Education Administrators, a national professional organization based at Duke University, where she is a Research Scholar in the Program in Education.  In addition, she is visiting professor at Leeds-Metropolitan University in U.K., an adjunct professor at Monterey Institute of International Studies, and is on the faculty of the Summer Institute of Intercultural Communication in Portland, Oregon. She has also been on the faculty of Harvard University’s Future of Learning Institute as well as at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.   She receives numerous invitations from around the world to speak on her research and work on intercultural competence and international education assessment and is a noted expert on these topics.  She has been a commencement speaker as well the keynote speaker for numerous conferences around the world including a UN-related World Forum in Azerbaijan.

Dr. Deardorff has published widely on topics in international education, global leadership and intercultural learning/assessment and is editor of The SAGE Handbook of Intercultural Competence (Sage, 2009) as well as co-editor of The SAGE Handbook of International Higher Education (Sage, 2012) with Hans de Wit, John Heyl and Tony Adams, and co-editor of Building Cultural Competence: Innovative Activities and Models (Stylus, 2012) with Kate Berardo.  She is founder of ICC Global, a global network of researchers on intercultural competence. Her research interests include intercultural competence development/assessment and internationalization. Other interests include travel and photography.  

Email: d.deardorff@duke.edu
Website: http://sites.duke.edu/darladeardorff/

Radosveta Dimitrova

 

I obtained my PhD in developmental psychology at Trieste University, Italy with a dissertation on immigrant families that was awarded the Best Doctoral Thesis by the Italian Psychological Association in 2009. Currently, I am completing my 2nd PhD in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands with a project on ethnic minority youth in post-communist Europe that received the 2012 Student and Early Career Council (SECC) Dissertation Award of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). I have been a visiting researcher at the Brent Centre for Young People London (UK) and Brown University (USA). My research interests are in the areas of cross-cultural and developmental psychology, migration, and identity of ethnic minority groups (Roma). I have also edited a book: Dimitrova, R., & Bender, M., & van de Vijver, F. (2013). Global perspectives on well-being in immigrant families. NY: Springer.

I am actively involved in international professional service for young scholars as the president of the Early Researchers Union (ERU) at the European Association of Developmental Psychology (EADP) and representative of SECC and the Ethnic & Racial Issues Committee at SRCD, the Society for Research on Adolescence’s (SRA) Study Group Committee, the Society for the Study of Human Development (SSHD) Emerging Scholars Committee and the Advisory Committee of the Global Human Development Intervention Research Network.

I have been an IAIR member since 2010 and have published a paper in its journal, IJIR: Dimitrova, R., Chasiotis, A., Bender,M., & van de Vijver, F. J. R. (2013). Ethnic identity and acculturation of Turkish-Bulgarian adolescents. IJIR, 37, 1-10.

E-mail: R.Dimitrova@uvt.nl, rdimitrova@tiscali.it
Website: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/webwijs/show/?uid=r.dimitrova

Ray T. Donahue

I am a fellow of IAIR and a professor of intercultural communication at Nagoya Gakuin University in Japan, teaching in graduate programs of international studies and of English linguistics and elsewhere.

My career began as an interracial counselor and trainer in the U.S., by which I gained skill at discourse analysis and intercultural relations. Such was applied in my book Japanese Culture and Communication: Critical Cultural Analysis (University Press of America), receiving an outstanding research award by the International/Intercultural Division of the National Communication Association and since identified in the Journal of Multicultural Discourse as a core book for the study of East Asia. My other major books include Diplomatic Discourse: International Conflict at the United Nations, with Michael H. Prosser, (Ablex) and Exploring Japaneseness (ed.) (Ablex). Among my research contributions are these “firsts” related to cultural imaging and perception:

1) First to make comparative study of the historic U.S. government Job films (1945/46)—orientation training for the post-war occupation of Germany and of Japan—finding relative difference in racial imaging of “other” and relation with the “fundamental error of attribution.”

2) First, or among the first, to trace cultural transmission of racialized stereotyping across generations: from post-war media (1945/1946) to a children’s cartoon series (1985) and to major television network news broadcasting (1995) in the U.S.

3) First to comprehensively study the cornerstone of the field of contrastive rhetoric— certain cross-linguistic studies of Japanese and English rhetoric—revealing the structuralist prescriptive (as opposed to functionalist descriptive) underpinnings while identifying key principles of contrastive discourse analysis.

Presently I am studying the links between culture and communication in international exchanges. In my free time, I like playing basketball, viewing impressionistic and abstract art works, and watching good movies.

Email:RayDonahue@eastwestcommunity.org

Grant Douglas

I am a long-term British expat to France. I moved to France after finishing my first degree at the University of Leeds and began teaching in Paris. I then moved to Lille where I taught at the University Charles de Gaulle and did a post-graduate degree in Anglo-Saxon Literature and Civilization. I then began working in study abroad which focused my attention on the questions of the intercultural adaptation of outgoing and incoming students and staff in higher education institutions.

I have organized, implemented and evaluated many international programs, from short summer schools to master’s courses, mainly at Lille Catholic University. In 2010 I began a PhD at the University of Canterbury Christ Church, England to look at the impact of study abroad on the emerging cultural and professional identities of French students.

I am interested in better understanding the impact of study abroad and in finding ways to maximize and generalize its potential benefits and also in helping students better communicate, work and relate to each other, especially when time is of the essence.

I am a member of SIETAR-France and have been general-secretary for a number of years. My involvement with the Academy is more recent (2010) and so far I have not attended any conferences. I hope to put this right at the next conference in Bergen 2015.

In my spare time I like to listen to music from around the world, to watch soccer and to share these passions with my two sons.

Email:grant.douglas@univ-catholille.fr

Dina Dunayeva (Kolodzie)

Born and raised in Ukraine, I was educated and worked in Ukraine, Russia, Europe, and the USA. My career started at the Moscow Academy of Management (Russia) in the 1980s. My doctorate research on the methodology of transition from command to market economy thinking turned into a life-long theoretical and practical work devoted to the development of the effective mechanisms of communication and cooperation for people with former “ socialist” and capitalist” backgrounds.

Some practical results included The Comparative Thesaurus of Key Command and Market Economy Terms; The Professional English for Managers; Economika 1989; curricula and materials for my business language school, Econika; as well as articles and numerous presentations at international forums in Russia, Europe, and the USA.

Since the 1990s I have lived in the USA developing and delivering training programs and consulting projects for numerous American, Russian and Russian/American teams, businesses and organizations based on my Model of Cross-Cultural Communication.

The key components of the model, i.e., contextual, mentality, and values analyses, were described in my presentation at the IAIR 2nd Biennial Conference in 2001*.  I also provided some input from a practitioner view to some IAIR magazine publications.

The practical implementation of my model contributed to the development of the common professional language and shared business culture in many Russian/American projects, especially in the Russian Far East.

Recently, I have been processing theoretical and practical findings (“lessons learned”) to update and move my training and consulting projects to a new level.  The current Ukrainian-Russian-American crisis calls for more effective mechanisms for understanding, communication, and cooperation.

*Presentation entitled, “Russian/American cross-cultural programs as a way of increasing the effectiveness of business cooperation”

Email: dinad@earthlink.net

Richard Evanoff

 

I am originally from the United States, where I studied philosophy at Milligan College in Tennessee as an undergrad and the University of Chicago as a graduate student. While at Milligan I met my future wife, Echo, who was an exchange student from Japan. After getting married and putting each other through graduate school, we came to Japan in 1981. I joined the faculty of the School of International Politics, Economics, and Communication at Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo in 1989. Later I had the opportunity to attend various workshops conducted by Milton Bennett and Janet Bennett, which first stimulated my interest in trying to find ways to bring a philosophical perspective to the field of intercultural relations, particularly with regard to ethics. In 2002 I was able to finish a PhD at Lancaster University in the UK, with an emphasis on environmental and development ethics. Currently I teach courses in intercultural communication and international ethics (including global and intercultural ethics). My book, Bioregionalism and Global Ethics, published by Routledge in 2011, argues that decisions about how cultures interact with their natural environments and pursue their development goals are better made at the local (bioregional) level, rather than by global institutions. Despite my “localist” leanings, I have been involved with the United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations and the UNESCO Workshop on Ethical Approaches to Climate Change Policies. I am also active with various environmental groups, and volunteer as a hike leader for the NGO, Friends of the Earth-Japan.

E-mail:  evanoff@sipeb.aoyama.ac.jp
Website: http://raweb1.jm.aoyama.ac.jp/aguhp/KgApp?kojinId=aaacaj

Fang Liu

I am an associate professor in Marketing at the Business School of the University of Western Australia (UWA).   I have just joined IAIR and my first IAIR conference was the Reno conference. My teaching, research, and consulting areas centre on traditional and non-traditional media advertising, promotion, public relations, branding, cross-cultural consumer behaviour, and international strategies. I have dozens of publications, including refereed articles and book chapters, in these research areas. I have taught a variety of marketing subjects, such as advertising and promotion, global marketing strategies, and marketing planning, in Australia, China, and Singapore. One of my teaching highlights happened in 2008 when my student team won the inaugural Google Online Marketing Challenge (GOMC), which involved more than 8,500 students in 47 countries with 1,650 teams competing. Prior to my academic career, I had extensive experience in international trade and marketing, and had worked for some of the largest international trade companies in China. I love sports and my favourite sports are swimming and basketball. I also enjoy music and interior design.

Email: fang.liu@uwa.edu.au
Website: http://www.uwa.edu.au/people/fang.liu

Bagher Fardanesh

Coming to the United States as a high school student, the only word I knew was “good morning,” which I thought meant hello, and I used it all the time. By saying this term in the evenings, I was often perceived as being humorous, and with a smile, others would respond by saying, “Good morning to you…” As I remember, this was my first encounter with misunderstanding in a culturally diverse setting which drove my interest in the field of miscommunication relevant to multicultural organizations.

Regarding my hobbies, by living in Switzerland and in Colorado for several years, I became attracted to winter sports, particularly downhill skiing. I very much enjoy socializing with my friends and family.

In 2008 I had the pleasure of meeting one of your members, Dr. Gary Weaver, who heads the Intercultural Management Institute (IMI) at the American University. After giving various presentations at IMI, Gary recommended that I join the International Academy for Intercultural Research. I am excited and delighted to be a member of this prestigious academy.

Email: bf@piagetconsulting.com

Bernardo M. Ferdman

I ampassionate about helping to create an inclusive world in which more of us can be fully ourselves. I first became interested in intercultural relations as a child, after emigrating from Argentina to the U.S. (and later Puerto Rico). I am a Charter Fellow of IAIR and attended its first conference in 1998. As a professor of organizational psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, and a consultant for about thirty years, I’ve worked with organizations in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America to foster inclusion and to build multicultural competencies on the part of individuals, teams, and the whole organization, as well as to inspire individuals to find their own voice and make their full contribution. I consult, write, speak, teach, and conduct research on diversity and inclusion, multicultural and inclusive leadership, Latino/Latina identity, and bringing one’s whole self to work. My new edited book, Diversity at Work: The Practice of Inclusion(part of SIOP’s Professional Practice Series), provides a state-of-the-art, research-based understanding of inclusion and how to systematically create it, foster it, and navigate its challenges. I am a member of the Diversity Collegium and a Fellow of APA (including four of its divisions), and served as President of the Interamerican Society of Psychology and Chair of the Academy of Management's Gender and Diversity in Organizations Division and Diversity and Inclusion Theme Committee. In 1991, I received SPSSI’s Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize. I earned my Ph.D. in Psychology at Yale University and my A.B. at Princeton University.

E-mail: bferdman@alliant.edu
Websites: http://ferdmanconsulting.com; http://bernardoferdman.org; http://www.linkedin.com/in/ferdman

Edward L. Fink

Edward L. Fink is professor of communication at the University of Maryland, where he is Distinguished Scholar-Teacher and affiliate professor of Sociology, Psychology, and the PhD Program in Second Language Acquisition. He previously taught at Michigan State University and the University of Notre Dame. His research involves creating and testing models of culture, cognition, and communication and studying the methodological and statistical issues involved in such research.

He has served as chair of Maryland’s Department of Communication (1997-2007) and as acting associate dean for Graduate Studies and Research. In 1998 he was awarded a Lady Davis Visiting Professorship to Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 2014 he was named a Fellow of the International Communication Association. He has been editor of Human Communication Research and associate editor of the Journal of Communication.

His work has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Journal of Communication, Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Communication Research, and Social Psychology Quarterly. His intercultural work includes the co-authored book The Measurement of Communication Processes (1980) and cross-cultural research on obligations (Cai, Fink, & Xie, 2012), conflict styles (Cai & Fink, 2002), and networks (Cai & Fink, 2011).

As you can surmise, much of his intercultural work has been in collaboration with his wife, Deborah A. Cai, who is an IAIR Fellow. In addition to researching together, they like to eat good food, drink good wine, read, watch movies, and walk their dog Argos.

Email: elf@umd.edu
Website: http://www.comm.umd.edu/people/faculty/fink

Ronald Fischer

My name is Ronald Fischer and I am a reader at Victoria University of Wellington and a fellow of the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research. Growing up behind the Iron Curtain in former East Germany made me deeply curious about the wider world beyond, and this curiosity about other people, their cultures and social conditions has driven a lot of my research. Since then, I have been fortunate to work with individuals and communities in remote corners of the world. My work today focuses on an integration of social sciences with biological and evolutionary approaches to provide a more interdisciplinary and holistic perspective on human behaviour in social context and help with the development of theory-driven interventions to address social and human problems. I have been awarded a Marie Curie-Cofund Fellowship at the Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies in Denmark to pursue this vision focusing on collective rituals. Colleen Ward introduced me to IAIR, and I enjoyed the friendly atmosphere during my first Intercultural Academy Conference in Taiwan in 2004. I have been involved with the IAIR community since then, reviewing for the journal and being part of the selection committee for the Dan and Rae Landis Doctoral Thesis Award commission in some years. My work on organizational justice and values was honoured in 2007 with an Early Career Award from IAIR at the conference in Groningen. My work continues to attract attention and more recently, I was included in the top ten list for most cited cross-cultural psychologists. I am an associate editor for the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and also serve on a number of editorial boards of psychology and management journals. Outside work, I practice and teach Capoeira (an Afro-Brazilian martial-arts) and love photography. Check out my blog at culturemindspace.blogspot.com.

Email: ronald.fischer@vuw.ac.nz

Dieter Flader

 

As a student at the Univ. of Hamburg, I had three “enlightening” academic experiences: the pragmatic turn in linguistics; a critical theory of society; and psychoanalysis/psychology as research methods within a specific theoretical model. I needed several years to recognize that these separate disciplines in fact belong together, that they are elements of a superior discipline: communication analysis.

I did my PhD in linguistics (Hamburg), and then I took a position of assistant professor at the Univ. of Essen in the dept. of communication and language, from 1974-1984, where I did my habilitation with the “venia legendi” on linguistics and communication research. I was the head of the research project on speech conditions of psychoanalytic therapy, founded by the DFG. In this time I participated in a psychoanalytic training myself. Then I transferred to the Frei Univ. of Berlin, dept. of linguistics and German language. As a “private docent” I felt free to travel and was curious to meet people from other cultures. Apart from several visiting professorships inside Germany, I was lecturing as a guest docent in countries abroad: at Vanderbilt Univ. (Nashville); Cukurova Univ. (Adana); Katholieke Hogeschool (Tilburg); Charles Univ. (Prague); State Univ.of Aserbaidschan (Baku).

After having received the title of “Adjunct Professor” (a title of honor called “extraordinary professor”) at the Freie Univ., from 1996-2001 I was a visiting professor at the Graduate School for Social Research at the Polish Academy of Science in Warsaw and from 2001-2007 a visiting professor at the Institute of Applied Linguistics at Warsaw Univ. In this time, with the help of my students, I did a research project on the typical intercultural communication problems of Western managers in Warsaw. These problems occurred in their contacts with Polish staff, empirically founded on a lot of interviews which I had conducted in Warsaw. To analyze the empirical data I used the method of participative action analysis which was developed from my experiences in these interviews. The English translation of the book Culture Shock, which documents this research work in Warsaw, is in preparation (co-author is Sigrun Comati). A smaller part of this book is available as an article in ISPSW no. 191 (2012).

Then a team of lawyers specializing in international arbitration in the energy sector asked me to help them to improve the integrity and efficiency of international arbitration whose relevance has increased, together with the necessary awareness of intercultural differences and their impact on the arbitration process. This research work is still in progress.  The first publication (co-authored with arbitrator Sophie Nappert) is titled “Psychological Factors in the Arbitral Process” and appears in The Art of Advocacy in International Arbitration, edited by Bishop/Kehoe, 2010, pp. 121-148.  Several interviews with arbitrators that I have conducted in London, Vienna and Geneva (2011) are now being analyzed according to our qualitative approach of research.

Sticking to my research interest in further developing the fundamental theory of psychoanalysis with the help of modern communication analysis (Flader et al. 1982; Flader 1995), I am currently finishing my research work on a modern version of a psychoanalytic critique of culture. The title of this book is The Loss of the Father and the Dominance of the Mother: The Signature of the Unconscious in Social Actions.

I have been a member of the International Academy for Intercultural Research since 2008.

Email:multitex@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Gary Fontaine

I am an Emeritus Professor in the School of Communications at the University of Hawaii and a member of IAIR beginning with the 1997 founding meeting in Portland.  My primary professional interests center on persons, teams and organizations as they encounter the adjustment, performance and motivation challenges of "strange lands"-- novel and rapidly changing ecologies characterized by new people, places, cultures and technologies. I am particularly interested in the experiences these challenges produce, the strategies developed to deal with them, and the communication and other skills required to implement the strategies effectively.  Over the years I have applied this focus to global assignments; our diverse, rapidly changing workplaces at home; geographically dispersed teams, distance learning, knowledge creation and transfer, criminal justice; service delivery; and close relationships.  Most recently my emphases have been on coaching teams, managers and leaders to deal with intercultural and global diversity effectively and on self-organization and swarm optimization models of globalization in multinational enterprises.

Interwoven with these professional interests, my life also involves family, travel to “strange lands” everywhere and exploring the people and places there, as well as hiking, kayaking, skin diving, and other life experiences.  I spend much of my time in my homes on the island of Boracay in the Philippines and Mercer Island near Seattle in the US.  For more about both my professional and personal interests—including links to my resume, publications, courses and training seminars—please visit my website or contact me.

Email: garymfontaine@gmail.com
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/gfstrangelands/Home

Sandra Fowler

As a young professional working for the National Bureau of Standards, I was assigned to a project to assess the costs and benefits of the U.S. Peace Corps’ staging processes. It was the first time I dealt with culture’s direct impact on the ability to do work. A fascination with culture has remained and led to a Master’s Degree in organizational psychology with an emphasis on intercultural relations.

After eight years of research at the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center in San Diego, on selection and training of uniformed navy personnel, where part of my duties was developing behaviorally anchored rating scales for BaFa BaFa, I moved to Washington, DC to head the Overseas Duty Support Program. I expanded the program in both scope and content and embedded it within the navy organizational structure.

Leaving that position in 1989, I maintained an active consulting and training schedule working with a variety of U.S. and global companies as well as government agencies. I have been very engaged with SIETAR International serving as president from 1986 to 1988, and with SIETAR USA serving as the founding secretary and continuing on the Board in several capacities. I agreed at the initial IAIR conference in Fullerton to be on the Membership Committee (and have been there ever since.) It was wonderful catching up with old friends at the Reno conference in 2013. Mostly retired at this point, but still “professionally active” I write and train a bit and serve as the Art Co-Editor for the American Psychologist.

Email: sfowler@apa.org

Wolfgang Frindte

I am a professor of communication psychology at the Department of Communication, Friedrich-Schiller-University in Jena, Germany and the academic director of the master program “Human Communication” at Dresden International University.  My research focuses on attitudes and communication in intercultural and intergroup-specific contexts (prejudice, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, group specific violence and intergroup threats, macro-social stress and terrorism). I also teach in these research areas. I have a publication record of 16 academic books and 140 scholarly articles and book-chapters and I have received about 20 major research grants. Since 2001 I have been an IAIR fellow.

Email: wolfgang.frindte@uni-jena.de

Fabian Froese

Currently, I am a professor and chair of Human Resource Management and Asian Business at the Georg-August-University Goettingen in Germany. I earned a Diplom-Kaufmann (master in business) from the University of Mannheim, Germany, a doctorate in international management from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, and another doctorate in sociology from Waseda University, Japan. Born and raised in/near Cologne, Germany, I spent more than 10 years in Asia before returning to my home country. During my time in Asia I worked as an expatriate in Singapore and Shanghai, research fellow in Tokyo, and professor in Seoul. My international experience and personal background (father German, mother Korean) evoked a natural feeling to study cross-cultural management. My research focuses on expatriates, diversity management and international human resource management with a regional focus on China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Germany.

Due to my experience and expertise, I am involved in several roles bridging Germany/Europe with Asia. For instance, I am a board member of the Centre of Modern East Asian Studies at the University of Goettingen, the Association of Japanese Business Studies, and Euro-Asia Studies Management Association. 

I joined IAIR when the conference was held in Hawaii in 2009. It was a great conference in a great venue. The next conference will take place in Bergen, not that far from Goettingen, and I hope to meet you there. If you are interested in a research stay in Germany please feel free to contact me. Several of my doctoral students come from abroad, and every year, I host several foreign researchers. My hobbies are tennis and soccer.

Email:fabian.froese@gmail.com

Cindy Gallois

I am currently an Emeritus Professor in psychology and communication at The University of Queensland, where I have worked since 1979.  My interest in intercultural relations and communication began when I lived in France and Belgium as a young bilingual, and realised that I changed dramatically when I switched languages.  That trigger prompted my PhD and many years of research on the impact of culture and identity on communication, which has concentrated on an exploration of Communication Accommodation Theory.  My research began in the intercultural area, but it became clear that the same processes also apply to other role and group changes.  Thus, I began to study identity and culture in organisational communication.  I had always had a strong interest in health, and at present almost all my research focuses on health communication, including interactions between health providers and patients, interprofessional communication in health, and most recently communication about the end of life and health risk communication in a second language.  The intercultural and intergroup lens has worked amazingly well.  I am a Charter Fellow of IAIR, and also a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, International Communication Association, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and International Association of Language and Social Psychology.  I have had management roles at UQ over the past 15 years, as well as doing research and supervising PhD students and postdoctoral fellows.  In my (increasing) spare time, I enjoy small-group choral singing, especially early music.

Email: c.gallois@uq.edu.au
Website: http://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=13#show_Research

Manuel García-Ramírez

I am a community psychologist delving into cross-cultural psychology. My interests are inquiring into what links communities and cultures together, thereby helping to create a closer understanding of our multicultural societies.

For more than 15 years I have been teaching and researching community psychology at the Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). My focus has been on the development of Community-Based Participatory Research initiatives aimed at ensuring equitable conditions toward immigrants in Europe. I have focused on African immigrants in Andalusia— which is one of the most important entrances to Europe for people from Africa. I created and am currently leading CESPYD, (Coalition for the Study of Health, Power and Diversity, www.cespyd.es) which is a European network of community researchers with the main hub located at the Universidad de Sevilla. CESPYD is composed of an international and multidisciplinary team of scholars who hold solid relations with the main stakeholders involved in the wellbeing of displaced vulnerable citizens such as immigrants.

The findings of my research have encouraged new ways of thinking and taking action among the international scientific community in some of the main topics in the psychology of migration. Taking an ecological and liberating approach, I have redefined acculturative integration as an empowering and multilevel process by which newcomers acquire well-being and legitimacy in their new society. This perspective has been published in the American Journal of Community Psychology (García-Ramirez et al., 2011). Its application to immigrant organizations, understood as empowering community liaisons, was published in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations (Paloma, García-Ramirez & Mata, 2010). A key determinant in immigrants’ well-being is their ability to use public services. My work has contributed to developing an ecological and community perspective of the construct of cultural competence, published in the F.T.L. Leong (Ed.), APA Handbook of Multicultural Psychology.

My wife, Maria Jesus, is a professor in the Department of Nursing at the Universidad de Sevilla. We met at the university when we were both students and we have two children—Manuel who is 38 and a physicist researcher at the Max Planck Institute in Munich (Germany), and Paloma who is 21 and a chemistry undergraduate student. During my free time I like getting involved by spending and enjoying my time, discovering new cooking recipes that mix Mediterranean foods with the rest of diverse cuisine from around the word. Also, I am a supporter of the Sevillian football team “Real Betis Balompié”, one of the most famous football clubs of the world—although often it brings me more sadness than joy.

E-mail: magarcia@us.es
Website: www.cespyd.es and http://investigacion.us.es/sisius/sis_showpub.php?idpers=1228

Charles Garvin

Charles Garvin, PhD is professor emeritus of social work at the University of Michigan. He received his master's (1951) and doctoral (1968) degrees from the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. He has been a faculty member at the University of Michigan School of Social Work since 1965. He is the author or coauthor of such texts as Social Work in Contemporary Society, Contemporary Group Work, Interpersonal Practice in Social Work, Generalist Practice in Social Work, Primer of Research in Group Work (in press)andHandbook of Social Work and Social Justice (in press).His interest in the association began with his involvement in a 10 year project in high schools to develop and test a model for training high school students to become leaders in resolving intergroup conflicts in group and institutional settings.

He enjoys reading, hiking, attending concerts of all types of music, attending a men's group that has lasted almost 30 years, and participation in social action activities for revitalizing a democratic and multi-cultural society. 

 

Email: charlesg@umich.edu

Howard Giles

 

giles howard

I am Howie Giles, past head of psychology—appointed chair of social psychology after Henri Tajfel—at the University of Bristol, England, and have been professor of communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara (with affiliations with linguistics and psychology) since 1989.  I am a charter fellow of the Academy and have conducted cross-cultural research across most continents. I am an “intergroup communication” researcher (e.g., editor of the 2012 Handbook of Intergroup Communication and co-editor of the upcoming Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Intergroup Communication) who has studied an array of intercultural settings, including between-gender, interability, interethnic, intergenerational, police-community, and gay-straight relations. Within these, for example, I have explored language attitudes, ethnic identity, tourism, acculturation, and successful aging. An integrative framework across these arenas has been communication accommodation theory, me being its architect in the early 1970s. I have been concerned to inject the salience of “culture” into intergroup theory of research and was editor of the “Intergroup and Intercultural” section of the International Encyclopedia of Communication (2008-). Elected past president of the International Communication Association and the International Association for Language and Social Psychology, I am founding/current editor of the Journal of Language and Social Psychology (1981-) and the Journal of Asian Pacific Communication (1990-), as well as elected editor of Human Communication Research (1995-98). Until recently, my “hobby” was being a reserve detective lieutenant in the Santa Barbara Police Department for 15 years, and now I spend leisure time at our local wineries, on music, and with my family.

Email:  HowieGiles@cox.net
Website: http://www.comm.ucsb.edu/people/howard-giles

 

Tehmina Gladman

I am currently working as a Professional Practice Fellow in eLearning for the University of Otago, Wellington Medical School. Although my career has taken a number of twists and turns since receiving my Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Mississippi in 2002, I have always been interested in how and why individuals communicate across linguistic and cultural barriers.

From my doctoral research in intercultural communications, I moved to a lectureship in Japan and focussed my research on student motivation in second language acquisition. This led me to an interest in the use of eLearning and asynchronous teaching for non-native English speakers. It was at this time that I moved with my family to New Zealand and began working as an instructional designer and eLearning trainer. This new path has given me the opportunity to work with Massey University, the New Zealand Defence Force and now the University of Otago. It has also reminded me that cultural differences are not just national, but organisational as well.

I have been a member of IAIR since receiving my doctorate in 2002 and have presented at three conferences as both a student and member starting with the 1999 conference at Kent State University, my first academic conference as a presenter.  My research was also presented at the 2004 Taiwan Normal University conference and at the 2005 Kent State University conference.

Email: tehmina.gladman@otago.ac.nz
Website: http://www.tehminagladman.com

Sharon Glazer

A confluence of various life events has led me to my path and interests in cross-cultural organizational psychology. First, as a third culture kid (TCK), born and raised in the USA to immigrant parents who were born in Eastern Europe during and right after the Holocaust and lived their formidable years in Israel, I came to embrace cultural similarities and differences at a very early age. My summers were enjoyed in Israel, walking to the beach on my own and going out with friends until well-past midnight already at the age of 12. In comparison to my life in Baltimore, in Israel I felt a sense of autonomy and responsibility. In the USA my parents were afraid for my safety; in Israel they felt secure that a community (despite being in a major coastal city) would look out for me. I regularly wondered about these differences. I was no less a responsible person. Culture and environment clearly played a role in their different parenting practices.

Second, unlike many U.S. children, I grew up with 4 languages, and I noticed how family and friends’ behaviors changed depending on the language spoken. It was a strange observation I made already at the age of 8 or 9. Third, from the time I was 3 years old, our house was like an “absorption center.” My parents would often host visitors, even strangers who had no place to go, for weeks. By the time I was in high school, the international bug was engrained and I became active in the AFS program, hosting students for weeks and weekends at a time. I also participated in a 3-week exchange to Italy. Although I could not attend any of the Italian language classes prior to our departure, I returned speaking Italian better than any of my other 30+ classmates.

By the time I went to college I was quite confident that I wanted to be an international political science major. Well, that was until I tried to do some work with politicians and quickly realized that politics is too dirty, and I don’t like deception. I wanted to engage in work that would help people without compromising my integrity. So, I pursued psychology and found my way to industrial and organizational psychology in graduate school. What better way to make a difference in people’s lives than in the part that takes up more than half their waking hours and often spills over to their nonwork waking hours?

During my studies, I noticed how much of a cross-cultural understanding of work behaviors was missing from the business world. This awareness, augmented with my experiences abroad, lead me to realize that the perception and manifestation of job stress differed across cultures—even when people had similar occupations. How could this be? What drove those differences? These questions lead me to my main research program on occupational stress across cultures, studying potential moderators, including individual differences, social support, personal values, and temporal perspective, of the relationship between work stressors and both organizational and personal strains (e.g., turnover, organizational commitment, anxiety, and well-being). In fact, at my first IAIR meeting, held at Kent State University in 1998, I presented a paper on organizational commitment and values across cultures. In 2000, I was awarded an Honorable Mention from IAIR for my dissertation on job stress across cultures. I also serve as a consulting editor for the IJIR.

When I am not engaging in research, I’m engaging in research. I love to travel and interact with people from different cultural backgrounds. And, so, in a sense it is still research. I also love dancing, cooking, and entertaining friends (from around the globe, of course). Most of all, I love to observe my children at play and to realize how much of psychology truly requires an eye for individual differences and cultural context.

Email: sglazer@ubalt.edu
Website: http://www.ubalt.edu/cas/faculty/alphabetical-directory/sharon.glazer.cfm

Susan Goldstein

goldstein susan

I am a professor of psychology at the University of Redlands, where I teach cross-cultural psychology as well as study abroad pre-departure and re-entry courses. I have served on the IJIR editorial board since 1990 and have been a member of IAIR since 2001. I received my PhD from the University of Hawaii while a grantee of the East-West Center, where I worked as a graduate assistant on Dan Landis and Richard Brislin’s Handbook of Intercultural Training. My excitement about cross-cultural psychology was first sparked much earlier, however, when Peggy Pusch kindly took me on as an undergraduate summer intern at Syracuse University’s International Student Center. 

My current research focuses on predictors and outcomes of participation in study abroad, with an emphasis on factors that influence the development of intercultural competence and global citizenship. I have long been interested in the teaching of cross-cultural psychology and have written, presented, and consulted on strategies for integrating cross-cultural issues and other forms of diversity into the psychology curriculum. I am also a strong advocate of conceptually and pedagogically addressing social issues in the classroom and, with support from the APS Fund for the Teaching and Public Understanding of Psychological Science, have developed web resources to assist teachers of psychology in doing so (see: http://makingconnections.redlands.edu).

When time allows, my husband and I take every opportunity to travel, particularly when it can include a visit to our daughters in the Pacific Northwest.

Email: susan_goldstein@redlands.edu
Website: http://www.redlands.edu/academics/college-of-arts-sciences/undergraduate-studies/psychology/2201.aspx#.VJ2WhF4AKA

Aurora Gómez Jiménez

My name is Aurora Gómez from Costa Rica. I love traveling, learning languages, and meeting people from different cultures. When I was a university student I did several exchange programs in the United States and Canada. After I graduated in English teaching as a Second language (TESOL), I decided to start a second master’s degree in international relations and diplomacy with emphasis in international cooperation, which I concluded a couple of years ago. Then I moved to Switzerland and did several internships in United Nation agencies: United Nations Development program (UNDP), United Nations Volunteering Program (UNV), and the International Labor Organization (ILO). I have also participated as a volunteer with street children in India, leatherback turtles in Costa Rica, and informal workers in El Salvador. Currently, I am a professor at National University (UNA) in the faculty of philosophy and literature in Costa Rica.

I am currently working on research projects about developing intercultural competence. I am very pleased to be part of this organization, and I expect to participate in an interactive and enriching community to exchange ideas and experiences. I believe it is essential to develop intercultural competence among individuals to be better prepared while interacting with people from different backgrounds. This intercultural competence will definitely allow cultures to come together and develop an environment of friendship, respect, peace, and understanding.

 

Email: aurogom675@hotmail.com

Gonzalo Martin Gorosito

My name is Gonzalo Martin Gorosito and I live in Buenos Aires, Argentina where I am a member of the Argentine Society of Family Therapy and the Systemic Association of Buenos Aires. I am a doctoral student at Universidad del Salvador (www.usal.edu.ar), and my research is about intercultural couples living in Argentina; more precisely, I study the effects of cultural differences on marital satisfaction and dyadic adjustment in couples where one member is Argentine and the other is immigrant. Due to the increasing number of intercultural couples that are being formed in my country, and the fact that some of them begin with couple or family therapy for different reasons, my research´s aim is to provide empirical evidence about the dynamics of intercultural couples by examining how they manage to adapt to the cultural differences and what strategies they employ to deal with conflicts and problems that could be created as a result of those differences. After living in the United States for more than 7 years where I obtained my degree in psychology at California Southern University, and after visiting many countries due to my work as a captain for a major airline, I became very interested in researching about intercultural relations with a special focus on families and couples. As a hobby I race rally cars and enjoy playing music with my keyboards.

Email: gorositogonzalo@gmail.com

Paul Gorski

 

I am an associate professor in New Century College and a Research Fellow in the Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, George Mason University. My work and passion is social justice activism. My areas of scholarly focus include anti-poverty activism and education, economic justice, racial justice, environmental justice, and animal rights. In the intercultural research world I am most concerned about how intercultural work has become an industry that often recreates existing inequities and power relationships under the guise of “intercultural practice.” I helped design New Century College's Social Justice and Human Rights Concentration and Minor and am a busy consultant and speaker, working with community and educational organizations around the world—such as in Colombia, Australia, India, and Mexico—on equity and social justice concerns. I founded EdChange (http://www.EdChange.org), a coalition of educators and activists who develop free social justice resources for educators and activists. I currently am serving my second term on the board of directors of the International Association for Intercultural Education and have been an IAIR fellow for seven years. My most recent books include Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity GapThe Poverty and Education Reader: A Call for Equity in Many Voices (with Julie Landsman), Case Studies on Diversity and Social Justice Education (with Seema Pothini), The Big Lies of School Reform (with Kristien Zenkov), and Cultivating Social Justice Teachers (with Kristien Zenkov, Nana Osei-Kofi, and Jeff Sapp). I enjoy hiking, playing basketball, traveling, and cooking. I live in Washington, DC, USA, with my cats, Unity and Buster.

Email: gorski@edchange.org
Websites: http://paulgorski.efoliomn.com/and http://www.edchange.org

Daniela Gröeschke

I received my diploma (MA degree) in psychology from the University of Chemnitz, and my PhD degree in management from the University of Bochum, both in Germany. Currently, I am an assistant professor of Intercultural Human Resources and Organizational Development at the University of Jena, Germany. Multidisciplinary perspectives influence both my teaching and research. My teaching encompasses cross-cultural psychology, organizational culture, intercultural communication, and the area of cross-cultural teamwork. My research interests include the analysis and the development of cross-cultural competence at individual, group, and organizational levels. I have also engaged with strategies in diversity management, collaboration mechanisms in cross-cultural teams, and shared leadership processes.

I attended the biennial conference of the Academy in Singapore and have been a member since 2011. I feel very much honored to be a member of the Academy as the International Journal of Intercultural Relations was an undoubted eye opener for me during my studies.

Besides my research and teaching, I enjoy traveling around the world but also commuting between Jena and Berlin, my home town. Before I started my academic career, I undertook an apprenticeship as an air traffic management assistant because airports are my third favorite place to be. I also enjoy walks in nature, photography, and exercising.

Email: daniela.groeschke@uni-jena.de
Website: www.iwk-jena.de

Cornelius N. Grove

I’m an unusual member.  Although I’ve had no university affiliation for decades, I’m proudly a Charter Member.  Here’s my story:  During the early ‘70s, my wife and I sojourned for two years in Europe and Africa, including living a year in Portugal.  Back in the States, I entered Teachers College for an M.A. in counseling…and discovered the intercultural field.  I changed my major the next day.  My Ed.D. dissertation explored the cultural adaptation of immigrant Portuguese students to American education.

For several years as an adjunct, I taught a course on classroom cultures at Teachers College and New School University.  My day job throughout the ‘80s was director of research for AFS Intercultural Programs.  I collaborated with Ingemar Torbiörn on an IJIR article, which won two awards.  During 1986, I took a leave from AFS to teach at a Beijing university; with its vice chancellor, I co-authored Encountering the Chinese (1991).

In 1990 I founded the global consultancy Grovewell LLC, soon partnering with anthropologist Willa Hallowell.  While guiding our firm’s growth, we wrote intercultural articles for business periodicals and created the cross-cultural business simulation, Randömia Balloon Factory (2001).  A consulting request from Pfizer concerned its trainers’ challenges with overseas trainees; this revived my interest in classroom cultures.  I developed a robust framework for understanding instructional styles across cultures, the topic of my next book.

In June 2013, Rowman & Littlefield published The Aptitude Myth, my book on the history of an idea.  Currently I’m drafting my 100th professional publication, “Cognitive Styles Across Cultures,” one of ten entries I’m preparing for the Encyclopedia of Intercultural Competence.  My wife and I have three sons, all business leaders; our fourth grandchild was just born in Taipei.   Grovewell LLC is beginning its 25th year (largest client: J&J).  Although I’m 72, retirement holds no fascination.

E-mail: cornelius@grovewell.com
Websites: www.grovewell.comand www.theaptitudemyth.info

Serge Guimond

guimond serge 

Bonjour ! I am a professor of social psychology at the Université Blaise Pascal in Clermont-Ferrand, France and Head of LAPSCO, a CNRS research laboratory. In 2011, I became a fellow of IAIR, and I am extremely proud of that. The goals of IAIR of promoting tolerance and intercultural understanding are extremely important to me.

Born in Montreal, Canada, I studied at McGill University, working with Donald Taylor at a time when research on multiculturalism was at its very beginning. I spent a year studying in France, as part of an exchange program, and fell in love with Paris. I returned to Canada to complete my PhD at the Université de Montréal. I did postdoctoral research at Université Laval and started an academic career. I was living a happy life in Kingston, in the center of “multicultural” Canada and “unilingual Ontario” with my wife and two children when I was invited to consider a permanent teaching position in France. Over the past 18 years, I have enjoyed living in Clermont-Ferrand, a mid-size city surrounded by volcanoes in the center of France. France is an amazing country where, not forgetting my Canadian roots, I can even sometimes go ice skating (see photo).    

At the Université Blaise Pascal, I designed the very first course on ‘Psychologie Interculturelle’ which has been a big success. I published a book in French in 2010 on a multicultural approach to social psychology, and edited in 2006 Social Comparison and Social Psychology: Understanding Cognition, Intergroup Relations and Culture (Cambridge University Press). I have published so far 100 papers in scientific journals and book chapters (including a “must read” in the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives, edited in 2012 by Dan Landis & Rosita Albert).

Please follow me on Twitter: www.twitter.com/SergeGuimond1
Email: serge.guimond@univ-bpclermont.fr
Website: http://lapsco.univ-bpclermont.fr/sites/guimond/

Wes Hansen

Wes Hansen is a graduate instructor and PhD candidate in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota. Wes is also affiliated with the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy & Development, through an international education minor. He is internationally motivated through his experience of living and working in Costa Rica, in addition to his former tenure managing international programs for the International Business Program at San Diego State University. His research interests involve intergroup interactions, perceptions, and behavior within the context of the globalized world and higher education.

In addition to being passionate about his research area, he is also driven in his teaching of intercultural and nonverbal communication, training, pursuit of travel and year-round outdoor adventures, love for language and cultural learning, his family, and the Green Bay Packers American football team. Wes is a new student member to IAIR, and looks forward to upcoming conferences and collaboration among its many internationally like-minded members. Wes speaks English, Spanish, and Portuguese, and holds great pride for his family’s award winning chili.

Email: hans4617@umn.edu
Website: http://comm.umn.edu/gradstudents/profile.php?UID=hans4617

Elaine Hatfield

 

A full 50 years ago I was teaching at the University of Minnesota.  Two of my students, Cookie White (now Stephan) and Walter Stephan, suggested we conduct some cross-cultural research on the topic we were debating.  With the superiority of the truly naïve, I explained that cross-cultural psychology was not an area of interest.  A real scientist wanted to study cultural and historical universals—not the trivial and ephemeral.  But the Stephans persisted . . . and before long I realized how wrong I was.

Today I am convinced that cross-cultural psychology is the Queen of the Sciences.  Without a knowledge of cultural psychology and history scholars are theorizing about a tiny slice of human behavior: viewing not a movie but a snapshot.  I have long been a member of IAIR.  I’ve spent my career studying cultural and historical influences on love and sexual desire, social justice, and emotional contagion.  Luckily, I have had the chance to consult with some of the stars in the field: Shinobu Kitayama, Dan Landis, Hazel Markus, Shalom Schwartz, Cookie and Walter Stephan, among many others.  One of the activities I have most enjoyed is teaching on Semester at Sea—a floating university that travels the world.  On a recent trip in fall 2013, SAS sailed from Southampton (UK) to St. Petersburg (Russia); Hamburg; Antwerp; Le Havre; Dublin; Lisbon; Cadiz (Spain); Casablanca; Accra and Taboraki (Ghana); Cape Town; Buenos Aires; Rio de Janiero (Brazil), Salvadore (Brazil), Havana, Cuba, and Freeport, the Bahamas, ending in Fort Lauderdale.

Dr. Elaine Hatfield is a professor of Psychology at the University of Hawai’i and past-president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality. In 2012, the Association for Psychological Science (APS) gave Hatfield the William James award for a Lifetime of Scientific Achievement. In recent years she has received Distinguished Scientist Awards (for a lifetime of scientific achievement) from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, the Society for the Scientific Study of Sex, and the University of Hawai‘i, and the Alfred Kinsey Award from the Western Region of SSSS.  Two of her books have won the American Psychological Association's National Media Award.

 Recently, Drs. Hatfield and Richard L. Rapson (who are husband and wife) have collaborated on three books: Love, Sex, and Intimacy: Their Psychology, Biology, and History(HarperCollins), Emotional Contagion (Cambridge University Press), and Love and Sex: Cross-Cultural Perspectives(Allyn & Bacon).

Email: elainehatfield582@gmail.com
Website: http://www.elainehatfield.com

Hee Sun Park

Hee Sun Park is a professor in the School of Media & Communication at Korea University. She received her BA in communication from Michigan State University in 1996, MA from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa in 1998, and her doctorate in communication from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2003. Before coming to Korea in 2013, she worked at Michigan State University as a professor of communication. She has taught classes on cross-cultural communication, organizational communication, and undergraduate and graduate level research methods and applied statistics. Her current research projects examine cross-cultural differences in norms and interaction patterns, multilevel aspects of group and organizational communication, and health related social influence processes and outcomes. She received an Early Career Award from the Academy in 2009, and served as an associate editor of the International Journal of Intercultural Research from 2012 to 2014. Since coming back to Korea, she started exercising regularly and taking tennis lessons. Her two dogs (a Yorkshire terrier and a Maltese mix) also seem to be enjoying life in Korea, playing often with Hee Sun’s niece and nephew.

Email: heesunpark321@gmail.com

David Heise

 

My work on cultural norms began with my first paper as a University of Chicago grad student, published as "Prefatory Findings in the Sociology of Missions" in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. My master’s thesis used the Human Relations Area Files, and was published in the American Sociological Review. A later paper using HRAF was "Further Notes on Technology and the Moral Order" published in Social Forces.

While at the University of Wisconsin in the 1960s I began a research program on cross-cultural variations in sentiments and impression-formation processes. That program included the development of affect control theory, which is in continuing development in sociology, psychology, and artificial intelligence. My 2007 book, Expressive Order, summarizes the research program. My 2010 book, Surveying Cultures, merges my career-long interest in measuring cross-cultural variations in sentiments and impression-formation processes with my career-long interest in cultural variations in norms and morality.

I found IAIR late in my career, as a result of querying Dan Landis about his research on Black youths for a 2009 paper. Thus I have attended only the 2013 meeting in Reno where I was bedazzled by receiving IAIR’s Lifetime Achievement Award.  I officially retired from Indiana University’s sociology department in 2002. Since I am averse to travel these days, I spend most of my mornings researching and writing, while afternoons are devoted to hiking in Indiana forests, or splitting wood in order to enjoy the luscious heat of wood fires during Indiana’s cold winters.

Email: heise@indiana.edu
Website: http://mypage.iu.edu/~heise/home.html

Thomas Hippler

I am a senior lecturer in international management at the University of Essex. I am interested in all facets of global mobility management, particularly international assignments and expatriate adjustment. Questions relating to conceptual and methodological considerations in expatriate adjustment research have been at the core of my work for some time. I am also very interested in the motives for seeking or accepting global mobility opportunities.

While doing an undergraduate business degree in my native Germany, I took the opportunity to spend one year in the Republic of Ireland as an exchange student. My interest in international mobility can be traced to this experience and I wrote my primary degree thesis on the experiences of German expatriates in Ireland. I returned to Ireland a year later and started my PhD in international human resource management at the University of Limerick. My PhD topic of expatriate adjustment eventually brought me into contact with the Academy, who very generously invited me to the Groningen conference to present me with an Outstanding Dissertation Honorable Mention Award.

Well-established streams of cross-cultural adjustment research exist in both the management and the cross-cultural psychology literature. Unfortunately, these streams have developed largely in isolation and very little cross-fertilization has taken place. (Notable exceptions do exist!) I hope I can be instrumental in further bridging this gap.

If there were more than 24 hours in the day, I would love to take up table tennis again, which I used to play with little talent yet lots of passion, and visit art-house cinema more regularly.

Email: thippler@essex.ac.uk
Website: http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/staff/profile.aspx?ID=3398

Joep Hofhuis

I was born in the Netherlands, but spent a considerable part of my childhood in the United States. After graduating from high school in Washington, D.C., I enrolled at the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands. In 2012, I was awarded a PhD in organizational psychology on the topic of cultural diversity in organizations. My academic research focuses on how people of different backgrounds work together in teams, and what organizations can do to benefit more from diversity in the workplace. During my time as a PhD student I was introduced to the IAIR by my supervisor Karen van der Zee and her husband Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven.

At present, I am employed as a lecturer in corporate communication at the University of Amsterdam and as a senior researcher in social innovation and diversity at the Windesheim University of Applied Sciences. Furthermore, I work as a freelance researcher, consultant, and trainer for organizations that want to learn how to ‘deal with differences’ and enhance interdisciplinary and intercultural cooperation among their employees. In my spare time, I enjoy riding on my racebike and playing guitar in a blues/folk band.

Email: j.hofhuis@uva.nl
Website: www.joephofhuis.nl

Jacomijn Hofstra

Being a member of a minority group (Frisians) in the Netherlands, intergroup relations have always had my interest. Fortunately, after my graduation from the University of Groningen (social psychology) I got the opportunity to work with Prof.Dr. Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven on a PhD project that focused on the attitude of majority members towards immigrants in the Netherlands. In 2009 I finished my dissertation. After this more or less theoretical research, I wanted to focus more on applied research. For instance, I was interested in how to promote the relations between minority and majority groups in society. Again together with Prof.Dr. van Oudenhoven, I developed a new version of his Intercultural Effectiveness Training (IET). The IET is a multimedia training instrument aimed at the enhancement of intercultural competences of both minority and majority members and is frequently used in the Netherlands by, for instance, educational and welfare organizations. At the moment, I am working at the Hanze university in Groningen on an European project aimed at another minority group in society: young people with a psychiatric disorder. The project is called “Supported Education,” and the ultimate goal is  to reduce premature school leaving of students with psychiatric disabilities. Together with partners in Norway, Portugal, and the Czech Republic, I am working to develop a toolkit—based upon research results from each country—with instruments to help professionals and their organizations who want to start a Supported Education program.

The first IAIR conference that I attended was in 2005, in Ohio, at the Kent State University. I really enjoyed the friendly atmosphere at the conference and decided to become a member!

In my free time, I practice yoga, I like to read books and most of all enjoy being with my children.

E-mail: j.hofstra@pl.hanze.nl

Ying-yi Hong

Ying-yi Hong is a professor at the Nanyang Business School of Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. As a Hong Kong native, she grew up in a Chinese family while being exposed to western cultures in public schools during the British colonial time. After receiving undergraduate education at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, she studied overseas, and subsequently received a PhD degree from Columbia University, specializing in personality and social psychology. She has taught at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) before moving to NTU. Her main research interests include culture and cognition, self, identity, and intergroup relations. Her major research achievement is the formulation of the “dynamic constructivist” theory of culture, which has revolutionized the way cultural psychologists study cultural influences on thoughts, feelings and actions, and has inspired new research directions in the field. She has also examined the psychological underpinnings of important social events that happened in Hong Kong (1997 Hong Kong political transition), the United States (2005 Hurricane Katrina at New Orleans), China (2008 Beijing Olympic Games), and Japan (2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami). She has published over 100 journal articles and book chapters, and her work has been cited widely in the fields of psychology, business, and education (with Google citations over 7,000). Dr. Hong is the recipient of the Otto Klineberg Intercultural and International Relations Award in 2001, International Society for Self and Identity Outstanding Early Career Award in 2004, and Nanyang Award for Research Excellence in 2014, and was elected Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. She likes painting and you can see her painting in the Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity (2014).

Email: yyhong@ntu.edu.sg
Webpages: http://www3.ntu.edu.sg/home/YYHong/and http://www.nanyangbusinessschool.ntu.edu.sg/general/ying-yi/index.html.

Vernon F. Humphrey

humphrey vernon

Vernon F. Humphrey is a PhD candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi; a temporary assistant professor at Columbus State University, Department of Communication; IAIR member since 2007; chairman of the board for the Disability Service Center; member of the Columbus Rotary; CFO American Communication Association; Retired MSG, US Army; married 32 years; a father and skipper (grandfather); son and brother, etc.  My love for and interest in culture sprang from my travels in the U.S. Army. I was diagnosed legally blind in 1992 with a Retinitis Pigmentosa and medically retired six years later. My dissertation research focuses on how couples change their communication skillset after one of them loses the ability to receive visual nonverbal cues due to adventitious blindness and how both partners must change to maintain communication. I plan on a research track of the interaction of culture and disabilities. I am most interested in how people of different cultures perceive and interact with people with disabilities and the societal norms of different cultures and disabilities. I enjoy running, fishing, playing cards, gardening, and spending time with my grandsons (it is amazing how curious they are about the world). I believe each of us is in essence like a rubber band ball. Each event or part of our journey is akin to adding one rubber band after another to a ball. Each new rubber band changes the mass, density, and dimension of the ball and how it will react to outside stimuli, just as the layers of our cultural experiences change how we react to situations. Each layer means we have grown and the point of living is growing. 

Email: vernon.humphrey@eagles.usm.edu

Jane Jackson

Jane Jackson (PhD, OISE/U of Toronto) is professor in the English Department at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). She has teaching and research experience in many countries/regions: Canada, the USA, the Sultanate of Oman, Egypt, Mainland China, the U.K., and Hong Kong. An elected fellow of the International Academy for Intercultural Research in 2002, Jane has attended IAIR conferences in Taiwan, the Netherlands, and the USA. She serves on the editorial board of the International Encyclopedia of Intercultural Communication (Wiley-Blackwell)and is a member of the advisory board of the Language and Intercultural Communication journal.

Her research interests include intercultural communication, language and identity, and education abroad. With the support of competitive research grants, Jane has been investigating the ‘whole person development’ of international exchange students from Hong Kong and Mainland China. Her research has inspired the design of face-to-face and online courses that aim to promote intercultural competence and optimize education abroad learning. As well as many journal articles and chapters in edited collections, recent books include Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication (Routledge, 2014), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Intercultural Communication (Routledge, 2012) (editor), Intercultural Journeys: From Study to Residence Abroad (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010), and Language, Identity, and Study Abroad: Sociocultural Perspectives (Equinox, 2008).

Recognized for innovative teaching practices, Jane is the recipient of CUHK’s 2013 Education Award and a member of the University’s Teaching Excellence Ambassador Program, which promotes effective teaching and learning. She loves to travel and is a keen photographer and hiker.

E-mail: jjackson@cuhk.edu.hk
Webpage: http://www.eng.cuhk.edu.hk/eng/about/academic_staff_detail/21

Lili Jiang

I am Lili Jiang, a doctoral candidate at Göttingen University in Germany. I have been trained and worked as a Chinese instructor at Sichuan University, China. I also studied and focused on foreign language education at State University of New York in the United States and Uppsala University in Sweden. Currently I am based in Germany and research the development of Chinese international students’ identities during the process of their study in German universities. My research interest is focused on study abroad experiences and cosmopolitanism. My first encounter with IAIR started from reading articles in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations. With great excitement, I decided to join the academic family. Outside of my research and study, besides enjoying playing a Chinese traditional string instrument called Erhu/ Chinese fiddle, I am also a modern dancer and choreographer.

Email: ljiang1120@gmail.com
Website: http://www.uni-goettingen.de/de/415903.html

Stefan Kammhuber

Dr. Stefan Kammhuber is a professor of communication and intercultural competence at the University of Applied Sciences Rapperswil, Switzerland, 2010 to the present. He received his diploma as well as his doctorate in psychology at University of Regensburg, Germany.  Additionally, he earned a university degree in speech communication from the same institution. After working as a trainer/coach for rhetoric and intercultural communication for several years he became professor of communication and intercultural competence at the University of Applied Sciences, Koblenz, Germany. In research, he is interested in the theoretical foundations of intercultural learning in order to enhance the quality of intercultural training. Stefan is also keen to understand culture-specific styles of rhetoric and their impact on intercultural impression formation. Stefan has done both intercultural research and training with a wide variety of target groups in Germany and Switzerland including managers, engineers, migration counselors, hospitals, public institutions, and the military. He has (co-)published seven books and 60 articles, most of them in the German language. Stefan was awarded for “excellent teaching performance” in 2008 by the State of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, and recognized for his “outstanding scientific contribution” in 2000 for his doctoral thesis on “Intercultural Learning and Teaching.” Living next to the Swiss mountains and lakes, he enjoys skiing and sailing very much. From time to time he recites poetry and short stories on stage, together with befriended musicians. The most recent program was on Pablo Neruda, his poetic hero. Stefan has been a fellow of the Academy since 2000.

Email: skammhub@hsr.ch

Emiko Kashima

I am an associate professor in the School of Psychology and Public Health at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. I joined the Academy in 2004. I have always been interested in people and cultures from different countries since very young, perhaps due to growing up in Japanese society in the second half of the Showa era, which was quite outward looking and keen to absorb Western influences. A year of living in the United States as an exchange student at the age of 17 made me realise that the US culture was very different from Japanese stereotypes of American life, and that crossing the cultural boundaries is not at all easy. The experiences became the foundation of my later research interests in cross-cultural and acculturation research. After a PhD from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, I relocated to Australia with family which has become our home. My work on psychological acculturation has focused on the effects of social networks, personality, and cultural distance on the adaptation of immigrants and international students in Australia. I also publish on topics related to language use and psychological threat. During my free time I love watching anime. I am currently chief editor of the Asian Journal of Social Psychology until end of 2015.

Email: e.kashima@latrobe.edu.au
Website:  http://www.latrobe.edu.au/psy/about/staff/profile?uname=Ekashima

Daniel J. Kealey

 

Attending the inaugural conference of the Society for Intercultural Education Training and Research (SIETAR) led me to develop a lifelong commitment to research and practice in the field of intercultural relations. For many years, I served as Senior Advisor to the Centre for Intercultural Learning at the Canadian Foreign Service Institute. As a founding fellow of IAIR and a long time contributing editor for IJIR, my interest has been to promote collaboration between researchers and practitioners. My own research on cross-cultural competence has always been focused on finding solutions to problems confronting individuals as they move in and out of foreign cultures. In 1998, having completed my doctorate in social and cultural psychology under the supervision of John Berry, I went on to work as a consulting psychologist and researcher specializing in the screening and selection, training, and performance evaluation of international personnel.  Fortunately, my career as an interculturalist has allowed me to combine both research and practice, and has involved me in work with expatriate managers, diplomats, astronauts, peacekeepers, international students, and international development personnel (both governmental and non-governmental). 

Currently, I live on a lake in the beautiful Gatineau Hills not far from the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  I am working on a book to present my research findings and overall experience in working with international astronauts and mission control personnel to assess their needs for cross-cultural training. I continue to undertake consulting projects when the issue at hand is of interest and one for which I feel I can make a useful contribution.

Email: djkealey@rogers.com

Nigar Gohar Khawaja

I am an associate professor and a clinical psychologist at the School of Psychology & Counselling, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. I have been teaching in professional doctorate and masters of clinical psychology and educational and developmental psychology programs for 15 years. I became a member of the Academy in 2009 and since then have attended all, except one, conferences.   

After completing my masters and postgraduate training in clinical psychology from the University of the Punjab (Pakistan), I arrived in Australia to do my PhD at the University of Queensland. Subsequently, I had the first-hand experience of being an international student. A few years after completing my studies I migrated to Australia and developed an understanding of the challenges of migrants. Along with my other academic roles, I started to work as a cultural and multilingual consultant and a clinician. I revitalised the Psychology and Cultures interest group of the Australian Psychological Society. I have been on the executive committee of this interest group for six years and the national chair for four years. As a part of this interest group, I pioneered and established an ongoing peer support and professional development programs for mental health professionals in Australia.

I research clinical and transcultural issues. Over the last decade, I have investigated the acculturation challenges and psychosocial issues of international students, migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers. I have developed 5 new measures and validated 9 existing measures. I have also developed new culturally appropriate and sensitive treatment programs for international students, migrants, and refugees. This year, I am researching the educational and employment aspirations of adult refugees and factors that promote academic, emotional, and acculturation successes of refugee youth at school. I am also investigating mental health issues of asylum seekers. I find nature very relaxing. I love painting, bushwalking, and just sitting by the deep blue sea gazing at the surf.

Email:   n.khawaja@qut.edu.au
Websites: http://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/khawaja/
http://eprints.qut.edu.au/view/person/Khawaja,_Nigar.html

Grace M. Kibanja

I hold a PhD in social psychology from Makerere University, Uganda, as well as an Msc in research psychology and an honors degree both from Rhodes University, South Africa. Currently, I am a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda. I teach social psychology, community psychology, psychology of gender, and conflict & negotiation management. I am co-author of the book entitled,Escaping from Behavioural Poverty in Uganda: The Role of Culture and Social Capital, that is widely used as a key reference in University Programmes that teach on development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

I enjoy working on collaborative research because it exposes me to the different cultures and learning experiences. It is through collaborative writing that I was introduced to IAIR by my now research partner, Laura R. Johnson. I am part of the GIP GAP (Group on International Perspective on Governmental Aggression and Peace) team that collaborated in research that led to the realization of two books by Kathy Malley-Morrison entitled, International Handbook of War, Torture and Terrorism, andInternational Handbook of Peace and Reconciliation published by Springer in 2013.  I also contributed to a chapter in R. Albert & D. Landis (Eds.), Handbook of Ethno Political Conflict: International Perspective.

I am honoured to be a member of IAIR, through which I have been exposed to the debates and new developments in intercultural discourse. My current research interests include cultural values, gender, civic engagement, and conflict and peace building.

Emails: gkibanja@yahoo.co.uk; gkibanja@chuss.mak.ac.ug

Bryan S.K. Kim

Bryan S.K. Kim is professor and director of the MA program in counseling psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. He received a PhD in counseling, clinical, and school psychology with an emphasis in counseling psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2000. Bryan has over 75 publications, including 2 books and 9 psychological instruments, and 80 refereed presentations in the areas of multicultural counseling process and outcome, measurement of cultural constructs, counselor education and supervision, and immigrant experiences. His current research examines the effects of culture-specific counseling interventions and client enculturation/acculturation (e.g., cultural values) on therapy process and outcome. Bryan is currently editor-elect of Asian American Journal of Psychology and associate editor of Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development.  He also serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Counseling and Development, and Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. Bryan has received research awards from the American Counseling Association and the Association for Assessment in Counseling and Development, and early career awards from the Society of Counseling Psychology, Society of the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, and the Asian American Psychological Association. A member since 2007, Bryan is a fellow of the International Academy for Intercultural Research. He also is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (Divisions 17, 29, and 45) and the Asian American Psychological Association. On the personal side, Bryan is a proud father of two intelligent and personable girls ages 12 (Sydney) and 8 (Courtney).

Email: bryankim@hawaii.edu
Website: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~bryankim/

Yang Soo Kim

I am currently an associate professor in the Department of Speech and Theatre at Middle Tennessee State University, USA.  My research interests are intercultural communication competence and cross-cultural adaptation among sojourners.  This cultural issue captured my interest when I was working   as an expatriate manager in a global organization in a Middle Eastern country.  Working with a multicultural workforce and travelling around the world intrigued me to seriously think about the issue of cultural differences across national boundaries and similarities we share as a human species.  This life experience prompted me to pursue my PhD.

My research about cross-cultural adaptation among expatriate managers has appeared in Asian Communication Research, Human Communication, International and Intercultural Communication Annual, and The Journal of Intergroup Relations.  Also, the study of cross-cultural adaptation among Korean immigrant youth has also been published in the Journal of Intercultural Communication.  I am now interested in bridging theory and practice in the field of global competence and training among global managers.    

I have been a member of IAIR since 2012. I enjoy playing the guitar and practicing oriental martial arts.  The martial art I am most deeply interested in practicing is Gumdo (“Oriental fencing”). 

Email: yskim@mtsu.edu
Website: http://mtweb.mtsu.edu/yskim/

Igor Klyukanov

I work as aprofessor of communication in the Department of Communication Studies at Eastern Washington University http://www.ewu.edu/

I defended my doctoral dissertation, Dynamics of Intercultural Communication: Towards a New Conceptual Framework, at Saratov State University (Russia). I served as an associate editor of The American Journal of Semiotics and am the founding editor of Russian Journal of Communication (Taylor & Francis) http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rrjc20#.UyxiHyiIbBE

Recently I served as chair of the NCA Taskforce on Enhancing the Internationalization of Communicationand chair of the NCA Philosophy of Communication division.

I am interested in intercultural and global communication issues as well as communication theory, philosophy of communication, semiotics, general linguistics, and translation studies. My works have been published intheU.S., Russia, England, Spain, Costa Rica, Serbia, Bulgaria, India, and Moroccoand haveappeared in such journals as Studies in Humanities;The American Journal of Semiotics;The Atlantic Journal of Communication;Arob@ase: A Journal of Literature and Human Sciences;International Journal ofCommunication;International Journal of Applied Semiotics;Language;Individual& Society;Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de FilosofÍa;and Discourse and Society.

My textbook,Principles of Intercultural Communication(Boston, etc.: Pearson Education, Inc., 2005),has been adopted by over 30 colleges and universities intheU.S. My monograph,A Communication Universe: Manifestations of Meaning, Stagings ofSignificance(Lanham,MA: Lexington Books, 2010),won the 2012 NCA Philosophy of Communication Division 2012 Best Book Award. I am also the translator and editor of

Mikhail Epstein's book,The Transformative Humanities: A Manifesto (New York, etc.: Bloomsbury, 2012).

In my spare time I like to travel, read, and play golf.

Email: igorklyukanov@yahoo.com
Website: http://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2013/12/01/igor-klyukanov/

Jutta König

Born in Washington DC in 1955, I grew up a global nomad with my German diplomat parents and had lived in France, Germany, Australia, Africa and the Netherlands by the age of 17. Having experienced English school systems until the age of thirteen, I received my Abitur from the German school in The Hague in 1973 and went on to study clinical psychology in Dutch at Leiden University.

After graduating from Leiden University in 1980, I developed a four-year doctor-patient communication curriculum at the University of Maastricht, a two-year curriculum for managers in health sciences at a polytechnic in Sittard, and a four-year curriculum for organization and information technology at a polytechnic in Leeuwarden as well as raising three sons and completing my Gestalt and Body psychotherapy training at the Frits Perls Institute in Germany.

Between 1994 and 1999 I moved with my husband and three sons to Singapore and worked there as a psychotherapist and career coach with the Singapore American Action Council and in private practice with a host of expat, Asian and hybrid clients. I lectured at Counseling Expats in Asia conferences in Manila, Kuala Lumpur, and Jakarta.

On returning to the Netherlands, I started working as a psychotherapist in private practice and a career coach with Van Ede and Partners, the oldest career coaching and outplacement company in the Netherlands. To my surprise the diversity in Dutch society was not reflected in the clients visiting the company.

I coordinated a project in which Dutch career coaches worked with graduated refugees to learn the intricacies of career coaching in an intercultural setting and published a book of case studies called Birds of Passage: Disillusion and Surprise.

My research interests are global nomads, intercultural communication, narrative and intercultural career coaching, diversity, and business spirituality.

In 2012 I completed my PhD at the University of Humanistics in Utrecht and published Moving Experience: Complexities of Acculturation in which I reflect on my experiences of having grown up in different cultures. I explore other global nomads’ acculturation experiences, using the theory of the dialogical self and exploring embodiment and emotions using the self confrontation method in the narrative paradigm. I have lectured at conferences on the dialogical self in Nijmegen, Braga, Warsaw, and Athens.

I have been a member of the Academy since the conference in Groningen and lectured at the conference in Hawaii. I am currently interested in finding a post doctorate position to continue my research.

Since 2011 I am the chair of the board of the International Career Certification Institute and a board member of the Career Management Institute in the Netherlands. Both organizations certify the quality of career coaches.

I love travelling, swimming in summer, skiing in winter, playing tennis, singing jazz, yoga, chi gong, reading, writing, and meditation.

Email: j.konig@vanede.nl

Kristi L. Kremers

Kristi L. Kremers has been teaching at colleges and universities for the past decade. Her primary research interests include: emotional intelligence, ethics, neuroleadership, applied mindfulness in leadership, and how organizations can adapt an anthropological approach to creating culture and community.  

She is currently a PhD student at the University of Minnesota studying organizational leadership, policy and development. She is also the founder of Lead to Love, a publishing company for children's books. In developing Lead to Love, it is her wish to create tools and resources for families and teachers to instill both a love for leadership and a mindset to lead with love in children. Her first book, Who Is a Leader?, reached #1 on Amazon.com's best seller’s list in three categories.

Email: kristikremers@gmail.com
Websites: www.kristikremers.com; www.leadtolove.com

Larissa Kus

 

Living amongst multiple cultures speaking multiple languages has been part of my life since an early age as my family moved from Ukraine to Estonia when I was 3.5 years.  My interests in different intercultural experiences brought me later to study/live in the USA, Germany, and New Zealand. I studied for my PhD at the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research (CACR) at Victoria University of Wellington, for me, my most memorable social and cross-cultural learning experience. My PhD supervisor, Colleen Ward, introduced me to IAIR, and with her encouragement, I participated at my first IAIR conference in Gröningen in 2007. Since, I was lucky to attend IAIR conferences in Honolulu and Reno. Currently, I am back in Estonia working as a postdoctoral researcher (through the Mobilitas programme)at the Institute of International and Social Studies, Tallinn University. My research is focused on how societal changes and views of the past affect current intergroup relations and subjective well-being of migrants. Besides enjoying doing research, I very much like outdoor activities, especially tramping; baking cakes, and sausages.

Email: Larissa.Kus@gmail.com
Website: https://www.etis.ee/portaal/isikuCV.aspx?PersonVID=38748&lang=&lang=en

Catherine Kwantes

Life experience formed my interest in culture -- growing up the eldest child in a family of Dutch immigrants to Canada, but living in Japan for my childhood.  After finishing high school in Japan, I went to the USA for undergraduate studies, and the rest of my family moved to the Philippines.  In the 1990s, my husband and I (and our four small children!) lived in India for a few years where I completed a cross-cultural dissertation examining work attitudes in engineers. Currently, I am a professor in the department of psychology at the University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.  I hold a PhD and a MA in industrial-organizational psychology from Wayne State University and a MS in clinical psychology from Eastern Michigan University.  I am a Fellow of IAIR and a member since 2004.  My research interests revolve around the development of behavioral and attitudinal norms in organizations--especially how societal culture impacts these norms. The Culture and Organization Research Group, which I supervise at the University of Windsor, is involved in a variety of projects such as the  International Trustworthiness Study, a project spanning 12 nations that examines perceptions of what makes an individual trustworthy in various social and organizational relationships; a project investigating the effects of individual-level culturally transmitted beliefs and values on emotional display norms in the workplace; and experimental research examining the effect of work context on the individual expression of cultural norms.  Travel and experiencing new cultures is always a joy, whether for work or holidays.

Email: catherine.kwantes@uwindsor.ca
Website:  http://www.uwindsor.ca/kwantes
Organization & Culture Lab Webpage: http://web2.uwindsor.ca/ckwantes/lab

Christina T. Kwauk

At the encouragement of my professor, Dr. Gerald Fry, I joined IAIR in 2008 as a doctoral student at the beginning of my studies at the University of Minnesota. Six years later, I completed my PhD in comparative and international development education studying the ways that international sport has influenced the educational trajectories and development imaginations of youth in Samoa and American Samoa.

As a scholar whose work is intercultural, I relish the opportunity to cross boundaries, especially disciplinary and geographic boundaries. In no particular order, my work and research interests span into masculinities and globalization, sport for development policy and practice, and the political economic and sociocultural examination of globalizing food systems on health in the Pacific Islands.

I recently relocated from Honolulu to Washington, DC with my husband. When I am not busy thinking of new research and writing projects, I am learning how to be a mother of a new baby girl, getting back into shape to return to triathlons (or to give marathons a try), and dreaming of surfing the ocean waves once again.

Email: kwauk001@umn.edu

Jonas Rønningsdalen Kunst

 

I am currently a PhD candidate in social psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway. To date, I have only attended the IAR conference in Reno. I would like to use this opportunity to say that it has been the best conference I have been to during my short time as PhD candidate. I immediately felt at home in the Academy and found communicating with its members and contributors very inspiring. This made me decide to join the Academy.

I generally would describe my research focus as quite eclectic. Yet, intergroup relations can be seen as the main overarching topic of most of my research. So far, I have predominantly focused on inter-religions relations and Muslim minorities in the West. When researching inter-group phenomena, I believe in a multifaceted approach, integrating various social psychological perspectives including acculturation, social identity and personal differences. Here, I am lucky to be supervised by inspiring scholars shaping these theoretical frameworks, namely David Lackland Sam from the University of Bergen and Lotte Thomsen from the University of Oslo, Copenhagen and Harvard University.

As many researchers, I, more or less successfully, try to maintain a life outside academia.  Taking a classic acculturation framework, I could be described as a tri-cultural individual, having grandparents born in Lithuania, Germany and Norway. I believe that this cultural background explains why I, in addition to spending time with family and friends, use my free time to learn languages and to travel.

Email: j.r.kunst@psykologi.uio.no
Website: http://www.sv.uio.no/psi/english/people/aca/jonasku/index.html

Carolina Lam

Shortly after meeting Dan Landis in 2009, I became a member of the Academy. It was through the recommendation of my advisor from the University of Minnesota, Dr. Gerry Fry, that I reached out to Dan to learn more about the Academy. I had no idea that there was a phenomenal organization that was located in my hometown of Hilo, Hawai'i. I am a doctoral student at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, in the Organizational Leadership, Policy and Development Department. I hold a master’s degree in international and intercultural management from the School for International Training. I am interested in engaging first-generation college students in successfully completing a study abroad program. I am also fascinated with helping students understand the intercultural interactions that they encounter when they are abroad and even here in the States. 

Currently, I am the director of global education at the University of Hawai'i at Hilo.  It has been wonderful to return to my undergraduate alma mater where I can encourage more students to seek opportunities that will provide them with the tools to become global citizens. 

During my free time, I enjoy blogging, hiking, and hanging out with my family and friends. 

Email: cglam@hawaii.edu
Website: hilo.hawaii.edu/studyabroad

Richard L. Lanigan

Although I was accepted into IAIR in 1998, culture and communication have been a focus in my life starting with my birth (1943) in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I grew up in Albuquerque, later earning a double major in communication and philosophy at the University of New Mexico (B.A. 1967, M.A. 1968) and a doctorate at Southern Illinois University (Ph.D. 1969). I taught communication in El Paso, Texas, then philosophy at Dundee, Scotland, English at Chicago State University, and then was back to SIU, where I retired in 2009 after 40+ years ( I directed 35 doctoral dissertation with students now teaching in some 20+ countries). In 2000, I founded the International Communicology Institute at SIU, an internet research group with conference and project coordination around the world). Over the years, I have been an Andrew Mellon Fellow (Communication, Linguistics, Philosophy) and Senior Fulbright Fellow (China 1996, Canada 2007). I focus my intercultural research on (1) comparative study of P.R. China and the USA (doing a lot of training for folks in both countries), and (2) European philosophy of communication, especially modern French philosophy and human science. In the professional context, my research awards include being elected in 2012 to the Polish Academy of Science (Philology). My books include: The Human Science of Communicology (1992), Speaking and Semiology (1972; 2nd ed. 1991); Phenomenology of Communication (1988); Semiotic Phenomenology of Rhetoric (1984); and Speech Act Phenomenology (1977). My spare time is spent relaxing at the museums or reading at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

E-mail:  rlanigan@mac.com
Websites: PDF publications available:  https://siu.academia.edu/RichardLLanigan
International Communicology Institute:  http://www.communicology.org

Nadezhda Lebedeva

I am a professor in the Department of Psychology and a head of the International Laboratory for Socio-Cultural Research at National Research University ‘Higher School of Economics’ in Moscow, Russia. I have received my MA in psychology at Yaroslavl State University and PhD at the Institute of Psychology, USSR Academy of Sciences. My deep interest to culture was developed during my first jobs at the Museum of Oriental Artsand the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, where I received my first experience of anthropological and socio-psychological field work in Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Ukraine, Estonia, Lithuania, Uzbekhistan, Kazakhstan, North Caucasus (Russian Federation). During these long expeditions I have learned to combine ethnographic and psychological methods of cultural, cross-cultural, and intercultural relations research in my studies.

My recent research interests are acculturation, intercultural relations, values, cultural transmission, cultural change, culture, creativity and innovation. Being a member of IACCP for a long time, I heard from my IACCP friends that my studies are closer to IAIR because after the USSR’s collapse the main topics of my research were intercultural relations, acculturation, and identity change. I have developed with my colleagues the training of intercultural competence and tolerance for schoolchildren, which was successfully adopted in multicultural regions of Russia. This work has made me happy because I recognized that my science might change a world around. In 2014 we have opened double degree MA in applied social psychology with Tilburg University and now have our first international students. In my private life, I love to walk alone in wild nature and talk with my small granddaughter.

E-mail: lebedhope@yandex.ru
Web-site: http://www.scr.hse.ru/

Hye-Eun “Kate” Lee

Hye-Eun “Kate” Leeis an associate professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in the Department of Communicology. She was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. She earned her MA (2005) and PhD (2008) in communication from Michigan State University.

Her research areas include cross-cultural communication issues, interpersonal communication in business settings, and research methods and statistics. One of her major research projects is cross-cultural differences in requesting messages using apology and thank you and the functions of apology and thank you as face work. She is also investigating cross-cultural differences in messages related to physical appearance based on social comparison theory and information processing theory. Finally she has started incorporating more varied processes of intercultural communication. For example, she has been examining why frequent service check-back in restaurants increases customer orientation, customer satisfaction, and tip amount for American customers but not Japanese.

She has frequently published her research articles in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations and has served as a reviewer for this journal for over 5 years. She is on the editorial board of the journal from 2015 to 2017. She is very excited about this opportunity to be a more active member of the Academy. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling, cooking, hiking, and taking pictures of her 8-year-old son, Eugene.

Email: hyeeunlee77@gmail.com
Website: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/communicology

Jason Lee

Jason Lee is a research fellow at the Centre of Social Media Innovations for Communities (COSMIC) in Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. He graduated with a PhD in education from NTU where he investigated the use of social networking sites for social support among exchange students. Jason joined the IAIR in 2010 and attended his first conference the following year in Singapore as a presenter.

Jason’s personal research centers on the use of social media, especially in the field of intercultural communication where he believes that the use of social media will have an increasing impact on intercultural exchanges. His passion on intercultural exchanges comes from his previous experience as an exchange student with AFS Intercultural Programs where he spent a year in Perth, Australia.  Jason currently serves as the vice chairman of AFS Malaysia, and he dedicates his free time to the organization by conducting intercultural communication workshops within the region for other partner organizations.

When Jason is not engaged in work, he enjoys travelling to different parts of the world to soak up the culture, and when back home, cycles on his road bike.

Email: JasonLee@ntu.edu.sg; Jason.Lee@afs.org
Website: http://jason.creaturesville.com/

Chan-Hoong Leong

I am a senior research fellow and the deputy head of Social Lab, a research unit at the Institute of Policy Studies, National University of Singapore. As principal investigator, I lead a research team driving Singapore’s first academic panel study on family dynamics, which involves some 5,000 households and up to 10,000 respondents.

I completed my undergraduate programme at the National University of Singapore, followed by a master of arts degree at the University of Queensland, Australia. I received my PhD in psychology in 2006 from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  

My research interest is focused on intergroup contact, acculturation, and the management of diversity. My recent work explores how the social representation of history influences the construction of national discourses and examines the role and impact of historical narratives in forging a unique Singaporean identity.  

As the geopolitical and economic focus of power shifts to Asia, the location of Singapore at the cross-roads of Southeast Asia will be a vantage position from which to study the dynamic and complex systems in intercultural contact and social change.

I attended my first IAIR conference in 2004, hosted by the Taiwan Normal University. In 2007, I received the first runner’s-up prize for the Rae and Dan Outstanding Dissertation Award at the Groningen Conference in The Netherlands.  

In my pastime, I enjoy keeping up with the latest news on motoring and exploring Singapore’s nature reserves and local street cuisine.

Email: leong.chanhoong@nus.edu.sg
Website: http://lkyspp.nus.edu.sg/faculty/leong-chan-hoong/

Kwok Leung

Kwok Leung received his PhD in social and organizational psychology from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is Chair and Professor of Management at City University of Hong Kong. His research areas include justice and conflict, creativity, cross-cultural research methods, international management, and social axioms. He has published several books and over 150 academic articles in major outlets. His latest book, Psychological Aspects of Social Axioms: Understanding Global Belief Systems, with Michael Harris Bond as co-editor, is published by Springer.

He is the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Management and Organization Review. Previously, he was a Deputy Editor-In-Chief of Journal of International Business Studies, the editor of Asian Journal of Social Psychology, and an associate editor of Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Asia Pacific Journal of Management.
He is the past President of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, a former chair of the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management, and a former president of the Asian Association of Social Psychology. He is a fellow of IAIR, the Association for Psychological Science (USA), the Academy of International Business, and the Hong Kong Psychological Society, as well as a member of the Society of Organizational Behavior. 

He has been a fellow since the early days of the Academy. He has attended several conferences of the Academy, including the conferences at Kent State University (1999), Taiwan (2004), and Singapore (2011).

Travelling is a major hobby for him, which is one of the reasons why he has been researching culture and psychology for over three decades. He also enjoys a variety of sports, music, and reading.

Email: mkkleung@cityu.edu.hk 
Website: http://personal.cityu.edu.hk/~mgkleung/

Romie Littrell

I attended high school in Camden, Arkansas, in the USA, graduating in 1959. My parents had encouraged me toward engineering and science, then 4 October 1957 the launch of the first artificial Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, by the Soviet Union, followed by subsequent failures of the first two U.S. Project Vanguard launches served as a focusing event on the U.S. education systems as a problem and solution. Congress responded in 1958 with the National Defence Education Act, increasing funding for education at all levels, including low-interest student loans to university students, with the focus on scientific and technical education. I enjoyed analytics and problem-solving, so started university in engineering. Over the next few years I found that my lack of attention to details in arithmetic and a greater interest in very complex systems moved me to physics, to philosophy, to psychology. I graduated with a BA in psychology from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. From there I entered the University of Texas in the Department of Educational Psychology, but became involved with computer programming, which allowed sophisticated analysis with the arithmetic left to the computer. This interest led to a career in information technology with LTV Aerospace, UNISYS, Xerox, and IBM. I took an early out from IBM in 1989, worked for myself for a few years, then moved to China to teach (it’s a long story). There I was offered a job by InterContinental Hotels Group in Zhengzhou as a training and HR manager. I received permission to collect management and leadership preference data from the supervisors and managers in our 3 hotels, and turned that into a PhD in organisational behaviour. This kicked off my career in cross-cultural psychology and leadership studies. I took posts at the Glion Hotel School in Switzerland, teaching HR, then taught international marketing and management at the Hochschule Aalen & Graduate School Ostwürttemberg. While in Germany I attended the 2001 IACCP regional conference in Pultusk, Poland, and met Dan Landis, who inspired me to join the International Academy for Intercultural Research. In 2002 I accepted a post in international business at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, where I earned a 2nd PhD in applied psychology. My major non-work interest is the education and development of my 13-year-old daughter, Lee.

Email: Permanent email: romielittrell@yahoo.com, work: romie.littrell@aut.ac.nz
Websites: University URL: http://www.aut.ac.nz/profiles/business/associate-professors/romie-littrell
Personal URL: http://romielittrellpubs.homestead.com/Index.html

Annet te Lindert

Since the IAIR conference in Groningen, I am an IAIR member. I presented my paper about Iranian immigrants in the Netherlands. I became secretary of the Academy in 2008. At the time, Ken Cushner was president, Dan Landis was past-president, and Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven was president-elect.  John Berry, Dharm Bhawuk, Rosita Albert, Colleen Ward, and Cookie and Walter Stephan were board members at the time. The latter documented the first by-laws and Jenny Abe and I made the first IAIR minutes. It was a beautiful time.  I have warm memories of our board meetings in Hawaii at the university, and I especially enjoyed the hospitality of the board members living in Hawaii, Bhawuk, Cookie, and Walter.

My name is Annet te Lindert. I study clinical, personality, and crosscultural psychology, and I’ve worked as a practitionor and counselor, as well as an assistant professor at several universities in the Netherlands. Currently, I work as a politician for the Dutch Christian Democratic Party and as a researcher. My topics of interest are ethnic hierarchy, discrimination, trauma, and resilience with the Self Confrontation Method.

My husband and I have two teenage sons, and we live in Capelle aan den IJssel. I love ice skating, cycling, ballet, and classical music.

 

Email: alindert@xs4all.nl

James Hou-fu Liu

 

James Hou-fu Liu is a professor and head of the School in Psychology at Massey University in New Zealand. He moved there recently after 20 years at Victoria University of Wellington (VUW), where he was co-director of its Centre for Applied Cross Cultural Research (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr).  He obtained a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the University of Illinois and worked as an aerospace engineer in Los Angeles. He then completed a PhD in social psychology at UCLA, followed by a post-doc at Florida Atlantic University.  He taught at VUW from 1994-2014, and has been a Fellow of IAIR since 2011.  His research is in cross-cultural, political, and social psychology, specializing in social representations of history and their relationship to identity and intergroup relations. Recently, he has become interested in digital influence and the creation of global consciousness through the internet. Culture and culture change, viewed through lenses from indigenous to global fascinate him. He has 150+ publications, including New Zealand Identities: Departures and DestinationsRestorative Justice and Practices in New Zealand, and Progress in Asian Social Psychology, Volumes 2 and 6.  He was editor-in-chief of the Asian Journal of Social Psychology from 2008-2011, and is currently president of the Asian Association of Social Psychology.  Born in Taiwan and a fluent Mandarin speaker, he is now a naturalized citizen of two countries, describing himself as a “Chinese-American-New Zealander.” He edited a special issue of IJIR in 2014 on critical junctures theory, a new interdisciplinary theory of the rise and fall of sovereign states.

Email: j.h.liu@massey.ac.nz

Kevin D. Lo

I completed my PhD in international management (Asia-Pacific focus) in 2007 at the University of Hawaii.  Upon completing my degree, I was faculty at the University of Auckland Business School in management and international business.   I have been an assistant professor at the University of San Francisco, School of Management, Department of Organization, Leadership, and Communication since March 2011. 

My interests in cross-cultural studies stem from a trio of influences:  being American by nationality, being Chinese by ethnicity, and being born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Cross-cultural studies have helped me to understand these different influences and afford me greater insights into the ways that I think and behave.

My research and teaching focus on cross-cultural management and organizational behavior.  More specifically, I am interested in international service-learning, cross-cultural uses of social media in business, cross-cultural perceptions of time orientation, and interpersonal business relationships in a cross-cultural context. 

I have been a member of the Academy since 2009 when the meeting was held in Honolulu.  Outside of my professional activities, I love playing with my chocolate lab (named Kona), swimming, practicing yoga, and quality cuisine. 

Please let me know if you are coming to the San Francisco Bay Area.

Email: kdlo@usfca.edu
Website:  http://www.usfca.edu/Faculty/Management/Kevin_Lo/

Ying (Candy) Lu

Dr. Ying Lu (Candy) is a lecturer in international business and international human resource management at the Department of Marketing and Management, Macquarie University, Australia. Her research interests are in the areas of cross-cultural management, international human resource management, organisational psychology and occupational health and safety.

Candy obtained her PhD degree from Monash University in 2012. Utilising both quantitative and qualitative methods, her thesis investigated the acculturation strategies of Chinese professionals in Australia and the impact of the strategies on their job satisfaction, affective commitment and work engagement. Candy is interested in how immigration and acculturation affect immigrant employees’ attitudes towards work and their psychological well-being in host countries.

She became a member of the Academy in 2012, after having a paper accepted by the International Journal of Intercultural Relations. She hopes to attend the IAIR 2015 conference that will be held in Norway.

Outside of her professional activities, Candy enjoys playing table tennis and watching movies.

Email: candy.lu@mq.edu.au
Website: http://www.businessandeconomics.mq.edu.au/contact_the_faculty/all_fbe_staff/candy-ying-lu

Aini Maznina A.Manaf

I am an assistant professor of communication at the International Islamic University Malaysia. My research interests are in the areas of organizational communication, Islamic communication, media studies and intercultural communication. I obtained my degrees in communication, specifically an MA from the International Islamic University Malaysia and PhD from the University of Queensland, Australia. My PhD thesis focused on the influences of ethnic diversity on group communication.

In 2011, I was honored to receive a postgraduate bursary award at the Australia and New Zealand Communication Association Conference (ANZCA) which was held in Hamilton, New Zealand. I have also reviewed several manuscripts submitted to the International Journal of Intercultural Relations (IJIR).

I have been a member of IAIR since 2011 upon recommendation from my supervisor. Recently, I have extended my research domain to issues of race and ethnicity within Malaysian society, mainly on the infleunces they have on organization and media. Some of my non-academic interests include cooking, travelling and reading novels and magazines.

Email: ainimaznina@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.iium.edu.my/irkhs/Aini%20Maznina%20A.Manaf

Anita Mak

Anita Mak, BSocSc, MSocSc (Hong Kong University), PhD (Australian National University) is professor of psychology at the Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Australia. She has held visiting appointments with the University of British Columbia, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Polytechnic University of Hong Kong, and Griffith University. She served on the IAIR Board from 2009 to 2013 and has thoroughly enjoyed the IAIR conferences in Honolulu, Singapore, and Reno.

Her interests in intercultural education and research have stemmed from her personal experiences as an international student and an immigrant in Australia. She has published extensively in intercultural relations, sociocultural competence, internationalisation, stress, coping, and mental health.

Anita has completed many consultancies in staff and leadership training and diversity research in Australia and internationally. She is co-developer of the EXCELL (Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership) Program, an evidence-based training program for developing students’, immigrants’, and expatriates’ sociocultural competencies (http://www.excellinterculturalskillsprogram.com). EXCELL has been introduced into over 100 institutions in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the UK, and the Netherlands.

Anita was awarded a national Carrick Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning in 2007 for her leadership in enhancing students’ development of cross-cultural awareness and social skills. She is the leader of the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Priority Project on “Internationalisation at Home: Enhancing Intercultural Capabilities of Business and Health Teachers, Students and Curricula,” which aims at improving cross-cultural communication in educational and practice settings in business and health (https://sites.google.com/site/internationalisationathome).

She enjoys travelling and reading.

E-mail:  Anita.Mak@canberra.edu.au
Website: http://www.canberra.edu.au/faculties/health/courses/psychology/staff-profiles/mak-anita

Elena Makarova

I am originally from the Ukraine, where I studied educational sciences at the National Pedagogical University of Kiev. Since 2009 I have held the position of senior researcher and lecturer in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Bern, Switzerland, where I received my PhD. Currently, I am working as a research fellow of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.

I became a member of the Academy in 2010, having applied for IAIR membership during my research fellowship at the Centre for Applied Cross-Cultural Research at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. My first biennial conference of the Academy was in Singapore in 2011 and I am looking forward to attending the upcoming conference in Bergen in 2015!

My research interests are acculturation, ethnic identity development, intercultural relations, and immigrant and minority youth adjustment in the school context. Based on research on cultural diversity in Swiss schools I recently published contributions addressing teachers’ acculturation attitudes and their classroom management, hidden school dropout among immigrant students, and the meaning of courses in the language and culture of origin and their impact on youth development in cultural transition.

Among my favorite non work-related activities are spending time with my family, meeting friends, reading, and acryl painting.

Email: elena.makarova@edu.unibe.ch
Website: http://edu.unibe.ch/content/app/mitarbeitende_app/dr_elena_makarova/index_eng.html

Melody Manchi Chao

I received my B.A. degree in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Currently, I am an assistant professor in the Department of Management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Before pursuing graduate school, I worked in a substance abuse treatment agency that provides prevention, intervention, and treatment services to Asian American communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. My experiences working with the communities ignited my research interest in understanding multicultural experiences and intercultural relations. My research investigates the dynamics of psychological processes in intercultural contexts. It focuses on how individuals actively participate in cultural processes and how they negotiate between conflicting cultural values and norms. Specifically, my research dissects how such unspoken assumptions as psychological essentialism can have profound social psychological implications for individuals living in a diverse environment, such as intrapersonal psychological processes, interpersonal dynamics in cross-cultural interaction contexts, as well as intergroup relations. Besides research and teaching, I enjoy swimming and would participate in competitive swimming for fun. My favorite event is Medley Relay, because I get to swim with my teammates and, more importantly, we get to cheer (jump and scream) for each other. I also love to sing. I am a member of the choir. Recently, I have started to learn Bel Canto singing and am still at the exploration-frustration stage. Hopefully, I will have worked pass this stage by the next Academy conference in 2015.

Email: mchao@ust.hk
Website: http://www.bm.ust.hk/mgmt/staff/mchao.html

Jeanette Martin

 

Coming to academia late I actually made mistakes that are discussed in Intercultural Business Communication, Essential Guide to Business Etiquette, Global Business Etiquette, and Passport to Success written with my co-author Dr. Lillian H. Chaney; and Managerial Communication (in press) written with Dr. Reginald Bell. Working in business is what made me interested in intercultural communication. So when at 38 years of age I went back to get a doctorate, it was no surprise that my dissertation was in the field of intercultural business communication.  I have to say the term “global” seems to fit better than intercultural at this juncture in the field, but that is another article.

I was very honored to be asked to write a chapter in IAIR’s Handbook on Ethnic Conflict. The fact the book has been well received is a testament to Drs. Landis and Albert. Fortune took me to the University of Mississippi where Dr. Landis also taught, and then to Sietar and IAIR through Dr. Landis. I have been a member of IAIR almost from the beginning. Although I retired last fall, writing is still an important part of my life particularly global business communication.

Beyond academia my husband and I like to travel via motor home or plane.  We just finished our 18th year spending time in Mexico. We both enjoy Mexico. One thing I have always wanted to do but did not have time to do was learn to quilt, so last fall I started quilting as a hobby also.

Email: jmartin@bus.olemiss.edu

Judith Martin

I am currently professor of communication in the School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. After completing my PhD in speech communication at the Pennsylvania State University, I held a joint appointment at the University of Minnesota in the Office of International Education and the Speech Communication Department—taught intercultural communication, conducted cross training for faculty, students, and staff, administered a student exchange program, and began my lifelong interest in researching the sojourn experience.  Joining the faculty at ASU in 1990, I expanded my research focus to include interethnic and interracial communication, and most recently the role of culture and new media.    

Over the years I have been active in various professional organizations including NAFSA: International Association of International Educators, International Communication Association (ICA), Society for Intercultural Education and Training (SIETAR), and the National Communication Association (NCA). Due to these other association commitments I've been absent from IAIR for many years, but happy to be back!

I have published research articles in various communication and related journals and co-authored two textbooks in intercultural communication with Thomas K. Nakayama: Intercultural Communication in Contexts and Experiencing Intercultural Communication. Along with Pauline Cheong and Leah Macfadyen, I co-edited New Media and Intercultural Communication: Identity Community and Politics and with Thomas K. Nakayama, Whiteness: The Communication of Social Identity.

When I'm not writing or teaching, I love spending time with my extended family, watching movies, traveling, and hiking in the Arizona desert.

Email: judith.martin@asu.edu
Website: http://humancommunication.clas.asu.edu/content/judith-n-martin

David Matsumoto

Dr. David Matsumoto is a world-renowned expert in the field of facial expressions, gesture, nonverbal behavior, culture, and emotion. He has published over 400 articles, manuscripts, book chapters and books on these subjects. In addition, he is the Director of Humintell, a company that provides training to individuals and organizations in these fields.

Matsumoto is also a professor of psychology at San Francisco State University. He is the founder and director of SFSU’s Culture and Emotion Research Laboratory. The laboratory focuses on studies involving culture, emotion, social interaction, and communication. 

In addition to his work at SFSU and Humintell, Matsumoto serves as editor-in-chief for the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. Matsumoto is also an editorial board member for Personality and Social Psychology Review, Asian Journal of Social Psychology, Asian Psychologist, Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, Motivation and Emotion, Cognition and Emotion, Human Communication, Journal of Comparative Family Studies, andArchives of Budo.

Matsumoto is also the owner and head instructor of the East Bay Judo Institute in El Cerrito, California.  He holds a 7th degree black belt as well as Class A coaching and referee licenses.

Email: contact@davidmatsumoto.com
Website: www.davidmatsumoto.com
URL for Humintell: www.humintell.com

Thomas Mattson

I earned my PhD from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa with a degree in international management.  I am currently an assistant professor of management at the University of Richmond.  My current research focuses on information systems and technology-related topics.  As such, I do not study culture in the same manner as many of the members of the Academy, but I still consider myself a researcher of different cultures.  I primarily investigate occupational cultures and how individuals within and between different occupational cultures interact in online environments and/or interact with different information systems.  I investigate in-group and out-group interactions similar to many cross-cultural researchers, but the groups and subgroups that I investigate are not typically based on national boundaries.

Email: tmattson@richmond.edu

Claude-Hélène Mayer

Currently, I am visiting professor at the Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology at the University of South Africa in Pretoria, Republic of South Africa. I am also an adjunct professor at the European-University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) and a senior research associate at the Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South Africa.

My research focus is on positive psychology concepts, such as salutogenesis, a sense of coherence and mental health in transcultural organisations and management contexts. At the moment, I am leading an international research project on gender, culture, and spirituality in institutions of higher education.

I joined the IAIR after having attended the IAIR conference in Hawaii in 2009, which I really enjoyed. I hope I will soon be able to attend another conference of the Academy.

I thoroughly enjoy travelling, dancing and singing, walks in nature, writing, and exploring life with my three kids.

Email: claudemayer@gmx.net
Website: www.interkulturelle-mediation.de

Kelly McKay-Semmler

I am an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of South Dakota, teaching courses in intercultural and intergroup communication; interpersonal communication; public speaking; and empirical research methods.  My research interests include the role of communication (interpersonal and mass) in the cross-cultural adaptation process, from both the perspectives of newcomers and host members of receiving societies. I received my PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 2010, completing a dissertation that examined the role of interpersonal communication in the adaptation of Hispanic youth to the dominant cultural values and practices of the larger U.S. society. In 2011, I was honored to receive the International Communication Association (ICA) Intercultural Communication Division’s dissertation award for this work. More recently, I have been investigating the role of local media depictions of immigrants and immigration on host community members’ attitudes toward immigration-related issues. I attended the biennial conferences of the Academy in Hawaii, Singapore, and Reno, NV, and have been a member since 2011.  I have served as the Academy’s sectary since fall of 2012. Some of my non-academic pursuits include canoe camping in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota; hiking; indoor and outdoor horticulture; and stray/feral cat rescue. 

 

Email: kelly.mckay-semmler@usd.edu
Website: 
http://www.usd.edu/faculty-and-staff/Kelly-McKay-Semmler

Karen Medica

 

My background is in international development and humanitarian assistance, and to date I have worked in this area for over 20 years. In this capacity I have worked across cultures in South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Maldives); South East Asia (Philippines, Indonesia); and the Pacific (Timor Leste, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu). I am currently completing my PhD research on cultural identity change, looking at a case study involving Indonesian PhD scholarships funded by the Australian aid program and seeking to understand the acculturation and re-entry experience of the awardees. The key journal that is referenced in my thesis is the IJIR, so it’s not surprising that I was interested to join IAIR when encouraged by one of your members – Kerry Cronin (believe it or not we met because he was the priest who presided over my dear mother’s funeral last year - it's amazing what places and in what contexts we meet people!). My research interests include intercultural change, international public policy, community development, program design and evaluation. I still work in the aid sector as a contractor whilst studying, and in 2013, I worked in Papua New Guinea and Samoa and also selected international awardees for two Australian aid-funded scholarships. I look forward to being engaged with the Academy and perhaps one day holding office but still keeping space in my life for family, friends, swimming and yoga.

Email: Karen.medica@monash.edu
Website: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/karen-medica/13/83a/aa2

Mark E. Mendenhall

Mark E. Mendenhall holds the J. Burton Frierson Chair of Excellence in Business Leadership at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. He received his BS degree (1980) in psychology and his PhD (1983) in social psychology, both from Brigham Young University. In 1998, he held the Ludwig Erhard Stiftungsprofessur Chair at the University of Bayreuth. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Saarland, Vienna University of Business and Economics, and Reykjavik University. Mark is an internationally recognized scholar in the field of global leadership and international human resource management.

Mark has published numerous journal articles and scholarly book chapters, and has co-authored many books as well, the most recent being: Global Leadership: Research, Practice and Development (2nd edition, 2013, Routledge). A firm believer in applying findings from the research literature on intercultural competence, he actively consults organizations in the area of global leadership and intercultural effectiveness. He is a partner in The Kozai Group, a consultancy that specializes in global leadership identification, assessment, and development. Mark is active in the Academy of Management, and is currently past president of the International Management Division of that organization.

His avocations include genealogical research, football (keen follower of the Premier League and the Bundesliga), and theological history. Mark spent his formative years in New Zealand, where he grew up in a small, multicultural community near Hamilton, New Zealand, and maintains that his “emotional/cognitive software” is a least one-third Maori, if not more.

Email: Mark-Mendenhall@utc.edu

Rebecca Merkin

I have been a member of the IAIR for over 10 years. I first heard about IAIR from Dr. Kenneth Cushner who was a member of my doctoral committee at Kent State University. I was a runner up for the IAIR Doctoral Dissertation Award and was curious about the organization so I attended the convention for the first time in Oxford Mississippi. I find the work of IAIR members to be aligned with my interests so I have enjoyed the sessions at the different meetings over the years.

I have an MBA, and my PhD focused on organizational and intercultural communication. I teach at Baruch College – CUNY which is a business school in the Department of Communication Studies. My two main research interests are: 1. Issues related to national culture and behavior—in particular as it relates to saving or losing face, and 2. Problematic intercultural work relationships such as sexual harassment in the workplace. I am presently working on a book related to the first area of interest.

Besides for academic life, I live in New Jersey with my husband and am presently experiencing the joys of empty nesting.

Email: Rebecca.merkin@baruch.cuny.edu
Website: http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/wsas/academics/communication/rmerkin.htm

Sydney Merz

Hello! My name is Sydney Merz, and I am a PhD candidate at George Mason University, Virginia, USA. I serve as an adjunct instructor, teaching undergraduate education foundations courses, as well as a graduate research assistant for two professors. My research interests focus on teachers’ and prospective teachers’ perceptions and understandings of diversity and intercultural education in their current/future educational settings. Additionally, my dissertation “Intercultural Understanding of Teacher Educators” explores one university’s teacher education programs that actively and explicitly have taken steps to expose their prospective teachers to multiple cultural perspectives.

Prior to my doctoral studies, I was a United States Peace Corps volunteer, serving 27 months as an English teacher in a small Armenian village and an additional tour as a teacher educator at Visayas State University, Philippines. Working and living outside my home country pushed me to explore myself as a cultural being as well as the intercultural attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed for meaningful interactions. While living in each country, I also learned their languages, offering authentic experiences as a second language learner.

I have an interdisciplinary background that embraces recreational management and sports programing combined with adult and higher education learning. I enjoy travelling, the outdoors, and reading a good book in a hammock. I am very excited to be a part of the IAIR team and thrilled that Ken Cushner put the Academy on my radar. I look forward to meeting you all!

Email: smerz2009@gmail.com

John Miller

I am an associate professor of national security studies at the Air Command & Staff College (ACSC), Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, USA. I serve as course director of Culture and Regional Studies, a core offering in ACSC’s online master’s program, and also teach in the school’s resident program. I hold a doctorate in communication studies from Ohio University, where I taught intensive English for 12 years. I have over 13 years overseas experience as an educator in Liberia, Korea, Japan, and the former Soviet Union, including a 3-year stint as an associate Peace Corps director in Ukraine.

My interest in intercultural communication began when, as a college freshman, I met my first roommate, Eddy, a Haitian immigrant. This interest continued during the 6 years I worked as a juvenile probation officer and led me to join the Peace Corps as an English teacher assigned to a village in rural Liberia. Stateside experience includes three years as an associate professor at the Defense Language Institute where I designed language immersions and trained teachers. Since coming to ACSC, I have authored avatar-driven online scenarios and field simulations for intercultural competence training.

In 1999, I was elected to the Phi Beta Delta honor society.  I joined IAIR in 2005 and attended the 2013 conference in Reno. My research currently focuses on the application of constructivist pedagogy to teach intercultural competence and critical thinking. In my spare time, I serve lunch weekly at the Salvation Army, read widely, write poetry, and play the guitar—badly.

Email:  john.miller.77@us.af.mil
Website: www.linkedin.com/pub/john-miller/7/909/a2

Frank F. Montalvo

There is a great line from a book by Peter Höeg, Smilla’s Sense of Snow, about how as soon as you truly sense a culture it eludes your description, like snow. I sensed cultures from a young age growing up in NYC, and knew race and ethnicity were inseparable in America. I left to attend UCLA for undergraduate and an MSW, where I learned about living in a co-operative with international students and from helping to start a chapter of the first “inter-everything” (nations, cultures, races, religions) fraternity in the United States in 1950. Then, I was drafted. I managed a commission as a clinical social work officer in psychiatric clinics and developed a pre-adoption screening program overseas for military couples and German children’s homes to assure both were able to meet the needs of children who often suffered from severe maternal deprivation in post-war Europe. An additional eight years on staff at a psychiatry residency program and child guidance clinic at the Presidio of San Francisco focused on impact of separation and war trauma on families. Meanwhile, I completed a doctorate in social work at USC. I was assigned as behavioral science consultant to the Pentagon to head an Army-wide service program for separated families. As a staff officer, I also had the good fortune of first being on the ground floor of the military’s efforts to combat racial tensions during the Vietnam era, and second consulting with Dan Landis on research on race relations and the field of intercultural relations. I retired soon after helping to start the Department of Defense Race Relations Institute, the first of its kind in the United States in the early 70s, as Chief of Minority Studies. Those experiences were key to my focusing on teaching, research, and publishing on Latino acculturation. Two key products resulted: “Mexican American culture assimilator for child welfare workers” and an interdisciplinary, experiential course on “psychology of the bicultural environments.” During that time, I was an active member of SIETAR International where I received the outstanding interculturalist award, in part for starting a cross-cultural  specialization in social work, directing the SIETAR International conference in San Antonio, Texas, and co-editing its proceedings. I was among the founding members of IAIR serving as its initial vice president, chair of the membership committee, and member of IJIR’s review board to help get it started. I retired professor emeritus. My interest has been on applying research to the ethnocultural experience, with a concern for the impact of skin color on Latino mental health, depression, and practice included in the 20-some articles published with colleagues over the years. My current effort is reviewing the research on the affect of skin color on assimilation and the implicit racial bias of counselors in the psychosocial treatment of Latinos.

Email: jmfm114@yahoo.com

Mike Moodian

Hello, everyone. My name is Michael A. (Mike) Moodian and I have been a member of the International Academy for Intercultural Research (IAIR) since 2006. I am the editor of Contemporary Leadership and Intercultural Competence (Sage, 2009), a book I am proud to have collaborated on with several IAIR members. I have been a faculty member at Chapman University since 2007, where I teach for its College of Educational Studies, and serve as an assistant professor of social science at Brandman University, Chapman’s new affiliate. I hold a doctorate degree in education from Pepperdine University.

Beyond my academic endeavors, I am active with numerous Orange County, CA, nonprofit groups. Recently, I completed a one-year term as chairperson of the World Affairs Council of Orange County. I also serve on the consultative school board for my alma mater, Santa Margarita Catholic High School, and the board for the UC Irvine Olive Tree Initiative, a program that focuses on Turkey-Armenia and Israel-Palestine conflict analysis and resolution through rigorous academic preparation, experiential education, and leadership development. In addition, I write for the news media on local public policy issues.

My wife Margaret and I have been married for three years. We live in Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, with our rescue dog Manny and chinchilla Marshall.

Email: drmike@moodian.com
Website: www.moodian.com

Robert Moran

I was born 75 years ago in Toronto, Canada and am healthy and about 67.25% retired. But I dare not use the word “retirement” in the presence of my spouse of 43 years.

I have never thought of myself or tried to be a good researcher. But being aware of, using, and then translating good and relevant research so that I can incorporate aspects into what I teach has been a lifetime goal. When I began teaching at Thunderbird, a very pragmatic and applied business school, awarding graduates an MBA, I was not a very good instructor. However, now 38 years later, I am quite a good educator and can influence the students and executives I have the privilege to interact with. I learned and benefitted most by sitting at the back of a room watching great professors “educate,” and I borrowed. The 9th edition of my first book, Managing Cultural Differences, was published in March 2014, and interested faculty can check out how my co-authors and I have borrowed research and applied aspects to a business context in a global, complex, and rapidly changing environment by going to: www.routledge.com.

At times my life was “out of balance” with work being the culprit. Now, with 5 adult children, seven grandchildren, and some relationships that go back to a time when I didn’t have even one white hair, I am trying to make this right.

Thanks for reading.

Email: robert.moran@thunderbird.edu

Kyoung-Ah Nam

Kyoung-Ah Nam, PhD, is an assistant professor in the School of International Service at American University, Washington, DC, where she is also a member of the Advisory Council of Intercultural Management Institute (IMI), the former Business Council for International Understanding Institute (BCIU).

She has 18+ years of experience in intercultural training, cross-cultural communication, international education, and global leadership developmentboth in the U.S. and abroad. Her research and teaching interests include cross-cultural communication, maximizing study/work abroad, expatriate training, intercultural leadership, and interaction between international faculty and U.S. students. She has taught at the University of Minnesota, Concordia University, and American University.

Kyoung-Ah is on the faculty of the Summer Institute of Intercultural Communication (SIIC) in Portland, Oregon and has served as a special correspondent for Radio Free Asia. She has worked with key international organizations and multinational corporations as an external consultant and as an employee in Asia and North America, including American Councils for International Education,eBay, Fulbright, International Olympic Committee (IOC), Korea International Trade Association, LG Electronics, Microsoft India, Ogilvy & Mather, Siemens, Samsung, 3M, UNESCO, and the United Nations.

She earned a PhD from the University of Minnesota in international education and intercultural training, and has served on the scholarship committee of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research (SIETAR-USA).

Originally from Korea,she has traveled and worked in 40+countries andenjoys playing piano, tennis, yoga, and swing dance. She has been an Academy member since 2006, attended the conferences in Groningen (2007), Hawaii (2009), and Reno (2013), and is looking forward to meeting everyone in Norway in 2015!

Email: nam@american.edu
Website: http://www.american.edu/sis/faculty/nam.cfm

Luciara Nardon

I am an associate professor of international business at the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. I grew up in Brazil, did my graduate education in the United States, moved to Belgium, and finally settled in Canada. My research explores the role of culture on management and work practices, with particular emphasis on identifying skills and processes required to succeed in multicultural environments, including intercultural competence, cross-cultural communication, international assignments, and technology mediated work. I have taught graduate and undergraduate courses focusing on international management in Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, and the United States. In addition to academic articles, I am a co-author of three books, Managing Across Cultures (with Richard M. Steers and Carlos Sanchez-Runde, Cambridge, 2010 & 2013) and Managing in the Global Economy (with Richard M. Steers, Sharpe, 2006) and am currently working on a book on developing intercultural competence (under contract with University of Toronto Press). I am excited to become a member of the Academy and am looking forward to meet likeminded people in Norway. In my free time I love travelling, cooking with my family, and practicing Tai Chi.

Email: Luciara.nardon@carleton.ca
Website: http://sprott.carleton.ca/directory/nardon-luciara/

Sorin Nastasia

I am Sorin Nastasia, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Communication Studies at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (SIUE). Several of my mentors and my collaborators are affiliated with IAIR and have encouraged me to join. I am from Romania, in Eastern Europe, where I earned a BA in languages and literatures and MAs in American cultural studies, international relations, and public relations, and I worked as an international relations counselor for the Ministry of Culture and then as a public relations counselor for the Ministry of Education. I came to the United States to pursue a PhD in communication and public discourse at the University of North Dakota. At SIUE, I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in public relations (including an international PR study abroad that has taken students to Lyon, France and Bucharest, Romania in 2012 and to Munich, Germany and Budapest, Hungary in 2014), persuasion, and intercultural communication. My research topics include: comparing public relations practices in Western and Eastern European countries with U.S. models; responses of various communities and populations to internationally mediatized disasters and crises; and examinations of media portrayals of underprivileged populations. On these topics, I have presented over 100 papers at regional, national, and international conferences, and I have published several journal articles and book chapters. I am currently finalizing a co-authored book on perceptions of children internationally of the 2011 Japan disasters. I serve on the Leadership Council of the College of Arts and Sciences and as Faculty Senator at SIUE, and as secretary of the Intercultural Communication Division of the International Communication Association. In my free time, I enjoy spending time with my wife Diana and our two daughters, Daria and Alexia; together, we like to travel, swim, watch movies, and listen to music.

Email:snastas@siue.edu
Website: http://www.siue.edu/artsandsciences/acs/sorinbio.shtml

Dennis Nigbur

Like many researchers, I have professional interests informed by personal history. Growing up in Germany with its central position in European geography, history and politics, how could I not be sensitive to how people relate to other nations and to their own group’s burdens and accomplishments? In a changing former industrial heartland, a melting pot of economic migrants and their descendants, how could I not become interested in how people get by and get along, in ways involving the traditional and the personal? In an area where football unites a diverse population and re-divides it according to club affiliations with their own cultural symbols and customs, how could I not learn how much people’s identifications matter…and that Schalke 04’s blue and white are the most important colours in the world! Living and working in Canterbury with its mix of rich English history and mainland European feel, and with family in France, Austria and Spain, how could I not be fascinated by European migration and multiculturalism, and Europe’s colourful tapestry of cultures?

When not working as a social psychologist of culture (a description that I think makes me sound very sophisticated!) I teach at the lovely Canterbury Christ Church University. In my free time, I like spending time with my friends and family, enjoy sport actively or passively, cycle around Kent’s beautiful landscape, cook, and try to improve at playing mandolin. I have been a member of the Academy since 2008 and look forward to many more years.

Email: dennis.nigbur@canterbury.ac.uk
Twitter @DennisNigbur
Websites: http://tinyurl.com/DNprofile; http://www.multiculturalismforum.org

Jesse E. Olsen

I received my PhD in organizational behavior from the Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, Georgia, USA). As I was completing the program, I was honored to receive the Rae and Dr. Dan Landis Outstanding Dissertation Award. This provided me with an intimate introduction to the IAIR, and the fantastic opportunity to attend the conference in Singapore. I really enjoyed the community and diversity of the IAIR, which has helped me to learn about other areas of research that could add much value to my own work. I have gladly maintained my membership (and really enjoyed the Reno conference last year).

My research has primarily focused on diversity management and international/cross-cultural management. I have also worked on projects that deal with developing globally competent human resources in Japan, and I am now starting work on virtual work and virtual teams. My first academic job was at the Solbridge International School of Business (Daejeon, South Korea), followed by three years at Kwansei Gakuin University (Nishinomiya, Japan). Just this April, I began a new position as a research fellow at the University of Melbourne's new Centre for Workplace Leadership (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia).

Before graduate school, I was the international exchange coordinator at Kwansei Gakuin University, and then a business project manager in the Merger Integration Office and Corporate Strategies Group of SunTrust Bank (Atlanta). I enjoy spending time with my wife and three children, including going to parks and watching movies (mostly of the superhero, sci-fi, and comedy genres).

Email: jesse.olsen@unimelb.edu.au
Website: http://www.findanexpert.unimelb.edu.au/display/person656729

Randall E. Osborne

I am a Professor of Psychology at Texas State University and have taught there since fall of 2001. 

I received my PhD in social psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1990.  My background is in social psychology but my teaching interests range from introductory psychology and forensic psychology to interdisciplinary courses on hatred.  A research focus of mine that crosses over into my teaching—both how and why I teach the courses I teach—is the development of intercultural sensitivity.

As human beings, we share a tendency to ask “why” questions.  We want to know— indeed, may need to know—why people (ourselves included) do the things they do.  In my case,  the “why” question always seemed to separate me from others, accentuating philosophical and personal differences with my father to more pedestrian debates concerning similarities and differences among and between people.  In an effort to understand why people hate, I charted a path that moved toward exploring impression formation processes in general, and the path from ordinary bias to directed hate in particular.  As a parent, I can say that my son, Joseph, reminds me of the urgent need to understand and to deconstruct hate, and it is his willingness to learn from me and from others that reminds me of the silver lining of hope beneath the dark clouds of hate.  Hate need not perpetuate.  My wife (of 29 years) and I love to travel and my membership in the Academy and presentations at International conferences (ICAP, IACCP, etc.) have helped me most appreciate the importance of intercultural work.

Email: ro10@txstate.edu
Website: www.psych.txstate.edu

Shari Paige

I earned my doctorate under the advisement of one of the most inspiring women, Dr. Elaine Hatfield, at the University of Hawaiʻi Mànoa. Submerged in the unique culture of Honolulu, I wrote about, lived, and experienced the richness of several cultures. Within a month of beginning my graduate program in 2008, I had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Dan Landis, who went on to guide me through my masters and doctorate work. I couldn’t have asked for a better doctoral committee who encouraged my thirst for writing about culture and identity.  Dr. Landis introduced me to IAIR, and joining the Academy was a natural choice.

I grew up in Southern California, the melting pot of our nation. This diverse environment shaped my identity and approach as a researcher. I became fascinated with social identity and the saliency of cultural and religious affiliations.

Upon returning to California I taught at California State University, Fullerton and Chapman University. While lecturing at Chapman I wrote about topics ranging from emotional contagion to acculturation. Since completing my PhD I have begun exploring more artistic projects. I enjoy creative writing on the weekends and taking photographs of graffiti art in Southern California. I hope to capture graffiti art within gendered spaces and continue writing about the thing I am most passionate: culture!

Email: SPaigePhD@gmail.com

Nektaria Palaiologou

I am an assistant professor of intercultural education in the Department of Early Childhood Education-School of Education of the University of Western Macedonia. I have conducted studies working in the broad field of intercultural education for the last 20 years. Currently, I also serve as an elected board member of the International Association for Intercultural Education (IAIE) and as Associate Editor of the journal, Intercultural Education. In addition, I direct the Hellenic Association for Intercultural Education (HAIE), an official chapter of IAIE in Greece, focusing on research in intercultural and human rights education. In 2009, in cooperation with the IAIE, the Hellenic Migration Policy Institute, and under the aegis of UNESCO, I organized an international conference in Athens, Greece entitled, “Paideia, Polity and Demoi.” I have written three books on intercultural education (in Greek), which are taught at Greek universities in teachers’ education departments, and I have translated and edited in Greek two international books (Gundara’s: Intercultural Europe: Diversity and Social Policy and Banks’ Diversity and Citizenship Education). In August 2011, I published a special issue as guest editor of the journal Intercultural Education entitled, “Intercultural Education: New Century, New Needs. Conceptual and Empirical Challenges” (vol 22, no 4). My recent book, Mapping the Field of Multicultural/Intercultural Education Worldwide: Towards the Development of the New Citizen, was published in 2012 by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. My current research interests include educational and citizenship issues for migrant children in Greece, and teachers’ education and training in the field of intercultural education.

Email: nektarpal@hotmail.com
Website: http://users.uowm.gr/nekpalaiologou/?q=en

Hana Panggabean

panggabean hana

I am a full professor and a psychologist in industrial/organizational psychology at the Faculty of Psychology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia in Jakarta, Indonesia. I was awarded a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the Faculty of Psychology, University of Indonesia in 1994. Upon completion, I worked in the field of human resources management for a few companies for 3 years. Throughout my academic and professional years, I have developed a passion and keen interest in Indonesian cultural values and their influences on individuals’ and groups’ behaviors in the workplace. I pursued my interest by studying intercultural psychology and was conferred a PhD degree from the University of Regensburg, Germany in 2002. My research interests cover areas of diversity management, cross-cultural leadership, intercultural competence, and organizational culture. I have held various management positions in Atma Jaya Catholic University in the past 14 years, which lead me to university management as another research interest. I have been a member of IAIR since 2003 and participated in the Taiwan conference (2005), as well as the Singapore conference (2011). My leisure time is spent with good books, interesting movies, and fun travelling.

E-mail: hana.panggabean@atmajaya.ac.id ;  hanaatmoko@gmail.com

Fotini Papoudakis

Fotini Papoudakis is associate professor at the Department of Business and Public Administration of the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of the Peloponnese, Greece.

She earned her PhD at the University of Edinburgh on EU politics and policies and has published articles on political and administrative culture. She has taught courses on social and political institutions, comparative local government, and culture.  

She was for seven years Erasmus Institutional Coordinator of the TEI of the Peloponnese and has organised and attended several international conferences. She is a member of the Political Science Association (PSA) and the University Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES).

Her research interests include European politics, comparative political culture, solidarity and civil society, and social and political development.

She joined the IAIR in 2001, attended the 2001 IAIR conference, and has been a reviewer for the IJIR.

She has two dogs and four cats—all rescued—and enjoys gardening and walking on the beach.

Email: fot.papoudakis@outlook.com

Jason D. Patent

I was born and raised in a highly monocultural part of the United States—Western Montana—but was always curious about other cultures, especially China, since my father’s stateless-Jewish family had fled Shanghai not long after the communist revolution in 1949. After a BA in East Asian studies, I went to China in 1991, and found that my fancy college education had left me utterly unprepared to interact respectfully with human beings whose perceptions, thinking, and behavior differed so radically from mine. I didn’t know it at the time, but that’s when I became an interculturalist in spirit.

In the two-plus decades since, I have hopped the Pacific dozens of times. My dear spouse is a historian of China, and we adopted our two daughters, now 13 and 11, from China. A decade ago I received my PhD in linguistics from UC Berkeley, which gave me a rich set of tools for analyzing culture through language. My professional life has consisted mostly of academic administration, though I also worked in the private sector for four years and have taken every opportunity I can to teach, consult, and train. I joined the Academy in 2009.

Having returned to the San Francisco Bay Area in 2014 after a decade away, including two three-year stints working in China, I currently direct the Center for Intercultural Leadership (CIL) at UC Berkeley’s International House, which around 600 Cal students, postdocs, and visiting scholars from 60+ countries have called home for 85 years. CIL is in its first year, and we plan to create research projects that will help us figure out how best to leverage our staggeringly rich intercultural environment to advance intercultural learning. Please be in touch—we welcome your suggestions!

Email: jasonpatent.com@gmail.com
Websites: http://ihouse.berkeley.edu/cil; http://www.jasonpatent.com

Jacqueline Peters

I am a doctoral student in linguistics at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  My interests are in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, intercultural communication, language and ethnic identity, and intercultural interactions in social institutions.  My dissertation research site is MAB-Mackey Rehabilitation Centre in Montreal, Quebec, which is my home.  There I will be looking at contextualization cues that are known to differ between cultures to see whether there is significant variation in the interactions between White English-speaking clinicians and their White English-speaking clients and White English-speaking clinicians and their Black English-speaking clients.  I am at the recruitment stage of the study, and I am very excited to enter the data gathering stage.  My previous research focused on the communicative styles of non-European Canadians, specifically Black Canadians of Caribbean descent both here in Toronto and in Montreal.

I have lectured in introduction to sociolinguistics at Concordia University in Montreal in the Department of Classics, Modern Languages, and Linguistics.

When not studying in cafes with my fellow students, I relax by walking my dog, reading sci-fi/fantasy, or knitting.

Being new to the field of intercultural communication, having come from a background of sociolinguistic variation and change, I have only recently discovered the Academy.  Last fall, I attended the “Perspectives on Interculturality” in St. Louis, Missouri, and I am looking forward to attending other related conferences.

Email: jepeters@york.ca
Website: http://www.academia.edu/

Margaret (Maggie) Jane Pitts

I learned the importance and necessity of competent intercultural communication early in life. I was brought up with a family business in which we hosted several international tour groups weekly at our riding stables in Tucson, Arizona, USA. I was exposed to multiple languages and a variety of cultural ways of “being” and “doing.” Because of these early experiences, I have always felt comfortable among and intrigued by multiple cultures. I began to formally study language and culture as an undergraduate student at Arizona State University where I took a BA in French and in Communication. I also studied abroad in Montpellier, France during my junior year. My experiences abroad were so life changing that I decided to pursue a career researching and writing about intercultural communication. I completed my masters and PhD at Penn State University (2005) with a focus on intercultural communication. For my dissertation, I returned to France for 6 months to conduct an ethnography of US students studying abroad in Paris. Now, several years later, I am an assistant professor of communication at the University of Arizona where I continue to explore the intersections of intercultural and interpersonal communication. I have an on-going longitudinal investigation of study abroad and re-entry experiences among student sojourners. I teach courses in intercultural communication and participate in our departmental study abroad program in Orvieto, Italy. Although I am only recently a member of IAIR (2011), I am a longtime and avid reader of IJIR. I am indebted to the members of IAIR for their excellent scholarship that continues to motivate and inspire my own work.

Email: mjpitts@email.arizona.edu
Website: http://comm.arizona.edu/user/maggie-pitts

Michael H. Prosser

Michael H. Prosser (PhD, University of Illinois, 1964) is a founder of the academic field of intercultural communication, having chaired three founding conferences in 1971, 1973, and 1974; serving as the founding chair of the Speech Communication Association Commission for International and Intercultural Communication (1971-73); being the third chair of the International Communication Association’s Division of Intercultural and Development Communication; and becoming an inaugural member of the Governing Council for the International Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research (1974-1977), later Vice President (1983-84), and President (1984-86).

He has been honored with the Ball State University Outstanding Alumnus Award (1978); the International Communication Association Award (1978); SIETAR International Citizen of the World Award (1986) and its Outstanding Senior Interculturalist Award (1990); Fulbright Professor, University of Swaziland (1990-91); Fusion International Research Award named for him and K.S. Sitaram (2000); China Semimonthly Talent Magazine featured article (2005: in Chinese) and Special China Association for Intercultural Communication Awards for Teaching and Research on Intercultural Communication in China (2009, 2011).   As a Fellow in IAIR, he was the keynoter for the Academy’s 2013 conference. He is listed in the Marquis Who’s Who in American Education, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in Asia, and Who’s Who in the World. He has a page in Wikipedia.

He has taught approximately 11,400 students in Canada, China, Swaziland and the US: teacher of Latin at Urbana Illinois Junior High School (1960-63); University of Buffalo (Assistant Professor, Speech Communication, 1963-69); Indiana University (Associate Professor, Speech Communication, 1969-72); University of Virginia (chair, Speech Communication, 1972-77, Professor, 1972-2001, Professor Emeritus, 2001); United States Information Agency, Training Department, and Consultant, 1977); University of Swaziland (Fulbright Professor, (English Department,  1990-91); Rochester Institute of Technology (William A. Kern and Distinguished Visiting Professor in Communication, 1994-2001); Yangzhou University (Professor, College of Foreign Languages, 2001-02, Distinguished Professor, 2013-14); Beijing Language and Culture University (Distinguished Professor, College of English 2002-05); Shanghai International Studies University, Distinguished Professor ( College of English, 2005-07; College of Communication and Journalism, 2007-09); Ocean University of China (College of Communication  and Journalism, spring, 2011); and Institute for Shipboard Education/University of Virginia Semester at Sea Around the World Study Voyage, Faculty Coordinator, Life Long Learners, autumn, 2011).

Prosser has also been a visiting or adjunct professor at Queens College, CUNY, summers 1966, 1967; California State University, Hayword (summer, 1971); Memorial University of Newfoundland (summer, 1972); St. Paul University and the University of Ottawa (summer, 1975): Kent State University, 1978);George Washington University (spring, 1994); and SUNY College at Brockport (1997-98).

A few of his most recent major books include:

Kulich, S. J. & Prosser, M.H. (Eds.) (2007). Intercultural perspectives on Chinese communication: Inter-cultural research: Vol.1.
Kulich, S. J., Prosser, M.H., & Weng L.P. (Eds.) (2012). Value frameworks at the theoretical crossroads of culture: Intercultural research: Vol. 4.
Kulich, S.J., Weng, L. P., & Prosser, M. H. (Eds.) (2014).Value dimensions and their contextual dynamics across cultures: Intercultural research: Vol. 5.
Li, M. & Prosser, M.H. (2012). Communicating interculturally.
Li, M. & Prosser, M.H. (2014).  Chinese communicating interculturally.
Prosser, M. H. (forthcoming). A journey to the East: Asia in focus.
Prosser, M.H., Sharifzadeh, M., & Zhang, S.Y. (Eds.) (2013).Finding cross-cultural common ground.

Prosser was also the series editor for Civic Discourse for the Third Millennium, with seventeen books published for Ablex, Praeger, and Greenwood Publishing Group (1998-2004), and is a  senior coeditor  with Steve J. Kulich for the Intercultural Institute of Shanghai International Studies University Intercultural Research Series, with seven volumes published (2007-present). He chaired the 1980 SIETAR International Congress, and he and K.S. Sitaram co-chaired six Rochester Intercultural conferences (1995-2001). Prosser is chair of the International Advisory Board of the Institute; he is also a member of the Board of the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Journal (in Asia). He and Steve J. Kulich were the coeditors of ‘’Special Issue: Early American Pioneers in America,’’ IJIR (2012 November). Prosser has given fifteen keynote addresses in China, India, Russia, and the US, and has been interviewed frequently on the China Central TV Dialogue program, on the Shanghai International Channel, and China Radio International. He is a member of the United Nations Association and President of the Rochester, New York Chapter (1997-98).

His book, The Cultural Dialogue (1978, 1985, 1989), was translated into Japanese in 1982 by Roiche Okabe and in 2013 into Chinese by He Daokuan. Cui Litang’s and his book, Social Media in Asia, includes essays on social media in 14 Asian countries. His book in progress, A Journey to the East: Asia in Focus, is largely autobiographical and covers his Asian experiences from 1974 to 2014.

Prosser’s major academic interests include intercultural, international, and global communication and media; the United Nations; China; cross-cultural dialogue; and rhetoric and public discourse.

Michael has three children and nine grandchildren. He has been the host father for exchange students and refugees from Sweden, Belgium, France, Spain, Brazil, El Salvador, South Africa, Swaziland, and Sudan.

Email: prossermichael@gmail.com
Website: www.michaelprosser.com

Gui Qingyang

I am a professor in the School of English Language and Culture, Zhejiang International Studies University, China (http://www.zisu.edu.cn/), currently a PhD student in the Department of Translation, Lingnan University, Hong Kong (https://www.ln.edu.hk/), and used to work as a postgraduate visiting scholar in the School of English Studies, University of Nottingham, UK. At the moment, I am engaged both in writing my PhD dissertation, based on my research project of The Collective Identities of the Translators in July School in Contemporary Chinese Literature, supported by the National Social Science Foundation, and in re-translating Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, a part of the New Edition of A Treasury of World’s Classics, to be published by Flower City Publishing House, Guangzhou in 2014. I am a new member. The pace of my entry to this great and merry band of IAIR has certainly been accelerated by my direct links with Professor Wenshan Jia, who initiated the Intercultural Communication Workshops for Advanced University Teachers, organized in 2008 both by the United States TriWon Global Inc. and China Jiliang University where I used to work as the dean of the School of Foreign Languages and the director of the Institute of Language and Communication. I am a member of the China Association for Intercultural Communication since 2006. Just to list a few publications to indicate my research interests: 1. Lu Yuan's Chinese Rendition of Faust: A Classic Translation with a Heightened Sense of Intercultural Communication, Chinese Translators Journal, 2007(6). 2. Beware of Blind Westernisation of TEFL in Asia: A Chinese Case Study, Asia TEFL, 2005(2). 3. Inter-cultural Communication Optional Course Design for Non-English Majors: A Case Study at CJLU, at the thirteenth International Intercultural Communication Conference and the seventh Symposium of China Association for Intercultural Communication, Harbin, 2007. Some of the non-academic activities I deeply enjoy are jogging, table tennis and singing, which make me grow as a person.

Email: gqy118@126.com;qingyanggui@ln.hk
Website: http://www.zijin.net/blog/user1/8551/index.shtml

Ujvala Rajadhyaksha

I am Fellow and member of IAIR since 2005 when I attended my first IAIR conference at Kent State University at Ohio, USA. The conference coincided with the anniversary of the historic Kent State shootings - conference attendees stood for a moment of silence to remember innocent students who lost their lives on that day. As an international attendee, the conference and its members made an impression on me with their genuine commitment to promoting intercultural awareness. Although I have been unable to attend another IAIR conference since, I have continued to be a member of the Association and follow articles published in the IJIR journal.

You could say I developed acute intercultural awareness mainly through my experiences of growing up female and working in the male-dominated field of management in India’s gender unequal culture. I have a doctoral degree in management with a specialization in organizational behavior from the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad India. My academic career took me to various parts of India – Indian institute of Management Calcutta in the eastern region of the country and Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in the western part of India. I have also lived and worked briefly in China and now in the United States for a decade. My personal experience of juggling work and life in tandem with my spouse across three countries and multiple cultures got me deeply interested in issues pertaining to work and family, intercultural, cross-cultural and gender issues in management. I have been fortunate to be involved in research work that comes close to my calling – I have been the India collaborator in a multi-national work-family research project that is exploring the role of culture in the work-family interface (http://www.workfamilyconflict.ca/member.php?id=76).

Currently I work as Associate Professor at Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Indiana in the Department of Business Administration and Economics. I teach courses in the management area and bring to them an intercultural and gender perspective. Some of my courses are cross listed across the business, intercultural studies and gender and women’s studies departments. My research work is in the area of work and family issues, cross-cultural and gender issues in management. My regional focus is presently on South Asia. I serve on the editorial board of the South Asian Journal of Global Business Research (SAJGBR) and have a country perspective article that captures most of my research interests titled, “Work-Life Balance in South-East Asia: The Indian experience” in the inaugural issue of the journal in 2012. I have experience with intercultural training especially for women business travelers traveling to South Asia.

During my spare time I enjoy listening to various genres of music – Hindustani classical, Western classical, Bollywood film music, Marathi bhavgeet, jazz, blues, classic rock and pop – with my young son. With family, friends and homes in Asia and North America, intercultural work is more than something I do for a living - it defines who I am.

Email: urajadhy@saintmarys.edu

Stephanie Rohac

rohac stephanie

After having lived and worked in France for one year, I completed a bachelor’s degree in international management and a master’s degree in communication psychology. Besides my postgraduate studies, I have worked in an internationally operating IT company. As head of international marketing, I had to coordinate our local marketing departments in more than 28 different countries in an attempt to realize our approach of differentiated standardization.

Inspired by this truly cross-cultural work and my deep passion for cultures, I have developed my research interests for individual’s cross-cultural competencies. I pursued my doctorate in intercultural communication at TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Intercultural Communication (Prof. Dr. Michael B. Hinner). In my dissertation, I developed a model of cross-cultural metacognition as gradual problem-solving ability, which is suggested to enhance individual’s cross-cultural flexibility. I was awarded a stipendiary for my dissertation project from the European Union and the State of Saxony.

Also, I am teaching leadership and communication competencies at diverse universities with a focus on change management.

I am convinced that there is a growing organizational demand to assess and train individual’s cross-cultural flexibility and self-regulated learning ability. Also, cross-cultural competencies should not only be applied to national cultures, but also to corporate cultures and team cultures. As a consultant, trainer, and coach focused on communication and change, I am actively working with cross-cultural issues every day.

I like to spend my free time with my family. When travelling, I really like to “absorb” the peculiarities of different cultures. Also, I really enjoy any kind of sports activity in our wonderful nature.

E-Mail: stephanie@kommunikation-bewegt.org 
Website: http://www.kommunikation-bewegt.org/

Marya S. Rozanova

Dr. Marya Rozanova is an associate professor at the Institute of Law (St.Petersburg, Russia), doctoral candidate at St. Petersburg State University (faculty of political science), and a director of the Migration Policy Program at the Institute of Applied Research (St. Petersburg, Russia).

Since 2007, she has headed a St. Petersburg NGO called the Center for Civil, Social, Scientific and Cultural Initiatives "STRATEGIA"—that specializes in tolerance promotion, migration processes, and migrant integration in contemporary Russia.

Dr. Rozanova holds a philosophy degree (MA) from St. Petersburg State University, a law degree (MA) from the North-West Academy of Public Administration, and a PhD from St. Petersburg State University.

She specializes on migration policy and integration of migrants. From 2007 to 2013, she directed a project on strengthening the principles of tolerance, and building constructive intercultural communication between young peoplein multiethnic classes at schools in St. Petersburg. Altogether, over 3,200 school students were enrolled in this project.

From 2010 to 2013 she was the head of the project on adaptation and integration of the students coming from Ingushetia (North Caucuses region) at Admiral Makarov State Maritime Academy.  In 2012, Dr. Rozanova was given a personal commendation from Gov. Y. Evkurov (Ingushetia) for her significant contribution to the strengthening of friendship between peoples. 

Her most recent book, Migration Processes and Challenges in Contemporary Russia (St. Petersburg Case Study) (Washington D.C., 2012), was devoted to the migration processes in contemporary Russia and St. Petersburg, migration policy, and migrants’ integration (url: www.wilsoncenter.org/publication/migration-processes-and-challenges-contemporary-russia-st-petersburg-case-study).

E‐mail: marya.rozanova@yahoo.com
Website: http://genlingnw.academia.edu/MaryaRozanova

Nice Rule

Nick Rule is assistant professor of psychology and Canada Research Chair in Social Perception and Cognition at the University of Toronto. Nick (ironically a native of Florida) started at the University of Toronto in 2010 just after completing a PhD in psychology at Tufts University with the late Nalini Ambady. He joined the Academy the same year with the intention of presenting at the biennial conference in Singapore but ended up not making it. His research broadly investigates questions related to how it is that people perceive and form impressions about each other. Much of this focuses on questions about whether people are able to do this accurately. For example, Nick is probably best known for his program of research examining the accuracy of judgments of sexual orientation from minimal cues conveyed in people’s faces. In another line of similar research, Nick has explored the predictive validity of inferences of personality traits from the faces of leaders in business, law, and politics. In all of this research, he takes a multi-method approach to tackling these questions at different levels of analysis, ranging from the micro-level observation of specific brain areas to the macro-level investigation of systematic differences across nations and cultures. In his free time (of which there is little—he is being evaluated for tenure this year), Nick likes to apply his training as an experimental scientist in the kitchen and to spend time with his husband and their breathtakingly beautiful Maine coon cat (pictures eagerly offered upon request).

Email: rule@psych.utoronto.ca
Website: psych.utoronto.ca/users/rule

Bernard Saint-Jacques

Dr. Saint-Jacques is now Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He was born in Montreal and to obtain his BA he had to go through the 8 years of the Cours Classique: 6 years of literature, languages and classical Latin and Greek and 2 years of philosophy. At Montreal University, he took one MA in French literature and a second MA in philosophy.  Then, Bernard wanted to see the world! He read in an English newspaper that a big language school in Tokyo was looking for instructors in French, English, and German. He was fluent in the 3 languages and was accepted immediately. After a few years of teaching, he decided to study Japanese. He became so proficient in this language that on the phone nobody would know that he was not Japanese until he had to say his name. Being able to read and write in Japanese he took a MA in Japanese culture and religions at Jochi University in Tokyo.

Having been awarded a Ford Foundation fellowship, he went to Georgetown University and took a MS in psycholinguistics. Then, invited by the renowned French linguist André Martinet, Bernard went to Paris and did a first doctorate; the title of the thesis was Analyse Structurale du Japonais modern, which was published both in French and English. The second doctorate, Doctorat ès Lettres et Sciences Humaines, the title of the thesis was Aspects Sociolinguistiques du Bilinguisme Canadien. It was published by the International Centre for Research on Bilingualism at Laval University.             

He then became professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of British Columbia. His main research interests and publications were in sociolinguistics, second language learning, communication, Japanese culture and society. After 22 years at UBC, he took early retirement to accept a position as Head and Professor in a graduate program in intercultural communication at Aichi Shukutoku University in Nagoya. He has lived 25 years in Japan.

Prof. Saint-Jacques has published and edited 8 books and has written more than 100 papers in scientific journals in English, Japanese, and French. He has been a guest speaker of several universities in Japan, France, Canada, and the U.S. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and 6 years ago was granted by the Japanese government the prestigious honor of “The Order of the Rising Sun.”

Email: bsaintj@telus.net

Michael Salzman

Michael Salzman is a professor and chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. He has been a member and regular conference presenter at IAIR since 2001 and is now a “fellow.”  He is a licensed psychologist and has published in the areas of intercultural conflict and cooperation; the psychology of colonization and decolonization; intercultural sensitivity training; multicultural counseling; cultural trauma and recovery among indigenous peoples; and the effects of globalization on culture and anxiety. He has worked with diverse populations as a teacher in an inner city Brooklyn community, a clinician in a community mental health center in South Tucson, AZ, a researcher and school counselor in the Navajo Nation, a coordinator of a model rural mental health program serving Native Alaska, and an advisor in a Native Hawaiian Leadership project in Hawai‘i. Michael has been at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa since 1997, first as a counselor educator and now as the chair of the Department of Educational Psychology. He recently contributed a chapter entitled, “Ethnocultural Conflict and Cooperation in Hawai’i” to the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives and a chapter in the just published book, Internalized Oppression: The Psychology of Marginalized Groups. Michael is currently working on a book entitled, A Psychology of Culture: Culture and Human Needs. He enjoys exercise, the café life, good company, and conversation. He hopes that his teaching, research, and service contribute to the construction of a better world through the promotion of social justice, respect, equality, and understanding among peoples.

Email: msalzman@hawaii.edu
Website: https://coe.hawaii.edu/directory/?person=msalzman

Toshi Sasao

Toshi Sasao is a social and community psychologist, an elected fellow of the American Psychological Association, a tenured professor of psychology, education and peace studies at International Christian University (ICU: www.icu.ac.jp), Tokyo, Japan (since 1997), and also a foreign professor in the Institute of Psychology, University of Opole (UO: www.uni.opole.pl), Poland (since 2010). At ICU, Toshi currently directs its Interdisciplinary Peace Studies Program. He received his PhD at the University of Southern California after his BS (psychology) and MEd (educational psychology) at the University of Washington prior to the era of Starbucks and Bill Gates.

A “global nomad,” as he is called by his colleagues and friends, Toshi extensively travels and splits his time mostly in Europe, the U.S., Japan, and Korea for teaching and conducting local and cross-cultural field research. Under the general theme of “promoting well-being of individuals and communities in globalizing and multicultural contexts,” Toshi’s current research focuses on designing and implementing innovative research with disenfranchised groups around the world and developing an intervention/evaluation model (“Life Resources Model”) for Japan’s minority and immigrant communities (zainichi Koreans and Brazilian Japanese) with cross-cultural comparison in Korea and Brazil. 

Toshi enjoys teaching around the world; not simply giving one-time presentations, but engaging in face-to-face dialogue, extended teaching, and research with students and colleagues of diverse cultural backgrounds and experience. In his spare time, wherever he may be, Toshi loves good coffee over good books, and, in fact, is quite a coffee connoisseur in his own opinion. For some time now, Toshi likes to read Scott Turow’s legal thrillers as well as classic mysteries. Toshi also enjoys good BBQ with his family and church friends on weekends. One of his annual family traditions for the past 20 years has been to celebrate Christmas at his home with his students (old and new), colleagues, and good friends from around the world.  

Email: sasao@icu.ac.jp; tsasao1@gmail.com

Ann C. Schauber

I have been a member of the Academy since 1999. I am an emeritus professor from Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon, USA. During my tenure, I worked with people through the Extension Service, the branch of the land-grant university that takes research to the people to apply in the community. As the first diversity leader for the OSU Extension Service, I worked with faculty and staff throughout the state and the nation to increase their awareness and skills in intercultural communication and building more inclusive workplaces.

My joy is to synthesize current research and make it easy for the layperson to understand and apply. My book, Working with Differences in Communities: A Handbook for Those Who Care about Creating Inclusive Communities, was published in 2002. My doctoral research focused on intercultural communication and organizational climate towards greater inclusivity of cultural differences.

Upon retirement in 2006, I founded Caracolores, LLC, a consulting business that focuses on creating greater inclusivity at the individual, group, and organizational levels. I work primarily with educational, governmental, and non-profit organizations.

My most recent work has been to apply the intercultural perspective to people as spiritual beings—the dimension of ourselves concerned with the meaning of our existence. I studied for ten years at a mystery school in Whitefish, Montana where I learned about a typology of energetic differences in humans. I find that the intercultural perspective and the spiritual perspective inform each other. I am currently blending these two perspectives in my work.

Email: ann@caracolores.com
Website: http://caracolores.com/

Joseph Schwarzwald

schwarzwald joseph

I am a social and organizational psychologist, professor emeritus from the department of psychology at Bar Ilan University, Israel. I am currently teaching at the Ashkelon Academic College.

My main interests and most of my publications are in three areas: 1. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. My research in this area was conducted during my military reserve duty in the Israeli Defence Forces. 2. Intergroup relations.

My interest in this field arose after an educational reform act in the Israeli educational system that strove to achieve social integration between Middle-Eastern and Western students. Integration as a situational contingent was a central theme of my studies. Among other things, I compared religious with secular public schools which provided contrasting settings for determining conditions that may facilitate or hamper the goal of integration. 3. Social power and influence. I started my research in this area after spending a sabbatical year at UCLA working with Professor Bertrham Raven, who developed the power interaction model of interpersonal relations. This model defines 11 power tactics that an influence agent can exercise in order to get compliance from an insubordinate target person. The model also delineates social-cultural, situational, and personal factors that are involved in the choice of influence tactics. After conducting several studies in the field, I together with Professor Meni Koslowsty, have recently reconceptualized the model as a sequential process involving antecedents, a mediation principal, and the choice of power tactics as outcomes.

I was a guest editor for the IJIR for a special issue dedicated to the subject of prejudice, discrimination, and conflict and served for many years on the editorial board of our journal.

E-mail: Joseph.Schwarzwald@biu.ac.il
Website: http://faculty.biu.ac.il/~jschwarz; http://psychology.biu.ac.il/Schwarzwald

Ulrike Schwegler

schwegler ulrike

Living and working in Indonesia for eight years was a life-changing experience for me and the catalyst for my studies in cross-cultural psychology, trust within and between organizations, and the role of trust in post-conflict regions. The questions of how people variously construct their lives amidst cultural preconditions, cultivate friendships, work effectively, manage conflict, and enjoy life despite frequent hardships continue to fascinate me.

My first contact with IAIR was at the Taipei conference in 2004. It was the beginning of wonderful and long-lasting friendships with colleagues and researchers from all over the world. I soon became a member of IAIR and have attended most of the conferences since.

As a professor of organizational psychology at the FOM University of Applied Science in Stuttgart, Germany, I teach courses on leadership, social psychology, organizational psychology, and research methods. I am more convinced now than ever of the importance of intercultural communication as an interdisciplinary issue, and I include cross-cultural aspects in all of my courses.
In addition to my role as a professor, together with colleagues, we founded the Institute for Applied Trust Research in 2008; through the institute we serve as consultants for companies and non-profit institutions.

Whenever I have time I enjoy backpacking and hiking, whether it is the granite slopes and silence in the Alps, the Andes highlands, or the tropical rainforest of the Borneo jungle.

Email: Ulrike.schwegler@ifavf.de; Ulrike.schwegler@fom.de
Websites: http://www.fom.de/studienorte/studium-in-stuttgart.html; http://www.ifavf.de/

Ehsan Shahghasemi

I was born and raised in Mamasani, in the south western part of Iran. In 1997 I earned a high school diploma in physics & mathematics, and one year later I entered the University of Shiraz to study mechanics of agricultural machinery. After graduation in 2003, I tried to enter a MA program in journalism, but I failed. So, I enlisted to serve in the Iranian army for two years. In 2005 after finishing my two years of service, I entered a MA program in communication at the University of Tehran. After graduation in 2007, I was employed by the University of Tehran as an expert researcher, but as I wanted to get a PhD and dedicate my life to research, I decided to resign after four months and get prepared to participate in the PhD entrance exam. I entered the PhD program at the same department in September 2009, and I am now a PhD candidate. Currently, I am in the final stages of my dissertation, which is a study on cross cultural schemata American people have of Iranians. I have some other works with this topic, and it will be one of my research interests in the future. I have also interests in cyberspace studies and media philosophy. I also like to read history.

In 2009, professor D. Ray Heisey introduced me to the Academy, and I am still a student member. I am also working with another member, Professor Michael H. Prosser, and I will start another project with two other members by May 2015.

Email: shahghasemi@ut.ac.ir
Website: http://esmatlyintercultural.blogfa.com/

Joseph Shaules

I discovered Edward Hall's The Silent Language in graduate school, and have been chasing culture ever since. I have worked in intercultural education in Japan, Mexico, and Europe for more than 25 years, spending ten years as a tenured faculty at Rikkyo University in Tokyo, as well as 5 years as a special associate professor at Rikkyo's Graduate School of Intercultural Communication. From April 2015 I will be a tenured full professor at the Faculty of International Liberal Arts at Juntendo University in Tokyo.

I came to intercultural living by way of foreign languages. As a teenager taking tickets at Sea World, a marine park in San Diego, California, I thought the Spanish-speaking visitors were “cool.” This led to a homestay in Mexico and starting a language school in the city of Zacatecas. I moved to Japan in 1986. I have also spent time living in France and studying French, and most recently have been studying Indonesian and escaping to Bali for writing getaways. 

My current research focuses on applying insights from cultural neuroscience to intercultural education. I talk about this in my upcoming book: The Intercultural Mind—Connecting Culture, Cognition and Global Living (Intercultural Press). It’s exciting that neuroscience is finally starting to catch up with the foundational insights of Edward Hall—that we are influenced by our culture in hidden ways.

It's a pleasure to be a member of the IAIR community of dedicated interculturalists—a space I feel at home, even when at a distance.

Email: jshaules@japanintercultural.org
Website: www.josephshaules.com

Suchitra Shenoy-Packer

Suchitra Shenoy-Packeris an assistant professor of organizational and multicultural communication at DePaul University, USA. She received her doctorate from Purdue University, USA and her master’s degree from Pittsburg State University, USA. Originally from India, Suchitra lived in Japan for a year as a teenager, the experiences of which inspired her to explore intercultural communication as an area of interest. Her other research interests include immigrant identities; careers, and meanings of work; women’s work histories; socialization and assimilation experiences of underrepresented groups; and family communication. In addition to numerous book chapters, her peer-reviewed research articles have been published in the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Journal of Communication and Religion, International Journal of Diversity, and theIowa Journal of Communication, among others.She is the author of India’s Working Women and Career Discourses: Society, Socialization, and Agency (forthcoming 2014, Lexington Books) and co-author of the textbook, Intercultural Communication in Everyday Life (2014, Wiley Blackwell).

She is a member of IAIR, the International Communication Association, and the National Communication Association. She served as the Secretary of the Intercultural Communication Division of the International Communication Association from 2010-2014. Suchitra joined IAIR in 2013 and looks forward to taking an active role in the association in years to come.

When she is not engaged in academic pursuits, Suchitra loves spending time with her husband and two-month-old son.

Email: sshenoy1@depaul.edu. Follow her @suchitrashenoy
Website:  http://communication.depaul.edu/faculty-and-staff/faculty/Pages/shenoy.aspx

Abayomi (Yomi) Shomoye

I am a doctoral student at the University of Lancaster in the Mental Health Program. I hold a BS degree in psychology and a MS degree in social psychology, both from University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Presently, I work as a clinical studies officer in the Research and Innovation Department of the Mental Health National Health Service (NHS) in the UK.  I have had the opportunity to manage over twenty multi-centre studies in the NHS. I implement clinical trial protocols and conduct research related to psychological assessments with patients enrolled in the National Institute of Health Research funded studies. I enjoy collaborating with principal investigators at universities and practitioners in the NHS.

My experience working with patients from diverse backgrounds influenced my research interest.  I am interested in cross-cultural adaptation and validation of assessment measures and clinical risk assessment and management of mental health patients in multicultural societies.

I am a new member of the Academy, as I just joined this year (2014) and I am looking forward to the 9th biennial congress of the IAIR in Bergen, Norway next year.

Besides my research role and doctoral work, I enjoy travelling and I am currently learning the British Sign Language (BSL).

Email: yomishomoye@yahoo.co.uk
Website:https://modules.lancs.ac.uk/user/profile.php?id=38700

Winston Sieck

Winston Sieck, PhD, is president and principal scientist at Global Cognition. Dr. Sieck is a cognitive psychologist and education researcher. He investigates competence in the overlapping areas of critical thinking, decision making, inquiry, metacognition, self-regulated learning, collaboration, communication, and intercultural interaction.

To keep sane and make scientific progress across these areas, Dr. Sieck focuses on uncovering essential cognitive skills that enhance performance in diverse situations. For example, he discovered that the same thinking skills used by great scientists are critical for efficient adaptation to new cultures (see “Metacognitive Strategies for Making Sense of Cross-Cultural Encounters,” 2013, Journal of Cross- Cultural Psychology).

Dr. Sieck has authored over 60 scientific publications. He enjoys speaking and has been invited to present in a variety of venues, including universities, U.S. government agencies, and NATO.

Dr. Sieck received his PhD in cognitive psychology from the University of Michigan in 2000, MA in statistics in 1995, and participated in the Culture & Cognition program headed by Dick Nisbett. He worked on multinational collaborative projects led by Frank Yates to understand cultural differences in critical thinking and decision-making among Japanese, Taiwanese, and Americans. He was recruited by Klein Associates in 2003, where he conducted cognitive-cultural field research in several locations, including Lebanon and Afghanistan. He joined IAIR in 2008, and presented at the Hawaii conference in 2009.

Winston lives in the village of Yellow Springs, a culture, arts, and nature hub in western Ohio. He enjoys hiking, skiing, scuba diving, and traveling to far off places.

Email: sieck@globalcognition.org
Website: http://www.globalcognition.org/about/winston-sieck/

George Simons

My name is George Simons (né Simonovitz). I was born of mixed Central European immigrant families to the US Western Reserve, where difference was at best suspect and at worst punished. Hence cultural identity has been a concern from day one, and continues to motivate my lifelong chase for ways to encourage and enable myself and others to understand, relate and relativize our identity narratives so we can peaceably and peacefully cohabit the neighborhood and the planet. Currently my research focuses on designing ways to explore culture as a whole person phenomenon through gamification.

diversophy® is  one way. I have created or edited over 60 games designed to create cultural competence in the face of differing, often conflicting ethnic, racial, religious, social, economic and political narratives, which are written in our minds, our muscles and our genes, to say nothing of our socially constructed story worlds and social designs.

Having visited and worked as consultant, trainer and betimes university lecturer in over fifty countries and lived in four, I am settled on the Côte d’Azur where I can bike the shores and swim the Med. Delighting in diverse young minds, I have hosted interns from 16 countries. Managing a handful of languages, I am a long time member of IAIR and SIETAR, repeatedly serving on SIETAR’s national and international boards. I currently manage its 5,000 strong European LinkedIn group on cultural competence.

I have authored numerous books and countless articles and reviews as well as co-creating eight Cultural Detective® instruments.

Email: diversophy@gmail.com
Website: www.georgesimons.com

Kevin Smith

smith kevin 

With or without romantic notions, migrant/expatriate life is an adventure. My research interest is the individual’s what, how, and why of lived practice, including an obscure Self. The means of this interest is arriving at an understanding of the individual’s, group’s, family’s, and/or community’s circumstances, negotiating tools for addressing identified needs, and demonstrating a coherent improvement in lived practice, all on the people-in-focus’ terms. Its end is trainable theory, knowledge and skills in expatriate/migrant self-management amid the forces bearing upon behaviour. This research approach is guided by a range of sociology’s and philosophy’s theoretical foundations, practical usefulness, and where possible my experiencing the circumstances.

My connection with IAIR began in 2012 with downloading articles from IJIR special issues 33(2) and 34(2) in relation to my PhD thesis featuring self-initiating expatriates. My inter-cultural experience includes living in Brunei Darussalam, a rural New Zealand Maori community, Taiwan, the Philippines, and currently Saudi Arabia. In these 20 years, I’ve been involved in a variety of organisations, largely in programme development and delivery and student roles. Academically, I’ve also wandered, assembling: a B. Ag. Sc.; P.G. Dip. Sec. Tchg.; Cert. I.S.; and a M.A. Appl. Ling., four useful professional certificates, and an anticipated PhD in Hum. Geo. As I approach the age of 60, where this all leads to is uncharted, but somewhere nearer “home” is likely.

Personal interests include learning, reading history and biographies, gardening, hunting, and whatever else of interest a locality offers. My migrant Chinese-Filipina wife’s expatriate experience exceeds mine.

Email: kev257ri@yahoo.co.nz

L. Ripley Smith

My journey down the path of intercultural studies began in the world of sport. Growing up in a large family with few resources left me with one inexpensive option for youth athletics - soccer. Within that soccer community I was introduced to the diverse social network (we called them friends back then) resident in my Colorado foothills neighborhood. Fast-forward to my senior year in college, a life-changing experience serving internally displaced people near Hermosillo, Mexico, and exposure to debilitating injustice and marginalization, set me on the course to study intercultural social support networks, acculturation, refugee resettlement, cross-cultural partnership development, and the role of trust in post-conflict regions.

I pursued my PhD at the University of Minnesota and learned of the ICC heritage birthed within those halls – the reputations of Howell, Paige, Albert, Gudykunst, Wiseman, Koester, and Hammer, among others motivated me to understand and address critical questions and problems within intercultural relations. It was the inaugural conference call by Bill Gudykunst that first drew my attention to IAIR. At that conference I experienced an uncommon camaraderie amongst the attendees that was foreign to my other conference involvements – I was nominated as a fellow shortly thereafter and have attended most of the conferences.

Alongside my role as professor at Bethel University I work and consult with local refugee resettlement agencies in Minneapolis/St. Paul. To keep things interesting, every other fall I take my guitar and 25 students to Europe for a semester abroad. And, yes, I still play soccer!

Email: r-smith@bethel.edu
Website: http://cas.bethel.edu/dept/comm/faculty/r-smith

Hannah Soong

I am an early career researcher and a full member of IAIR and Hawke Research Institute at University of South Australia. My current research focus is on the phenomenon of mobility of students through higher education and how international higher education is playing a major role in influencing one’s social, cultural, and practical life. My key research disciplines include migration studies, transnationalism, the meaning of social imagination, and intercultural adjustment. By using sociological and anthropological lenses, I have developed a conceptual framework to deepen one’s understanding of student mobility, who are on the verge of migration through education processes. I am looking forward to publishing my doctoral work as a monograph by mid-2015. The forthcoming book is entitled Transnational Students and Mobility: Lived Experiences of Migrations, and is to be published by Routledge (London) - http://www.bookdepository.com/Transnational-Students-Mobility-Hannah-Soong/9781138022836.

Prior to commencing my doctorate study, my honours research focused on how a person justifies one’s reasoning in moral, science, and social domains. Based on this honours project, I was later invited to work collaboratively with academics from another discipline (business and management) to examine how culture impacts one’s reasoning within ethical domains. Such collaboration took me to compare how Asian Malaysian students and Anglo-Celtic Australian students differed in their reasoning, and what possible underpinning reasons led to the reasoning difference. This was also my first contact with IAIR when I began to understand cultural influences from a socio-psychological framework. I soon became a member of IAIR and seek to attend more IAIR conferences in the years to come.

Whenever I can find free time, I like organising events such as a day picnic for new Australian migrants. I really like the new arrivals to know that they are not struggling alone in adjusting to live in a foreign country.

Email: Hannah.Soong@unisa.edu.au

Julie Spencer-Rodgers

Dr. Spencer-Rodgers received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. Originally from Quebec, Canada, she speaks English, French, and Spanish fluently, and holds three passports! She has conducted research in many countries including China, Japan, Morocco, Spain, Portugal, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates.

Dr. Spencer-Rodgers is currently an assistant professor at the Dept. of Psychology/Child Development at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She also is an adjunct professor at Tsinghua University (Beijing, China). Previously, she was an assistant research professor at the Dept. of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Dr. Spencer-Rodgers’ research interests lie in the areas of culture and the self, intercultural relations, social cognition, and social stigma and its mental/physical health consequences. In her current work, she is examining variables (e.g., group affirmation, dialectical thinking) that moderate the relationship between perceptions of discrimination and mental and physical health (e.g., neuroendocrinological and cardiovascular responses). She has published over 30 peer-reviewed journal articles, reviews, and book chapters, and most recently, an edited volume on dialectical thinking with Kaiping Peng (forthcoming, The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of Dialectical thinking, Oxford University Press). Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (NIMH, NHLBI), and the American Psychological Association.

Her professional honors include the 2011Early Career Award from IAIR and the

2004 best paper of the year award (Otto Klineberg Intercultural and International Relations Award) from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. She is an active Full Member of IAIR and has presented talks at IAIR conferences in Singapore and Reno.

Dr. Spencer-Rodgers has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in cultural psychology, health psychology, research methods, and statistics. Her hobbies include Bikram yoga, hiking, and doing homework with her 9 year-old son.

Email: jsrodger@calpoly.edu
Website: http://spencer-rodgers.socialpsychology.org

Hans W. Spijkerman

After my MA in sociology in 1974, I worked in development education in the Netherlands (Oxfam-Novib)till 1994. Then I became managing director of Osmose, a small, subsidized “consultancy on multicultural issues.” I met Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven, and in his book, Cross-cultural Psychology, I read about his Intercultural Effectiveness Training (IET). Together we produced this training for Dutch professionals to support them in their contacts with migrants. In 2007, Jan Pieter invited me to give a presentation at the IAIR conference in Groningen.

After my retirement in 2008, I started a PhD study: evaluation of the newest version of IET. Jan Pieter was supervisor, and I became a student member of IAIR.  My study took more time than expected, so we had to find another supervisor. We found her in Prof.  Yvonne Benschop at Nijmegen School of Management of Radboud University. The subject of my study has broadened.

I am studying the concept of Constructive Intercultural Contact (CIC). The research questions are:

•   What is CIC? A theoretical and empirical (qualitative) exploration of the concept.

•   Can you learn it? My intention is to evaluate the new IET.

•   Which impact on team cohesiveness (if any) occurs when (a number of) team members are trained in CIC by means of IET?

I was born in 1943. After living together for 25 years, my wife Anne and I were married in 1997. We live in Nijmegen since 1965. I like walking, reading and watching detectives. I played cello and intend to start again.

Email: hans.spijkerman@xs4all.nl

Robert Strauss

I am delighted to be a new member IAIR. Thank you Dr. Kenneth Cushner for pointing me in the direction of the Academy.

Currently, I am a Lead Faculty of Communication at Regis University (RU) in Denver, Colorado. At RU I facilitate courses in mixed methods research design as well as several that relate to intercultural communication. Also, I am a Managing Partner at Global Perspectives Consulting (GPC), a Colorado-based firm that provides consultation to executives who perform business processes across cultures. Our clients negotiate in Bangalore, India or manage projects in Buenos Aires, Argentina. GPC helps them turn off the autopilot and navigate effectively in the cross-cultural setting. By the way, Dr. Cushner and I are working together on a research project that is exploring emic versus etic approaches to culture. You may be familiar with those terms if you know Kenneth L. Pike from the University of Michigan.

In Colorado I enjoy hiking and mountain biking in the Rockies. It is hard to match the crisp clean air and bright sunshine. I love to travel and have had the privilege of doing so all over the world. Everyone should try the Malbec in Buenos Aires or take the Fat Tire bicycle tour of Barcelona, Spain! In my free time I read.  I look forward to meeting you in 2015 in Bergen, Norway.

Email: robert@gpccolorado.com
Website: http://www.gpccolorado.com/communicate-across-cultures/

Jaimee Stuart

I am a research fellow working at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, in the Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families and the Centre for Applied Cross-cultural Research. I consider myself to be a cultural/developmental psychologist and with a focus on the ecological contexts of positive youth development within multicultural environments. I am particularly interested in identity formation and how individuals and groups become psychologically resilient. I am also a keen methodologist who utilises mixed methods including both qualitative analysis and complex statistical modelling. Some of my diverse projects that examine elements of culture and human development include perceptions of multiculturalism, intergenerational cultural transmission, as well as bullying and victimisation. Outside of my academic work I am a consultant who develops and delivers evidence based training in the areas of intercultural communication, leadership, and well-being.

I became a member of the Academy as a doctoral student (supervised by Professor Colleen Ward). Through my interactions with members of the Academy during my studies I came to realise the extent of the global community of researchers working in the intercultural space. Unlike other associations, I found that many people affiliated with IAIR were engaged in applied research that was making a difference both locally and internationally. This encouraged me to extend the boundaries of my research and seek new and different ways of engaging in questions related to intercultural relations. I am looking forward to rekindling my international relationships in Norway this year and contributing to the broader community in IAIR.

Email: Jaimee.stuart@vuw.ac.nz
Personal website: www.infer.co.nz
University website:http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/about-us/people/staff/jaimee-stuart

Gefei Suo

Born in a small northern city in China, I migrated to the prosperous metropolis of Shanghai for higher education. My first intercultural experience began with my American MA and PhD advisor, Steve Kulich, and his German wife, Anne, who’s lived experience in different cultural contexts throughout the world aroused my curiosity about intercultural communication studies. It was with Dr. Kulich’s recommendation that I began to express interest in the activities appearing on the official website of IAIR and gradually was impressed with the leading role the organization plays in the field of intercultural relations. When doing my MA thesis on dating relationships, I interviewed an intelligent and handsome young man from the southern part of China, and later I married him and began experiencing the differences between regional cultures in China.

As a PhD student at the Intercultural Institute at Shanghai International Studies University, currently I am conducting my PhD dissertation research at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University as a visiting scholar with Dr. Judith Martin and Dr. Benjamin Broome. My daily experience with the local people and colleagues from other parts of the world further deepens my understanding about the significance of intercultural communication studies.

My research interests lie in intercultural adaptation, interpersonal communication, migration studies, cultural studies, as well as qualitative research methodology. In my spare time, I enjoy playing badminton, playing chess with my son, reading novels, as well as listening to Chinese traditional music.

Email: ke_suo@126.com, or gefeisuo@gmail.com


Shinobu Suzuki

 

Shinobu Suzuki, PhD, is a professor in the Graduate School of International Media, Communication, and Tourism Studies at Hokkaido University, Japan. She has 20 years of experience in teaching research methods in communication studies and English as a second language. Her research interests include interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communication. Specific topics of her research include: (a) influence of intergroup communication on cultures of international organizations, (b) conceptual and measurement equivalence of trait argumentativeness across cultures, (c) describing and comparing forms of written arguments across cultures, and (d) culture change in organizational public discourse. Her research has appeared in such journals as Human Communication ResearchCommunication MonographsCommunication Research, and the International Journal of Intercultural Relations. She is currently working on analysis of interactive arguments on the Internet, and its application to intercultural contexts.

She has earned a PhD from the University of Minnesota in speech communication. After her PhD, she returned to Japan, taught at Hokkaido Tokai University, and has been teaching at Hokkaido University. She joined the Academy in 2010. She enjoys gardening and cooking in her spare time.

Email: shinobu@imc.hokudai.ac.jp

Wim Swaan

I am an assistant professor at Maastricht School of Business and Economics (SBE) in The Netherlands since 1999 and coordinator of international classroom development at the same school since 2007. My original training was in economics, specializing in comparative, institutional economics (PhD 1993, University of Amsterdam, 1994 EACES Award for the best dissertation in comparative economics).

Born and raised in The Netherlands, my major intercultural experience was in Hungary, first as an undergraduate student (1982-1983), and later as a research fellow at the Institute of Economics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (1993-1999). Around the time of my return to The Netherlands in 1999, I started specializing in intercultural communication as a field of training, education and research. In 2001 I had a wonderful time at the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication in Portland, Oregon. I joined the Academy at the 2007 conference in Groningen, which was an equally inspiring experience.

Currently my main interest is in international classroom development. The majority of staff and students in my school are from outside The Netherlands. I have been developing a Faculty Development Programme (2005), specifically geared to our system of student-centered learning in small groups; an elective skills training in intercultural communication (2008); and an integral Programme International Classroom Development aimed at integrating intercultural skills into the curriculum (since 2011).

On a personal note, I have enjoyed my encounter with Buddhism as very enriching, deepening my intercultural experience, both in its approach to life and in my encounters with teachers and practitioners from a wide variety of countries from Asia, America, and Europe.

Email: w.swaan@maastrichtuniversity.nl
Website: www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/sbe(personal profile currently in development)
LinkedIn: http://nl.linkedin.com/pub/wim-swaan/12/914/b60

Agnes Szabo

I’m a PhD candidate at the Centre for Applied Cross-cultural Research (CACR) at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to work with such a distinguished team of researchers at CACR for the past three years, including my primary supervisor, Colleen Ward. My research sits at the cross-roads of developmental and cross-cultural psychology. More specifically, I’m studying how people in cultural transition develop a coherent and positive immigrant identity with a particular interest in social-cognitive information processing and decision making strategies underlying identity reconstruction of acculturating individuals. In addition to identity processes, I do research on acculturative stress and the effectiveness of coping strategies, and I have strong interests in research methods and psychometrics as well. I was born and bred in Hungary and moved to New Zealand only a few years ago. The first-hand experience of living in New Zealand as an immigrant served not just as an inspiration for my research, but made me even more passionate about studying acculturation. I have been a student member of the Academy since 2012 and attended my first conference in Reno. It was such a positive experience, and I gained so much from participating in the meeting both professionally and personally. I can’t wait to see everyone in Bergen next year. When I’m not trying to finish my PhD thesis, I do yoga and outdoor sports or spend my time with baking delicious delights for my friends and family.

Email: agnes.szabo@vuw.ac.nz
Website: www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/about-us/people/students-and-alumni/agnes-szabo

Betina Szkudlarek

Betina Szkudlarek is a senior lecturer in management at the University of Sydney Business School. She obtained her PhD in management cum laude from the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (The Netherlands). Betina's core research interests lie at the intersection of cross-cultural management, international HRM, international business ethics, and management of diversity. Her work has been published in top-tier international journals such as Organization Studies, Journal of Business Ethics, Human Resource Management and Academy of Management Learning and Education.

Betina has a wide experience in training, coaching and mentoring in various areas linked to intercultural communication, global leadership development, human resources, and management of diversity. She has worked with corporate and governmental clients including, among others, Shell, Deutsche Telekom, Daimler, MAN, Kaspersky, and Q8.

Betina loves traveling (probably as each and every member of the Academy) and trying out new experiences (the most recent ones included kitesurfing and stand-up comedy). She has been a member of the IAIR for 7 years.

Email: betina.szkudlarek@sydney.edu.au
Website: http://sydney.edu.au/business/staff/betinasz

Rimma Tangalycheva

My name is Rimma Tangalycheva. I am an associate professor at the  Faculty of Sociology, Saint-Petersburg State University (Russia).

My interest in cultural differences arose since I worked at a number of South Korean universities from 1996 to 2003. After coming back to Russia, I started to work at Saint-Petersburg State University. I teachgraduate and undegraduate courses in sociology of culture, global sociology,and intercultural communication.

I am leading a research program at the Institute of Eastern and Western societiesof St. Petersburg State University, where we conduct research onnew cultural practices in the context of globalization,acculturation of migrants in major Russian cities, etc. In addition, for five years I have been supervising the project “Enlargement of the disciplinary boundaries of Korean Studies at Saint-Petersburg State University,”supported by the Academy of Korean Studies.

I became involved with the IAIR community after taking part in a master class on cultural assimilator technique given by Kenneth Kushner at Gotland University in Visby (Sweden). With our students, we have mastered this technique and applied it to work with migrants in St. Petersburg, as well as to improve the intercultural competence of the participants of the Russian-Korean communication. I participated in IAIR conferences in Singapore and in Reno (USA). I have also reviewed for the International Journal of Intercultural Research.

E-mail: rimma98@yahoo.com

Eugene (Evgeny) Tartakovsky

Dr. Eugene (Evgeny) Tartakovsky is a senior lecturer at the Tel-Aviv University School of Social Work. He was born in the former Soviet Union and immigrated to Israel after the breakdown of the USSR. He received a MA in clinical psychology from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and a PhD from the School of Social Work at Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheba. Before joining Tel-Aviv University, Dr. Tartakovsky worked as a psychologist in an adolescent immigration program at the Israeli Ministry of Education and as a coordinator of children and family programs in the Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. His research interests include values, immigration, and intercultural contacts. Dr. Tartakovsky has published over 40 articles and book chapters and has presented his works extensively at international conferences. He is the editor of two books: one on community psychology and another on immigration. Dr. Tartakovsky consults governmental and non-governmental organizations on issues related to multiculturalism, immigration, and social work with ethnic minorities and immigrants. In his free time, he enjoys reading spy novels, cooking, and traveling.

Email: evgenyt@post.tau.ac.il
Website: http://www.socialwork.tau.ac.il/component/option,com_ckeditor/lang,he/plugin,linkBrowser/task,plugin/?option=com_content&view=article&id=140:eugene-evgeny-tartakovsky&catid=66

Alexander Tatarko

Alexander Tatarko is a PhD associate professor in the psychology department at the State University Higher School of Economics (HSE) in Moscow, Russia. His areas of interest include topics such as intercultural interaction, social capital, and values. He has been engaged in research in the field of cross-cultural psychology since 2000. He has studied inter-ethnic relations in the multicultural regions of Russia and has participated in the design and implementation of a scientifically-based training in intercultural interaction in the southern regions of Russia. Currently, he is engaged in research on the influence of cultural and psychological factors on multiculturalism in Russia and the C.I.S countries. He is also interested in the study of the influence of culture and ethnic heterogeneity on social capital. He lectures in the areas of cross-cultural psychology, advanced social psychology, and cross-cultural psychology of organizational behavior in the HSE (Higher School of Economics).

 

Email: tatarko@yandex.ru

Linda K. Tip

I am a social psychologist with a main research interest in intergroup relations. The majority of my research is focused on how we can improve relationships between people of different ethnic backgrounds, with an emphasis on acculturation processes, discrimination, and well-being of ethnic minority members. I have conducted research with a variety of majority and minority groups in England, the Netherlands, Canada, and Chile.

I am currently a research fellow at the University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom, where I work on a research project on refugee resettlement. This exciting project looks into long-term integration and well-being of refugees through a longitudinal comparative study of resettled refugees in various locations in the UK (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/migration/research/current/refugeeresettlement).

My interest in intergroup relations started during my undergraduate studies at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. During my studies there, I worked as a research assistant for Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven. As part of my job, I helped organising the IAIR conference in Groningen in 2007, and this is where my connection with the Academy started. Five years later, the Academy kindly awarded me with the 2013 Outstanding Dissertation Award for my PhD research on acculturation processes, which I had conducted under the supervision of Rupert Brown in the UK. This gave me the opportunity to present my work at the conference in Reno, Nevada. 

In my free time, I enjoy travelling, and long-distance runs and mountain bike rides along the beach or in the hills of the English countryside.

 

Email: L.Tip@sussex.ac.uk

Juliana Murniati Tjaya

 

 

I have taught since 1991 as a member of the faculty of psychology at Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia. I completed my doctoral dissertation on trust building of Indonesian and German workgroups in 2007 at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany. My research interests are in intergroup relations, in particular, intercultural competence and intergroup trust building. Some of my publications are: “Profiling Intercultural Competence of Indonesians in Asian Workgroups” (article), Leader and Change: The Experience of Indonesian Professionals(book), “Developing Intercultural Competence in Indonesia: Opportunities and Challenges”(bookchapter), and “Developing a Culture-Adequate Intercultural Competence Program for Indonesian Students”(article). I have attended conferences such as the International Congress on Trust Research in Amsterdam, the Asian Social Psychology conference in Kunming, China, and the Symposium of Intercultural Competence in Germany. Besides reading, I am interested in swimming, jogging, and doing community services for the church. Occasionally I conduct intercultural training for the students from remote parts of Indonesia or pre-departure training for overseas students. At present, I am the Chairwoman for the KAAD (Katholischer Akademischer Auslaender Dienst) Indonesian chapter.

Email: jmurniati@yahoo.com

Aiden Tabor

I am a very new member of the Academy, as I just joined this year. It’s a little embarrassing that it took me so long to join, since I went to my first conference in Hawaii in 2009. That was actually the first academic conference I had ever attended, and I was thrilled to find a place where people wanted to talk about culture as much as I wanted to listen. This year’s Reno conference was equally enjoyable and I was happy to meet so many interesting people. At the moment I have just submitted my PhD thesis titled International Migration Decision-making: The Peculiar Case of New Zealand. Pre-departure studies are my area of specialty, and I have explored how British, South African, and Indian migrants decide to leave their country of origin and how they select a destination. I have also examined individual differences, such as personality traits, of those remaining in New Zealand and those preparing to immigrate.  Additionally, I am interested in online communities, family decision-making and support, organizational psychology, and intercultural training. I currently work as the Managing Editor of the International Journal of Intercultural Relations, so I am happy to help if you have any questions about our publication process. When I have free time, I love to go hiking with my family, read, bake scones and do photography.

Email: aidan.tabor@vuw.ac.nz
Website: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/about-us/people/students-and-alumni/aidan-tabor

Ingemar Torbiörn

I am professor emeritus in social and organizational psychology at Stockholm University and a charter fellow of IAIR from way back in 1998. My main fields of research as they relate to intercultural matters deal with two adjacent scientific domains that are unfortunately not so much cross-referenced between them. One of these perspectives is psychological or individual level adjustment in unfamiliar cultural settings, i.e., processes of adjustment, cultural barriers, etc. The other perspective deals with organizational psychology phenomena in international firms or in MNEs as subsumed in the growing research field of International Human Research Management (IHRM). Here my writings have treated strategic approaches and consequences of such approaches in the staffing of international operations, cross-cultural role relations in MNEs, etc. In my book, Living Abroad: Personal Adjustment and Personnel Policy in the Overseas Setting, from 1982 I tried, in some sense, to combine the two perspectives. Examples of writings within the former field include the IJIR article “A new Conceptualization of Intercultural Adjustment and the Goals of Training” in collaboration with Cornelius Grove, which won two awards, and “Culture Barriers as a Social Psychological Construct: An Empirical Validation.” Writings in the field of IHRM may be exemplified by “The Structure of Managerial Roles in Cross-Cultural Settings” or by “Operative and Strategic Use of Expatriates in New Organizations and Market Structures.”

I am now retired and live in Stockholm, Sweden and have some more time for hobbies such as open-air activities, amateur ornithology, painting, etc.

 

E-mail: itn@psychology.su.se

Michael F. Tucker

I am President of Tucker International, founded in 1994, delivering proprietary intercultural assessment, coaching and training programs for global organizations.  I am a lifetime member of the American Psychological Association; an early member, fellow, and on the membership committee of IAIR; a founding member and Ethics Chair of SIETARUSA; and a Certified Management Consultant and Trustee of IMCUSA.  I am also the senior faculty member for the NASA International Project Management Program.

I began my career developing situational tests for the American Peace Corps and then spent some seven years as a Peace Corps consultant, doing field work for training volunteers in Iran and in Afghanistan and living with my family at training centers in Puerto Rico and Brazil.  I led a research team in Brazil to identify and measure intercultural adjustment for purposes of assessment and training.  I conducted large scale research for the US Navy, resulting in the Navy Overseas Assignment Inventory (NOAI). 

I co-founded Moran, Stahl & Boyer International (MS&B) in 1982, where we included 8 of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies as clients for our assessment and training programs for international assignment. MS&B International was an owner, and I served on the Board of Directors, of INTEC Japan.

I am the author of a number of assessment instruments, including the OAI, Expat TAP and Global Leader TAP, the IMA, and the SETD.  My major research articles and book chapters include: Project Management for Space Programs; The Definition, Measurement and Prediction of Intercultural Adjustment and Job Performance Among Corporate Expatriates; and Leading Across Cultures in the Human Age: An Empirical Investigation of Intercultural Competency Among Global Leaders. 

I have now lived or worked in some 45 countries, but now prefer to spend my free time in the Colorado and Utah mountains, skiing, fishing, golfing and hiking.

Email: michael@tuckerintl.com
Website: www.tuckerintl.com

Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver (1952) has studied psychology at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. He holds a Ph.D. from the same university.  He holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia.

He has published over 375 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. The main topics in his research involve bias and equivalence, psychological acculturation and multiculturalism, cognitive similarities and differences, response styles, translations and adaptations. He is or has supervised about 35 PhD studies and 5 post-doc studies. He has teaching experience in cross-cultural psychology and methods/statistics. He has presented keynotes and invited lectures at various conferences and workshops in various countries. He is one of the most frequently cited cross-cultural psychologists in Europe. 

He has received grants from various Dutch institutions (such as NWO and WOTRO), European Union (Marie Curie), South African Netherlands Research Programme on Alternatives in Development, and South African National Research Foundation. He is member of the following professional organizations: International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, International Association of Applied Psychology, European Association of Psychological Assessment, International Academy for Intercultural Research, and the International Test Commission.

He is the former editor of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, and serves on the board of various journals; he has evaluated manuscripts for about 100 journals as ad-hoc reviewer.

He has been vice-dean for research and vice-dean for education of his faculty and vice-director of Babylon, the interdisciplinary research center for studies of multicultural societies at Tilburg University.  He is a former president of Division 2 (Assessment and Evaluation) of the International Association of Applied Psychology and is now President of the European Association of Psychological Assessment.

He is the 2013 recipient of the International Award of the American Psychological Association (for his contributions to international cooperation and to the advancement of knowledge of psychology). h-index ISI = 22; h-index Google Scholar = 44; i10 index Google Scholar: 106

Email: fons.vandevijver@uvt.nl
Webpages:

·          http://www.fonsvandevijver.org

·         http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/webwijs/show/?uid=fons.vandevijver

·         http://www.psy.uq.edu.au/directory/index.html?id=1955

·         http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Fons_Van_de_Vijver/

Karen van Oudenhoven-van der Zee

Prof. Dr. Karen van Oudenhoven-van der Zee (1966) is dean of the faculty of Social Science at VU University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. She holds a chair in intercultural competence at VU University and a chair in organizational psychology, cultural diversity, and integration at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. Her research interest concerns cultural diversity at work. More specifically, she is interested in the role of personality, social identity, and organizational climate as moderators of diversity outcomes at work. Together with Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven, she developed the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire, an instrument that has been translated in various languages and is widely cited. Because of her interest in cultural diversity at work, VU University appointed her as Chief Diversity Officer. In her free time, she likes to travel and explore different cultures, play the piano, and watch cult movies.

 

Email: k.i.van.Oudenhoven-vander.Zee@vu.nl

Maykel Verkuyten

 

I am a professor at the Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. I am also the academic director of the European Research Centre on Migration and Ethnic Relations at Utrecht University (Ercomer: www.ercomer.eu). This centre was established in 1992 and has its own two-year research master program in Migration, Ethnic Relations, and Multiculturalism. By training I am a social psychologist and cultural anthropologist. Together with my colleagues at Ercomer, I have conducted experimental, survey, and discourse analytical research as well as ethnographic types of work.

My main interests are in questions of ethnic and cultural identity, intergroup relations, acculturation, and multiculturalism. I have examined these issues among older children, adolescents and adults, among diverse populations in the Netherlands and other European countries, and in countries like Malaysia and Mauritius. My work has appeared in journals such as Child Development; Developmental Psychology; Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology; Journal of Experimental Social Psychology; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology; Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin; and Ethnic and Racial Studies. I have contributed chapters to books such as the Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity and Realizing the Potential of Immigrant Youth, and I have written several monographs including “The Social Psychology of Ethnic Identity,” and recently, “Identity and Cultural Diversity: What Social Psychology Can Teach Us.” I have been an associate editor of the British Journal of Social Psychology and I am a member and regular conference presenter at IAIR since 2006.

I enjoy cycling in the mountains, reading literature, and listening to different kinds of music.

Email: m.verkuyten@uu.nl
Website: http://www.ercomer.eu/researchers/prof-dr-maykel-verkuyten/

 

Benjamin G. Voyer

Dr. Benjamin Voyer is an associate professor of marketing at ESCP Europe and a visiting fellow in psychology at the London School of Economics. He received a PhD in social psychology from the London School of Economics (LSE), and a doctorate of science in management (DSc / Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches) from the Sorbonne University in Paris. Before this, he studied marketing at HEC Paris and the London Business School. He is also a chartered psychologist in the UK (CPsychol), a chartered scientist (CSci), and Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society (AFBPsS).

Dr Voyer’s research focuses on self-perception, and the way it affects consumption and behaviours in organisations. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 scientific contributions to the field of applied psychology (e.g., journal articles, conference presentations, case studies). Beyond academic research, he also collaborates with the media (TV, radio, press) as a scientific consultant (e.g., CNN International, The Washington Post, Sky News, CNBC, BBC 2, BBC Radio 4, Financial Times). He worked for several years as a marketing practitioner in different industries, including FMCGs, banks, and public institutions and remains a freelance consultant in the area of marketing and organisational psychology.

Email: B.Voyer@lse.ac.uk

Gary Weaver

Gary Weaver grew up in Manitowoc, Wisconsin where he worked as a spot welder, canner, and short-order cook. For the past forty-seven years he has been a professor in the School of International Service at American University where he was one of the founders of the graduate program in international communication. He also taught international relations at the University of Colombo in Sri Lanka and courses on multicultural management for the National Training Laboratory’s (NTL) graduate program at AU. Weaver designed, and is currently teaching, the University’s first graduate online course in Intercultural Relations.            

Weaver is an intercultural practitioner/scholar who has been a fellow of IAIR since its early years and was one of the first members of SIETAR.  In 1999, he founded the Intercultural Management Institute (IMI), an intercultural training and education program for diplomats and executives, and he is publisher of the Intercultural Management Quarterly. Each March, he chairs the annual IMI conference for professionals in various areas of international and intercultural relations.

He received his PhD in international relations from American University with studies at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and the Psychoanalytic Institute of Mexico and post-doctoral studies at the Washington School of Psychiatry. His publications include: The University and Revolution; America’s Midlife Crisis: The Future of a Troubled Superpower (with Adam Mendelson); and most recently, Intercultural Relations: Communication, Identity, and Conflict. Weaver was the editor of a 2004 special edition of the Journal of International Communication entitled “Intercultural Relations” and he is one of the co-authors of an upcoming article in IJIR on ethics in the field of intercultural relations. He also enjoys casinos and reading Erik Larson novels.

Email: gweaver@american.edu

Robert Weigl

I am a clinical and community psychologist (PhD, Univ. of Michigan ‘73) who has worked as a therapist and mental health program developer for over forty years.  I began serious intercultural work in the early 90s, when I had training as an intercultural trainer with some great teachers, Milton Bennett having influenced me the most.  I have presented symposia or papers at four IAIR conferences which reflect my strongest interests:  the interface between new immigrants and hosts in American communities; development of intercultural experiences for youth; and developing cultural self-study as a training tool. My methodology in this last area has been adopted by the APA Office of Continuing Education.

I have been active in the programmatic development of Semester at Sea (out of UVA), having taught for them for four semesters aboard ship.  I have taught cross-cultural psychology for three other Washington D.C. universities and developed an undergraduate textbook in the field for Cambridge University Press.  I am Spanish-speaking and worked with WHO in Latin America. Currently, I am involved in action research focused on building intercultural capacity at a municipal level in Alexandria, VA.  

I have lived in Japan—my wife, Gail, is a Japanese art history scholar. Together we have traveled in 56 countries and for a long time had a second home in England.  I garden, sing, and love long conversations over dinner.

Email: weiglrg@aol.com

Kinga Williams

Born and bred in Budapest, into a medical dynasty  and ‘goulash-socialism,’  I first graduated in English and Hungarian literature and linguistics (MA 1982); the same year I was appointed lecturer (ELTE Department of English), later did a doctorate while teaching (1984), then married an English Medievalist and moved to Britain (1985), where I still live—NB as Hungarian as ever...

I first taught poetics in the Reading University English Department (1985-89) while studying psychology at Birkbeck College, London (BSc 1990); then I did clinical psychology training with University College, London (1990-93), taught abnormal psychology to Oxford under-and post-graduates (1993-98), gave birth to daughter Anna (1995, bilingual), and in 1998 qualified as an adult mental hygiene and clinical psychologist with HIETE OPNI Department of Clinical Psychology, Budapest.

To date, I Google as “Dr. Kinga Williams MA PhD BSc DipClinPsych BABCPreg, Clinical Psychologist, Cognitive-Behavioural Psychotherapist, Lecturer in Abnormal Psychology, with particular interest in the psychopathology of immigration and culture shock in adults and the elderly – specialising in the applied psychology of international transitions.”

Work comprises blocks of clinical appointments and supervising, interspersed with globe-trotting to conferences—to participate with a vengeance (IAIR 2009, 2011, 2013).

Private practice allowing no access to primary research, I build theoretical models—some as lectures (IAIR 2009), others as posters (IACCP Best Poster Award 2005; 2007).

Despite falling between categories, I found myself on the governing board of the Society for Terrorism Research (2011-2014), while still on the editorial board of the Journal of Intercultural Communication (2004 to date).

A practicing ex-pat, I am happiest on a plane.

A once-aspiring concert-pianist, music for me is classical.

A former gymnast, I believe in fitness.

An erstwhile literary historian, I no longer read much.

Like my father before me, I am totally devoted to my patients.

He died of it – I hope to retire before that happens...

 

Email: kingakezia@yahoo.co.uk

Lisa E. Wills

 

I earned a BS degree in microbiology from Howard University, and hold a MA degree in comparative literature and a PhD in educational psychology and research from the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina. Currently, through Valador, Inc., I am Education Research Manager for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Office of Education Infrastructure Division. For NASA Education, I bring to bear expertise in data collection instrumentation development for performance assessment of undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate STEM-related activities, as well as STEM educator professional development. In this role, of particular import and interest to me is the impact of NASA’s STEM education efforts on the United States' STEM workforce.

I came to IAIR through a circuitous route: In an effort to explain attitudinal and behavioral changes towards cultural difference in my undergraduates as a comparative literature graduate assistant, I sought construct-appropriate inventories. Back then, the work published by scholars Dan Landis, Milton Bennett, Mitch Hammer, and Janet Bennett made a profound impact on my research with pre-service teachers and intercultural competence. Their work continues to inform my current agenda. Eventually, all paths led me to IAIR in this here phase of my professional life. I find sharing this common thread with such an accomplished network simply, profoundly…cool.  

Located in Washington, D.C., the United States capital, I am thriving in a cultural mix of activity that is both intellectually stimulating and personally enjoyable. I’m an avid road cyclist and love most things outdoors. If I’m not enjoying a good sci-fi fantasy or mystery novel, then I’m traipsing through one of the Smithsonian Institution’s many museums or publically accessible research centers. I love international travel, but resent long plane rides unless accompanied by my husband. Next on my bucket list? Learning to paddle board in the waters of John Obey beach in Sierra Leone, West Africa. See you in Norway next summer!

Email: lisawillsphd@gmail.com

Wu-Tien Wu

Dr. Wu-Tien Wu is emeritus professor of special education at National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU), chair professor of National Taichung University of Education, and Distinguished Professor of Lingnan Normal University, China. He earned his PhD (in school psychology) from the University of Kentucky, USA in 1975.  He is one of the pioneers of gifted education in Taiwan and an internationally known educator in this field. He has been the leader for numerous professional organizations both in Taiwan and abroad, such as the founding president of the Chinese Association of Gifted Education (in Taiwan) and the president of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children (WCGTC) (1993-97). Over the past four decades of services at the University, he has held many administrative posts such as chair of the Special Education Department and dean of the College of Education at NTNU. In addition, he has served as the committee chair of education of the National Science Council (NSC), Taiwan, ROC.

Professor Wu’s research and service interests center on the discovery and development of human potentials. His expertise covers special education, gifted education, counseling, and testing. He has published over 50 books and 200 scientific papers in either Chinese or English. He has received numerous recognitions and awards, such as the distinguished research award of NSC, the Distinguished Educator of the Year in Taiwan, the Distinguished Alumnus of NTNU, the Marden Fellow of the University of Hong Kong, the distinguished service award of WCGTC, and the life-long achievement award of the Taiwan Guidance and Counseling Association.

Professor Wu is a Fellow of IAIR and served as the organizing committee chair of the 2005 IAIR international conference in Taipei.

Email: t14004@ntnu.edu.tw

Ikushi Yamaguchi

I am a professor at the School of Information and Communication, Meiji University, Tokyo.  Between 1999 and 2001, I was a visiting scholar at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California.

I have been a full member of IAIR since it was established in 1997.  I have participated in IAIR conferences several times, presenting papers at the 1998 conference at California State University, Fullerton, the 1999 conference at Kent State University, the 2007 Netherlands conference at the University of Groningen, and the 2011 conference at the University of Hawaii, Manoa.  Also, two of my papers were published inthe International Journal of Intercultural Research, Vols. 33(1) and37(1). 

I received a BA from Doshisha University in Kyoto, a MA from the University of Hawaii, and a PhD from the International Christian University, Tokyo.  My specialty is organizational communication and organizational behavior.  My research interests are: communication audits, leadership communication, influence tactics, organizational justice, and teamwork.  I have conducted both qualitative and quantitative research for workers in business organizations and care facilities, including a cross-cultural study. 

In 2012 and 2013 I received Best Paper Award at the 11th and 12th Asia-Pacific Conferences of the Association for Business Communication in South Korea and Kyoto, respectively. I am an author, a co-author and a co-editor of 15 books (in Japanese) and more than 50 academic papers (Japanese and English).  In addition, I have written a series of weekly newspaper articles and several essays for non-academic journals.

Email: ikuy@meiji.ac.jp

Min Yang

I aman assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. As a teacher educator, I teach undergraduate and master’s courses in curriculum, assessment, and research methods, and I supervise doctoral students in related areas.

I have been a member of the Academy for four years, since September 2010. One of the IAIR conferences I attended was the 7th Biennial Conference (24-28 July, 2011) in Singapore. My connection to the Academy is through the investigation of university students’ intercultural experiential learning: interaction between students’ goals, experiences and outcomes of studying abroad; students’ identity development in and through multicultural service learning; and students’ social engagement in diversifying campuses. Another theme of my research is the exploration of the characteristics of the Chinese learning culture (which is embedded in Confucian-Heritage culture) as manifested in learning, teaching, and assessment in classrooms and how these can be can be geared toward productive learning for higher education students.

Being a Mainland Chinese, I enjoy my life and work in Hong Kong. With her magnificent view of the Victoria Harbour and her people from various ethnic and cultural backgrounds, this Asian Pearl is becoming even more dynamic and beautiful. I look forward to meeting fellow members of the IAIR here and in other places of the world where the research and socialising events of the Academy bring us together.

Email: myang@ied.edu.hk

Tomoko Yoshida

Tomoko Yoshida is a TCK who was born and raised in the Philippines and has lived in New Zealand, the USA, and Japan. She entered the field under the tutelage of Dr. Edward Stewart in the late 1980s. After completing her master’s degree at Syracuse University under the guidance of Dr. Paul Pedersen, she served as a project fellow at the East West Center working with Dr. Richard Brislin. Currently, she is a professor in the Faculty of Business & Commerce at Keio University and is serving as the SIETAR Japan journal co-editor. She became a fellow of the Academy a few years ago and has attended the IAIR conferences in Hawaii and Reno. She is looking forward to the upcoming conference in Bergen!

Tomoko has authored various books and articles on intercultural training, returnee adjustment issues, and biethnic cultural identity. During her free time she enjoys hiking with her dog, Tappy, and discovering new onsens (hot springs) with her friends. If any of you are visiting Tokyo and are interested in going to onsens, please let her know!

Email: tomokoyoshida414@gmail.com
Website: http://www.fbc.keio.ac.jp/teacher/staff_list/yoshidatomoko/index.html

Anastassia Zabrodskaja

 

I am a professor of Estonian as a Second Language at the Institute of Estonian Language and Culture in Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia and a senior research fellow in sociolinguistics at the Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics at the University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia

The metaphor “Life with three languages” became a part of my life in 1999 when I began my studies at the university. Using Russian, Estonian, and English was suddenly my everyday reality. Choosing languages for different purposes and code-switching have all been part of my daily language practice. Therefore, the issues of multilingualism and intercultural communication are very close to my heart and I wish to learn more about them being a part of IAIR.

I received my PhD in linguistics from Tallinn University in 2009. Since 2003 I have been involved in research projects on the development of the Estonian linguistic landscapes, bilingual speech and aspects of ethnolinguistic vitality, where my roles as a (main) project participant have included supervisory work with students and scientific research to analyse language dynamics and change in Estonia.

Currently I study language usage and orientation patterns amongst the Russians in Estonia in the project “Sustainability of Estonian in the Era of Globalisation.” I am also involved with the COST project “New Speakers in Multilingual Europe: Opportunities and Challenges” as a management committee member in representation of Estonia. The issues of new speakers are relevant to the Estonian context as the multilingual setting in Estonia involves speakers of different linguistic competence, both native, relatively integrated old groups of speakers, as well as new speakers.

To broaden the mind, I travel as “it is better to see something once than hear about it hundred times.” I like to play the piano and read the classics.

Email: anastassia.zabrodskaja@gmail.com
Website: https://www.etis.ee/portaal/isikuCV.aspx?PersonVID=37362&lang=en